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George II Silver Sugar nips   
Phillips Garden (possibly), Unknown C 1740

Early Georgian sugar nips with scroll work arms and scallop shell grips. Scratched initials MD in hinge box. Marks (makers and lion passant) on outer side of finger ring, however the makers mark is only partially visible and appears to be ig (which we are informed could possibly be Phillips Garden). The date mark absent as is usual for nips of this period.

Cape Silver Butterknife - Fiddle pattern   
Peter Clarke Daniel, Cape C 1850

Plain, good hallmarks, English Pseudo and makers name. Daniel arrived in the Cape in 1820 (one of the settlers) as a child from Dublin, his Father (who had the same name) was also a silversmith.

Newcastle Silver sugar tongs   
John Langlands I & John Robertson I, Newcastle C 1780

Early pair of bright cut English provincial sugar tongs with clear makers and duty mark, however date and town mark are not present. Quite heavy and solid, have a nice feel. Initials TMM on bow.

Bacchanalian Pattern Silver Spoon - Bacchus, God of Wine   
Wakely & Wheeler, London 1906

A magnificent Bacchanalian pattern silevr dessert spoon, with fluted bowl. This is one of the rarest English silver flatware patterns, it was originally produced by Paul Storr. The spoon shows Bacchus, the Roman God of wine, riding a lion, whilst a topless Diana looks on, with another figure asleep at her feet. The back of the spoon is also beautifully decorated, with a masque over a theatre curtain, and tilted amphora of wine. Bunches of grapes and vine leaves complete the decoration. The spoon is extremely good quality, quite heavy to hold, sturdy enough to use as a serving spoon, and the hallmarks are clear. Bacchanalian pattern is shown in "Silver Flatware" by Pickford (pg. 127), where an identical dessert service made by Wakely and Wheeler is depicted. The pattern was originally designed by Thomas Stothard, the famous painter and designer, for Rundell, Bridge & Rundell, the Royal silversmiths, in 1812, the first service was used by King George III. The other rare patterns in the same series include Boar...

Silver Sauce ladles (pair)   
George Smith & William Fearn, London 1795

Beautiful, elegant, early Old English pattern sauce ladles, with a long drop and engraved initials JIL. Smith and Fearn were leading spoonmakers, and the hallmarks are very clear.

Cape dinnerfork - Fiddle pattern   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1830

Cape tablefork in good condition, with very clear pseudo English hallmarks and makers mark. Initials ADL on the back of the fork.

Cape Silver Dessert Fork - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A Cape silver dessert fork, in the Fiddle pattern, with 4 prongs, which are quite long. The hallmarks are clear but slightly worn, they include pseudo English duty mark, castle, date letter C and makers mark LT. This is mark 139 in Cape Silver by Welz, the C has a small gap.

Cape Silver Tablefork - Lotter   
Willem Godfried Lotter, Cape C 1820

A Fiddle pattern Cape Silver Tablefork by a well regarded Cape Silversmith, with engraved initials AW. The hallmarks are clear, being the makers mark struck twice. Lotter worked as a silversmith from 1810 - 1835, and was regarded by Heller as one of the finest of all Cape silversmiths.

Antique Silver Asparagus server   
Daniel and John Wellby Ltd, London 1907

Asparagus server with plain handle and blades with pierced floral design, one blade has a lip. Hallmarks are clear, the spring is also marked with a lion passant. Wellby was reknowned for its fine copies of earlier designs, and supplied many leading retailers, including Barnard & Sons. They were located in Garrick St, Covent Garden from 1866 - 1965.

Antique Silver Sugar sifter   
James Wakely & Frank Wheeler, Lias & Son, London 1897

Typically late Victorian sugar sifter with ornate cast handle depicting flowers and foliage, and gilded bowl. Hallmarks very clear.

Russian Silver Sardine Fork - Novgorod   
CH, Novgorod or Orel? C 1850

A lovely Russian silver sardine fork in traditional style, the handle a well modelled fish, connected to the 3 pronged fork with a curved, twisted stem. The 3 prongs are also curved, and have short wide tines with flattened ends, for ease of use. The hallmarks include makers mark CH (or CB?), 84 standard mark and town mark, which is a little worn. Our best estimate is Novgorod or Orel (Watts, Russian Silver Hallmarks, pg 42-45), we are open to correction here. This sardine fork has now been featured in an article entitled "Russian Silver Flatware Servers" by Dale Bennett, in the Magazine "Silver", January 2015, pages 14-19. It is described as "a most unusual flatware server", the author has never seen or heard of another Russian sardine fork. He describes it as a "highly imaginative server, with solid cast realistic sardine terminal". He describes the prongs as spade shaped, not sharp or pointed as in American sardine forks used for spearing, this is a lifter. He confirms town mark of Novgorod and date mid 1...

Irish Silver sugar tongs - Georgian   
William Cummins, Dublin 1814

Georgian Irish Fiddle pattern sugar tongs, with very clear hallmarks. They also have the original owners initials (W over CW) scratch engraved in 18th century style (not script). Cummins worked from 1813 to 1846, so these tongs were made very early in his career. He worked from 31 Exchequer Street, and his name was also recorded as Cumying.

Dognose Hanoverian Dutch Silver Tablefork   
Bartholomeus van der Tooren, Rotterdam 1768

Early Dutch bottom-marked silver tablefork, with transitional elements from Dognose to early Hanoverian pattern. The fork has a distinct Dognose, and a very pronounced rib on the front of the fork. The fork has a double drop, with the "Hague Leaflet" (lofje), a little lip at the join of the handle, typical of flatware made in The Hague (as opposed to Amsterdam) (source Dutch Silver, pg 83, MH Gans). The fork is of good gauge, very pleasing to hold, and engraved with the initials HLZW on the back. The hallmarks are exceptionally clear, showing makers mark (triangle device), lion rampant silver guarantee mark (875), Rotterdam city mark, and date letter K for 1768. The fork also has a puzzling and rare 5th hallmark (added later), being the duty mark used in the Netherlands between 1807 and 1810, for articles of foreign manufacture without payment of duty (source Tardy, International Hallmarks on Silver, pg 317). We can only surmise the fork was re-imported into the Netherlands at that time. Thanks to information...

Chinese Export Silver Dessert Spoon - Linchong   
Linchong, Canton, China C 1800-1850

A Chinese export silver dessert spoon in the Fiddle pattern. The pseudo-English hallmarks are in excellent condition, well struck and very clear. They include lion passant with triangular indent to punch, crowned leopards head, duty mark and makers mark L. Linchong was an early maker of Chinese export silver, his silver is usually in the English Georgian style. He worked from New China Street, Canton. Linchong is described as the "unsung Cantonese master Georgian silversmith, who rivals Paul Storr in work quality, whose silver is very rare" - www.chinese-export-silver.com

Art Deco Silver Coffee spoons   
Thomas Bradbury & Sons, Sheffield 1928

A lovely set of classic deco coffee spoons, in original box. All 6 spoons are clearly hallmarked.

Cape Silver Tablefork -Jan Lotter   
Jan Lotter, Cape 1813-1817

Plain Cape silver tablefork in the Old English pattern, with original owners initials lightly scratched on back (MF). Hallmark very clear, makers mark struck twice, either side of a flower (or bunch of grapes). Jan Lotter was an excellent silversmith who made most of the cape orangespoons (lemoenlepels) found today. He traded from Keerom St.

Art Deco cake forks (6)   
Charles William Fletcher, Sheffield 1927

Beautiful set of dainty Art Deco cake forks, in original box. Very clear hallmarks on all 6 forks. Charles Fletcher took over the firm Brewis and Co in 1907, the firm still exists today.

Cape Silver Berry Teaspoon - Waldek   
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1830

A rare Cape silver berry teaspoon, in the Fiddle pattern, with gilded berried bowl and decorated handle. The spoon must be well travelled in it's early life, as the spoon was made in Cape Town circa 1830, and probably "berried" in London in mid to late Victorian times, when the practice of "berrying" was popular (this practice is unknown in Cape silver). Plain Georgian silver spoons were embossed and chased with fruit and foliate scrolls (Pickford, Silver Flatware, pg 70), and the bowl was gilded to complete the effect. The hallmarks are very clear, makers mark FW and pseudo English hallmarks (leopards head, date letter a, duty mark and lion passant), these are mark 163 (Cape silver by Welz). These are the same punches used earlier by Twentyman, Waldek took over Twentyman's shop and workshop in 1836.

Scottish Silver Toddy Ladle - Robert Gray   
Robert Gray & Sons, Glasgow 1835

A fine example of a Scottish Georgian Silver toddy ladle, by very fine makers. The ladle is Fiddle pattern, and is engraved with the initial C, in contempory style. Toddy ladles are uniquely Scottish, used for that "wee dram" of spirits, but also suitable as sauce ladles. The hallmarks are very clear and detailed (the tree, fish and bell in the Glasgow town mark are all visible), an additional "star" journeymans mark is also present. Robert Gray and Sons of Glasgow produced "some of the finest British silver of the period" (Walter Brown, Finial, June 2006). Silver by Gray can be found with both Glasgow and Edinburgh marks, as between 1784 and 1819 the Glasgow assay office was closed.

Silver Enamel Southern Rhodesia Teaspoon Set (6) - Cecil John Rhodes   
RB.S Ltd, Birmingham 1933

A boxed set of 6 silver enamel commemorative teaspoons, with enamel "Southern Rhodesia" with coat of arms, and cast bowls featuring "Rhodes Statue, Bulawayo". Cecil John Rhodes was a British empire builder, who obtained mineral rights in the territory later to bear his name in 1888. Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) was the name used for the British colony between 1901 and 1964. The spoons are in their original box, and were retailed by Birch & Gaydon, "Watchmakers to the Admiralty", of Fenchurch street, London. The hallmarks are clear on all spoons, although the makers mark (present but unidentified) is poorly struck and only partially visible.

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