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Canadian Silver Teaspoons (Set of 4) - John Ramage, Kingston Ontario
John Ramage, Kingston, Ontario 1851-1869
$ 280.00

A set of 4 Canadian silver teaspoons in the Fiddle pattern, made by John Ramage of Kingston, Ontario between 1851 and 1869. The spoons are quite large for teapoons, and a pleasing weight, around 18 grammes each. All 4 spoons have engraved original owners initials AW, in a beautiful flowing script, quite different to English engraving of the period, so distinctly Colonial. All 4 spoons are hallmarked with maker mark "J. Ramage" in rectangular punch, clear on one spoon, and some wear to the last few letters on the others. John Ramage Senior was a Scottish immigrant who arrived in Quebec in 1817 on the Prompt, he settled in Lanark County before moving to Edwardburg (source www.ramagefamilyhistory.com). Both John senior and his son (also John) were listed as "working silversmiths, jewellers, clockmakers and watchmakers" in Kingston, Ontario in 1857, at 63 Brock Street, before moving to Princess Street (source Langdon, Canadian Silversmiths 1700-1900, page 118).

Canadian Silver Tableforks (Pair) - Peter Bohle, Montreal, Quebec
Peter Bohle, Montreal, Quebec 1807-1853
$ 350.00

A pair of Canadian silver tableforks in the Fiddle pattern, with original owners script initials EB engraved on the back of the forks. The hallmarks on both forks are clear, and include pseudo lion passant (with a very thin body), pseudo oval Georgian duty mark, and makers mark PB for Peter Bohle. The lion passant is struck upside down on both forks, indicating the striking of marks was rather haphazard. Peter Bohle (1786 -1865) was the son of silversmith David Bohle, both his brothers (David & Francis) were also silversmiths. Peter was apprenticed to leading Canadian silversmith Robert Cruikshank for 7 years between 1800 and 1807, but spent his career working in Montreal, Quebec. He is known to have manufactured for the trade (sold to Savage & Lyman), he also partnered with Robert Hendery between 1853 and 1856 (Canadian Silversmiths 1700-1900, John Langdon, page 50). The family were German immigrants from Hanau (known for its silver industry).

Canadian Silver Tablespoons (Pair) - John Munro, Saint John, New Brunswick
John Munro, St. John, New Brunswick 1813-1875
$ 350.00

A Canadian Coin silver tablespoon pair in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved initial H. The spoons have excellent hallmarks, comprising of makers mark IM, NB for New Brunswick, and pseudo hallmarks lion passant, anchor and Georgian duty mark bust (this last one sideways). Canadian Maritime silversmiths of the early 19th century favoured imitation hallmarks, dictated by competition from imported English silver. St John silversmiths adopted the NB hallmark for New Brunswick, following their colleagues in Halifax (Langdon, pg 22). John Munro was born in 1791, and freed in 1813, he took over his father's shop in 1819. His premises were destroyed twice by fire, first in 1837 and again in 1874. He used a number of different pseudo marks, and also used IM and JM as makers marks (Donald Mackay, Silversmiths and Related Craftsmen of the Atlantic Provinces, page 107). Note - we earlier attributed this makers mark to James Melick, see details below, based on the book "Canadian Silversmiths 1700-1900, published 1966, pag...

Canadian Antique Silver Teaspoon - Savage, Lyman & Co   
Savage, Lyman & Co., Montreal, Quebec 1868-1879

A Canadian silver Fiddle pattern teaspoon, with an unusual gilded spoon bowl (gilded back and front of bowl), possibly for use as an egg spoon. The spoon has 2 interesting family crests, a raised fist holding a dagger and an envelope between 2 feathered wings, these are both very clear. The hallmarks are excellent, and include makers mark "SAVAGE.LYMAN & Co", pseudo Lion Rampant in circular punch, and pseudo duty mark in rectangular punch with canted corners. Joseph Savage and Theodore Lyman operated from Notre Dame Street, Montreal, between 1868 and 1879 when they were declared bankrupt. Their turnover suffered a major decline from $ 300000 to $ 90000 after the British Imperial forces were withdrawn from Montreal in 1870, so they must have catered to English clients. The firm was founded in 1818 by George Savage, who originally arrived in Canada as a soldier with Royal Welsh Fusiliers (Canadian silversmiths 1700-1900, John Langdon, pg 125, a book we highly recommend). Henry Birks, who founded the prestigious...

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