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Georgian Silver
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Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johann Voight   
Johann Voight, Cape C 1791
$ 470.00

A delightful Cape silver konfyt fork, one of the most charming we have seen. The fork is in the Hanoverian pattern, with turn up end, it has a form of feather edge engraving at the top of the handle, a long elegant stem (much longer than usual), and 3 tines. It has a v shaped drop, so overall quite different from many Cape silver konfyt forks. The fork is struck with makers mark IVC, this has no dots, the mark is clearly visible but the punch appears a little worn (hence the G being seen as a C). We believe this to be one of the marks used by Johann Voight, it is depicted in David Heller's book "History of Cape Silver", page 163. We have now confirmed 3 different IVG marks on Cape silver, which clearly come from 3 different punches, but probably come from 1 silversmith, or family of silversmiths as sons often took over the business of the father, and used the same punches. The other two IVG marks have different configurations of dots present, see Welz mark 171 with 2 dots, Welz described this maker as "unknow...

Baltimore Coin Silver Teaspoon - Samuel Kirk, Baltimore Assay Marks   
Samuel Kirk, Baltimore, Maryland 1824-1827
$ 200.00

An interesting coin silver American single struck Kings shape Thread and Shell pattern teaspoon, made by Samuel Kirk between 1824 and 1827. Whilst we describe this as a teaspoon, it is a large and heavy teaspoon, perfect for eating dessert. Single struck flatware means the pattern is only struck on one side, this only occurred in Scotland in the UK. The spoon has the original owners engraved family crest, a human head with full beard. The spoon has 3 hallmarks, makers mark S.Kirk in serrated rectangular punch for Samuel Kirk, Baltimore Coat of Arms large oval shield mark (quality mark), date letter C for 1824 - 1827, these are all well struck and clear. This dates to a very interesting period in US silver history, Baltimore between 1814 and 1830 was the only place and date where hallmarks were required on silver in the USA. The State Legislature of Maryland passed the Assay Act of 1814, which set the quality standard at 917, the Act was repealed in 1830 due to opposition by the affected silversmiths, includ...

Darlington Dog Show Antique Silver Jam Spoon   
Atkin Brothers, Sheffield 1912
$ 260.00

A Darlington Dog Show antique silver jam or marmalade spoon, presented as a trophy in 1912. The spoon is excellent quality, very good weight and feel in the hand, a pleasure to use. The traditional scalloped jam spade bowl has a circular embossed armorial or crest, with bulls head and covered wagons, surrounded by "DARLINGTON DOG SHOW", and the date 1912 engraved beneath. The spoon handle is also lovely, it appears to be a variant of the Windsor pattern (Ian Pickford, Silver Flatware, page 162. The hallmarks are very clear, the spoon also has a registration number meaning the design was protected by Atkin Brothers. The Darlington Dog Show dates back to 1860, when dogs were added to the Darlington Horse and Foal Society, it still exists today, see www.darlingtondogshowsociety.weebly.com. It has championship show status from the Kennel club, is held at Ripon race-track, events attract over 10000 dogs.

Georgian Silver Tablespoons (Pair) - Leopards Head Crest, Cusped Duty 1797   
Thomas Wallis, London 1797
$ 370.00

A lovely pair of Old English pattern tablespoons, with Leopards head family crest. The leopard is quite realistically engraved, and looks quite fierce. The hallmarks are excellent, as good as they could be, a journeyman's mark (the silversmith who made the spoons in the Wallis workshop) of 2 dots is also present. What is of interest about these hallmarks is the double cusp on the duty mark, to the right and base, this mark was only used between 6 July 1797 and 28 May 1798, 6 July being the date at which duty on silver was doubled from sixpence to one shilling. Jackson shows the 2 cusps to the left and base, this mark was never used on spoons, it was only used on tongs and knife blades that did not require the London town mark (Tony Dove, in an article entitled "The cusped duty used at the assay offices from 1797", in the Finial Vol. 14-04). 1797 was the first year a cusp was used, it was used again periodically when duty changed. The different assay offices applied the usage of cusps differently.

Cape Silver Tableforks (Pair) - Johannes Combrink, Anchor Hallmarks   
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1820
$ 300.00

A pair of Cape silver table forks, quite Colonial in character, with excellent Cape silver hallmarks. The forks are similar to Old English pattern with 4 tines, but have a wide flattened end and semi rounded stem, more continental in character than English. The forks have original engraved initials JR, this too is Colonial in style with bright cut flecks around the initials. The hallmarks on both forks are clear, crude anchor, makers mark IC, anchor, mark 22 in Cape Silver by Welz. One fork has 2 very old (and quite crude)repairs to both external tines, it looks like they were re-attached, now very secure. Despite the repair to one fork, we really like this pair, loads of character. We have dated these forks to early in Combrink's career, prior to the arrival of the English silversmiths in 1820.

Unique Fiddle Pattern Variant Silver Butter Knife - Thomas James, Fish Tail
Thomas James, London 1814
$ 470.00

A rare and possibly unique variant of the Fiddle pattern, with a "fish tail" insertion in the handle of a Georgian silver butter knife, made by Thomas James. The blade of the butter knife is nicely shaped and has attractive engraving, but it is the handle that stands out. The knife also has original owners engraved initials IH, in a floral font. The hallmarks including makers mark T.J are well struck and very clear, note the lack of a town mark. Ian Pickford, in his book Silver Flatware, shows a picture of a different but similar Fiddle Pattern variant (Fig 139 page 109), which he describes as "odd and quite possibly unique", made in 1826. Thomas James was freed in 1789, he worked until 1827, he was a small worker. He was a noted maker of caddy spoons, many of which also included this "fish tail" design, but found near the spoon bowl, not up the handle as per this example.

Irish Provincial Silver Teaspoon - Samuel Green, Cork, Laurence O'Hagan, Limerick
Samuel Green, Cork 1780-1812
$ 420.00

A rare Irish Provincial teaspoon in the Fiddle pattern, made in Cork by Samuel Green circa 1800, with a very rare Irish retailers mark. The teaspoon is quite long with a narrow bowl, and is hallmarked with incuse makers mark SG for Samuel Green, incuse STERLING guarantee mark, and retailers mark L.O.H in a rectangular punch, which is believed to be for Laurence O'Hagan, a watchmaker and presumably retailer in Limerick. Laurence O'Hagan, Watchmaker appears in the Hibernian Journal in 1791 on his marriage to Miss Quinn and again in 1804 on his marriage to Miss Bryan (source Silver Forums at 925-1000.com, on the Limerick and Irish Retailers marks pages). All the hallmarks are clear, especially the retailer mark, the G from STERLING is only partially struck. Irish provincial silver is quite rare, and often the hallmarks are worn or poorly punched, so this spoon is a nice example. Cork did not have an assay office, so the silversmiths adopted an unofficial STERLING mark to denote the 925 quality standard. This i...

Cape Silver Lemoen Lepel - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1814
$ 780.00

A Cape Silver lemoen lepel, (orange spoon), in very good condition, and with very clear makers mark. This spoon is typical of the Cape lemoen lepels, with pointed terminal and bowl, the bowl itself eye shaped and quite deep. The spoon has typical Cape engraving, with a 4 petal flower and wrigglework along the edges of the handles. It also has a distinctive V joint connecting handle to bowl. The IC makers mark is well struck and clear (Welz mark 32 with canted corners). Welz describes orange spoons as"probably the most attractive type of spoon made at the Cape, derived from Dutch spoons", pg 95. He also notes that all known examples are by Cape born silversmiths of the early 19th century (so not made by the more prolific English immigrants who arrived after 1815). As far as we are aware, only Jan Lotter and Johannes combrink made lemoen lepels, probably between 1800 and 1815. Note - this spoon matches the pair S 1922.

Georgian Silver Madeira Wine Label - Unregistered Makers Mark
Thomas Phipps & Edward Robinson, London 1805
$ 280.00

A Georgian silver wine label, with original engraving for Madeira, by the Phipps family of silversmiths, who have been described as one of the best known London firms producing labels (Wine Labels 1730-2003, page 168). The label is rectangular with fully rounded ends, and has a reeded border (note this is classified as a rectangular label rather than an oval label, which are more eye shaped (Wine labels page 51). The label has 2 holes for the suspensory rings connected to the original chain. The label is also engraved with original owners initials RB on the back just above the hallmarks. The hallmarks are very crisp and clear, they could not be better, the detail of hair on the duty mark and mane on the lion passant are clearly visible. The makers mark is interesting, TP over ER in quatrefoil punch, without pellets. This is an unregistered punch, not recorded in Grimwade (London Goldsmiths 1697-1837), Phipps and Robinson usual registered punch, similar but with clearly defined pellets, Grimwade 2891, used bet...

Dutch Silver Lodereindoosje / Vinaigrette - HE. DAT IS LIEF
Utrecht C 1821
$ 780.00

An antique Dutch silver gilt vinaigrette (zilveren lodereindoosje) in the form of an armoire (kabinet). These have also been described as pomanders, scent boxes, and also incorrectly described as snuff boxes and peppermint boxes. The box has a curved shaped front, and the back panel has the impressed words "HE. DAT IS LIEF", translated He that is love", so probably presented as a love token. The armoire has frontal doors with floral decoration, and 3 drawers below, the back and side panels also have floral decoration. The lid is decorated with an angel reaching up to pluck fruit, with trees in the background, the figure is quite crude, almost as if drawn by a young child. The base is engraved with original owners initials HDV. The hallmarks include Lion Passant 2nd Purity for 833 grade silver (inside main box), and the rim has makers mark AM over 3 dots in rectangular punch (or WV below 3 dots), we have not been able to identify this maker, all assistance welcome. The rim also has Minerva head duty mark (off...

Aberdeen Silver Tablespoon - Peter Ross
Peter Ross, Aberdeen 1819-1822
$ 230.00

A Scottish Provincial silver tablespoon, made in Aberdeen by Peter Ross between 1819 and 1822. The spoon is Fiddle pattern, and has original owners engraved initials AGC. The hallmarks are clear. The hallmarks include makers mark PR between two A hallmarks for Aberdeen. Ross was admitted as an Aberdeen hammerman in 1819, but only lived for 3 more years until 1822 (Aberdeen Silver by Michael Wilson). His legacy is Fiddle pattern flatware, he is not known to have produced other silver items. Note - We have a matching pair of tablespoons S 1891.

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johannes Casparus Lotter
Johannes Casparus Lotter, Cape 1811-1823
$ 290.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Old English pattern, with 3 tines. The fork has engraved original owners initials MMR, quite quaintly engraved, possibly by an amateur. The makers mark is very well struck and very clear, makers initials ICL between 2 floral devices with 7 petals (Welz mark 78, page 150). Lotter worked at the Cape between 1811 and his death in 1823, he shared a name with his father Johannes Casparus Lotter, who was also a silversmith (12 members of the Lotter family practised as silversmiths).

Cape Silver Tableforks (Set of 5) - Willem Lotter
Willem Godfried Lotter, Cape 1810-1835
$ 780.00

A set of 5 Fiddle pattern Cape silver tableforks, made by Willem Lotter. The forks are quite long and elegant, with bevelled edges, quite attractive and pleasing quality. All 5 forks are struck with makers mark WGL in irregular punch between 2 oval devices (Welz mark 88). Welz depicts this mark as a face, we are not convinced, this requires further research. Willem Gotfried Lotter worked between 1810 and 1835, his father (also Willem Gotfried) was also a silversmith, they shared the same punches. Lotter died in Richmond, which was established as a spa town for sufferers of tuberculosis.

Cape Silver Dessert Spoon - Johannes Lotter
Johannes Casparus Lotter, Cape C 1800
$ 230.00

An early Cape silver Fiddle pattern dessert spoon, by one of the most highly renowned Cape Silversmiths, Johannes Casparus Lotter (I). The spoon has an engraved family crest of a bird (possibly a dove), this is well engraved. The hallmarks are excellent, and include makers mark .JCL struck twice in between 3 floral devices with 7 petals. This particular combination of marks is not illustrated by Welz in his book Cape Silver and Silversmiths, it is a combination of marks 76 (a distinctive .JCL maker mark), only used by Johannes Casparus Lotter (I), and mark 78, where the 7 petal floral device is used by his son Johannes Casparus Lotter (II). These hallmarks are particularly well struck, so much so that damage to the bottom left corner of the makers mark punch .JCL can clearly be seen. This leads us to believe the punch was well worn, and given this is a Fiddle pattern spoon we can assume this spoon was made towards the end of his career. Given the floral device has only been recorded in work by his son Johanne...

Irish Georgian Silver Serving Spoons (Pair) - William Ward, Dublin
William Ward, Dublin 1805
$ 310.00

A pair of Georgian Irish silver serving spoons, made by William Ward of Dublin. The spoons are Fiddle pattern, we have described them as serving spoons as they are noticeably larger than tablespoons, very suitable for use as serving spoons. The spoons both have an interesting engraved family crest, a hand above heart, this is well engraved. The hallmarks are clear on both spoons, makers mark W.W (mark 580 in Irish Silver by Douglas Bennett, page 180), date letter I for 1805, and Hibernia and Harp Crowned in rectangular punches with canted corners. Note the absence of a duty mark, which only came into use in 1807 in Ireland. William Ward was a noted spoonmaker, he was freed in 1774 and died in 1822.

Baltimore Coin Silver Tablespoon - Samuel Kirk, Baltimore Assay Marks
Samuel Kirk, Baltimore, Maryland 1822
$ 280.00

An interesting coin silver American Fiddle pattern tablespoon, made by Samuel Kirk in 1822. The spoon has original owners script initials JMC. The spoon has 4 hallmarks, makers mark S.Kirk in script in rectangular punch for Samuel Kirk, Baltimore Coat of Arms shield mark in clipped corner rectangle (quality mark), date letter F for 1822 and Head of Liberty mark. This dates to a very interesting period in US silver history, Baltimore between 1814 and 1830 was the only place and date where hallmarks were required on silver in the USA. The State Legislature of Maryland passed the Assay Act of 1814, which set the quality standard at 917, the Act was repealed in 1830 due to opposition by the affected silversmiths, including Kirk, who petitioned for its repeal. Thomas Warner was the Baltimore Assayer between 1814 and 1823, so he would have struck these marks. Samuel Kirk began working as a silversmith 1815, he founded the very successful firm of S. Kirk & Sons in 1846, it became the oldest surviving silversmithing ...

Georgian Novelty Silver Articulated Fish Vinaigrette - Lea & Co
William Lea & Co, Birmingham 1817
$ 3 100.00

A rare Georgian silver novelty articulated fish vinaigrette, made by William Lea & Co in Birmingham, 1817. The fish has 6 separate articulated sections, and a hinged lid (fish head) that opens to reveal an oval gilded vinaigrette, with scrolling grille which opens to reveal the gilded sponge compartment. The open mouth contains a suspensory silver ring, to allow the vinaigrette to be attached via a chain. The vinaigrette is beautifully engraved, with scales, fins and eyes, the tail and top fin are also realistically engraved. The hallmarks on the tail are very clear, the grille is also hallmarked. William Lea & Co worked between 1811 and 1825, they focused on small novelty items. A number of these fish vinaigrettes by Lea and Co are known, featuring 2 different engraving styles. An almost identical vinaigrette, also made by Lea & Co in 1817, is featured on the Bourdan Smith website (www.bourdansmith.co.uk), incorrectly described as reticulated, has very similar engraving to this one. Another example, made a y...

Dutch Silver Lodereindoosje / Vinaigrette -Amsterdam 1809, Dirk Goedhart
Dirk Goedhart, Amsterdam 1809
$ 310.00

An antique Dutch silver lodereindoosje, made in Amsterdam in 1809. The english translation would be vinaigrette, pomander of scent box. The box is in the form of an armoire (kabinet) in traditional shape, with domed lid and shaped doors, decorated with swags and urns, with drawers in the base. The sides and lid are decorated with traditional Dutch scenes, the lid a man with angel alongside tree and horse, the back with a couple in horse drawn cart, and the sides with women churning butter and carrying milk. The base has original owners engraved initials P.V.I., nicely engraved. The hallmarks on the base are clear, and include date letter b for 1809, Amsterdam town mark of 3 crosses without crown (only used between 1807 and 1812 during Kingdom of Holland period). The 3rd mark is 10, the 10 penningen silver standard mark (833/1000), see "Netherlands Responsibility Marks from 1797" page 37, and the 4th mark is makers mark of a heart under device, this mark is slightly worn. This is the mark of Dirk Goedhart, so ...

Dutch Antique Silver Empire Sugar Sifter (Zilveren Strooilepel) - Pieter Kuijlenburg, Schoonhoven
Pieter Kuijlenburg, Schoonhoven 1830
$ 330.00

A lovely Dutch silver sugar sifter in the Empire style, made by Pieter Kuijlenburg in Schoonhoven in 1830. The sifter ladle has a wide oval curved bowl, quite deep, with a beaded rim, and intricate piercing of the bowl. The centre is an eight pointed star, with 8 radiating arrows interspersed with patterned dots, surrounded by a cross and semi circle pattern. The curved, elegant handle has a pointed terminal, it is beautifully engraved with a bright cut pattern, including stems with leaves and flowers. The Empire style is a Neo-Classical revival style, that became popular in France, Belgium and the Netherlands after the rise of Napoleon. The hallmarks include makers mark PKB under kappie for Pieter Kuijlenburg, Lion passant 2nd standard (833 purity), Minerva head duty mark, and date letter script V for 1830 (the date letter struck inside the bowl). Kuijlenburg worked in Schoonhoven as a silversmith between 1818 and 1831, he was born in 1791 and died in 1868, he had 6 children including Adrianus who was also a...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Oltman Ahlers
Oltman Ahlers, Cape 1810-1827
$ 310.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Old English pattern, with 3 tines. The fork is hallmarked with makers mark OA in oval punch, this is faintly struck but still visible, between two square devices with 4 dots, these are both clearly struck ( Welz mark 2). Ahlers worked as a silversmith between 1810 and his death in 1827. He married the widow of silversmith Jan Brevis, which may have facilitated his entry into the trade. He was the son of Oltman Alders of Germany, his mother was Dorothea of Bengal, who presumably arrived in the Cape as a slave. His silver is quite scarce.

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