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Georgian Silver
Records 1 to 285 of 285
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Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Oltman Ahlers   
Oltman Ahlers, Cape 1810-1827
$ 310.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Old English pattern, with 3 tines. The fork is hallmarked with makers mark OA in oval punch, this is faintly struck but still visible, between two square devices with 4 dots, these are both clearly struck ( Welz mark 2). Ahlers worked as a silversmith between 1810 and his death in 1827. He married the widow of silversmith Jan Brevis, which may have facilitated his entry into the trade. He was the son of Oltman Alders of Germany, his mother was Dorothea of Bengal, who presumably arrived in the Cape as a slave. His silver is quite scarce.

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Two) - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 310.00

Two Cape silver tablespoons (not a pair), but both in Old English pattern and both by Johannes Combrink. The first has engraved owners initials JM in script, this spoon has excellent hallmarks, makers mark IC and the anchor (Welz mark 25), and a rounded drop. It also has the initials AFDT struck on the back of the stem, we assume another owner. The second has a slightly wider handle, no initials, and very clear makers mark IC (Welz mark 32).

Cape Silver Convex Snuff Box - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 1 500.00

An interesting Cape silver snuff box, an unusual convex shape which gives it a lovely feel in the hand and pocket. The box has a part hinged lid, as is usual with this form, with just a slight overlap creating the thumbpiece. The decoration is typically Cape, a 8 petalled flower with wrigglework border, which is extremely well preserved due to the shape of the lid. The box also has original owners engraved initials AWJP, also with wrigglework border. The hinge is also decorated with cross hatch engraving. The original gilt interior is a lemon yellow colour, and the IC makers mark struck in the lid is very clear and distinct ( Welz mark 32). Convex shaped snuff boxes, given the more challenging construction in relation to the rectangular boxes, are rare in the Cape, this demonstrates that Combrink was a master craftsman.

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Marthinus Lourens Smith
Marthinus Lourens Smith, Cape C 1800
$ 390.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Fiddle pattern, with 3 tines. The fork has the original owners initials PJS, quite quaintly engraved in Colonial style.The fork has excellent hallmarks, they could not be better. They include makers mark MLS and the leaf device, with the veins clearly visible (Welz mark 117). Smith was a Dane who arrived in the Cape as a VOC employee in 1757 aged 35, he died in 1806. He led an interesting life, he married 4 times, and had 10 children.

Irish Silver Rat Tail Dessert Spoons (Set of 6) - James Brady, Dublin, Neill, Belfast
James Brady, Dublin 1834
$ 560.00

A set of 6 Irish silver dessert spoons, in the Fiddle pattern with rat-tails, a feature of Irish flatware of the period. The spoons have original owners engraved initials WMH. The hallmarks on all 6 are excellent, and include makers mark IB for James Brady, who worked between 1821 and 1842. The spoons also have the retailer's mark, NEILL, which is very clear on all the spoons. Irish retailers were among the first to mark flatware, early adopters of corporate branding. NEILL was a leading Belfast retailer, first established by Robert Neill in 1803, the firm survived until 1960.

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Set of 6) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 940.00

A set of 6 Old English pattern Cape silver tablespoons, made by Johannes Combrink. All 6 spoons have engraved owners initials G, we assume the original owner. This set has been made by hand, there are slight differences in length, also differences in the shape of the handle, with some having narrower ends. One spoon also has a noticeably larger bowl than the other 5, so perhaps made at a different time. The drop on 2 spoons is also slightly longer, overall interesting but subtle differences between the spoons. The hallmarks also exhibit differences, three spoons are struck with makers mark IC three times, the other three are struck with makers mark IC four times (similar to the English duty dodgers). The orientation of the marks also differs, some are struck vertically and some sideways, so it appears the silversmith struck marks quite randomly. This mark is 29 or mark 30 in the book Cape Silver by Welz, the C is quite close the the I, and has short arms, almost looks like a K. The slightly larger spoon, whic...

Irish Silver Claret Wine Label - Benjamin Taitt
Benjamin Taitt, Dublin C 1785
$ 740.00

An Irish silver wine label engraved CLARET, made by Benjamin Taitt in Dublin circa 1785. The label has a curved rectangular shape, with an attractive bright cut and wiggle work border, and original chain. This particular form of label is uniquely Irish, English examples of this type curved up, only Irish labels curve down. The Claret engraving is quirky, done by hand and rougher than London examples of the time. The hallmarks are excellent, and include makers mark BT in a serrated oblong, harp crowned in a irregular shaped punch (so pre 1786) and Hibernia in an oval punch (used before 1793). A very similar label, also by Taitt, is depicted in the book Wine Labels 1730-2003, pg 279, figure 927, for W-WINE, described as circa 1785-1790 so the dates match. The same book describes Taitt as "arguably the most innovative of Irish wine label makers, a particularly successful exponent of bright-cut engraving". He made the famous balloon label, only one of which is known, pg 82, and he worked between 1775 and 1800.

Georgian Parcel Gilt Silver Purse/ Handbag Vinaigrette - Ledsam & Vale
Ledsam & Vale, Birmingham 1820
$ 1 550.00

An interesting silver gilt Georgian vinaigrette, in the shape of a purse or handbag, the body decorated with chased 3 leaf device, which has been described as a trefoil design in the literature. The shape is lovely, very pleasing to hold, and with the texture has good grip. The quality is excellent, certainly made by a master craftsman. The base has a leaf design around oval eye. The lid is also beautifully decorated, a central flower on finely engraved cross-hatch surrounded by pattern border, and the side of the lid has a fruiting vine border, very delicately chased. The vinaigrette has 2 eyelets which holds the original chain, each chain link is also decorated with a bar pattern. The pierced grille has a foliate design, also engraved, both hinges are perfect. The interior gilding is also perfect. The vinaigrette has clear hallmarks, the lid has Georgian duty mark, very clear makers mark L&Co which is struck upside-down, and lion passant. The base has anchor town mark, partially worn makers mark and a very ...

Cape Silver Lemoen Lepels (Pair) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1814
$ 1 550.00

A fabulous pair of Cape Silver lemoen lepels, (orange spoons), in excellent condition, and with very clear makers mark. The spoons are typical of the Cape lemoen lepels, with pointed terminal and bowl, the bowl itself eye shaped and quite deep. The spoons have typical Cape engraving, with a 4 petal flower and wrigglework along the edges of the handles. They also have a distinctive V joint connecting handle to bowl, the 2 v joints are quite different in angle and style, reflecting their hand-made character. The IC makers mark on both spoons is well struck and clear (Welz mark 32 with canted corners). Welz describes orange spoons as"probably the most attractive type of spoon made at the Cape, derived from Dutch spoons", pg 95. He also notes that all known examples are by Cape born silversmiths of the early 19th century (so not made by the more prolific English immigrants who arrived after 1815). As far as we are aware, only Jan Lotter and Johannes combrink made lemoen lepels, probably between 1800 and 1815.

Philadelphia Coin Silver Spoon - John Townsend
John Townsend, Philadelphia C 1820
$ 290.00

A rare Philadelphia coin silver teaspoon, in the American Fiddle pattern, made by John Townsend. The spoon has original owners script initials engraved on both sides, ALH on the front and AH on the back. The makers mark J.TOWNSEND in rectangular punch is clearly struck, this is a rare makers mark, not illustrated in the book "Philadelphia Silversmiths and related Artisans to 1861", by Catherine Hollan, which has over 3800 entries. The punch itself is interesting, the letters are not quite properly aligned, with the E lower than the S, so perhaps the punch itself was home made. John Townsend was born in 1789 in Pennsylvania, he was listed as a jeweller, clockmaker and watchmaker, he worked between 1811 and 1860. His son John K Townsend was born in 1809, he practised as a watchmaker and dentist, first in Philadelphia and later in Washington. Philadelphia was the largest silver market in the USA between 1760 and 1820. Our interest in this particular spoon is that Townsend shares a name with Cape Silversmith John...

Old English Feather Edge & Cartouche Silver Tablespoons (Pair) - Nalder Family Crest
William Pinder, London 1771
$ 560.00

A pair of rare Old English Feather Edge and Cartouche silver tablespoons, made by William Pinder in 1771. The spoons are lovely quality and in excellent condition, we really like these spoons. The cartouche has been chased and engraved by hand, you can see small differences between the 2, notably the size and orientation of the scroll underneath. The cartouches are engraved with a family crest, a Griffin's head erased, this is the family crest of the Nalder Family (Fairbairns crests). Whilst Old English Feather Edge is a common pattern, the addition of the Cartouche, first produced around 1770 by Thomas Northcote, is rare (Silver Flatware, Ian Pickford, page 105). The pattern was revived late 19th century by Carrington, who called it Carrington Shield. The hallmarks are bottom marked, and include clear makers mark WP, with the W and P co-joined for William Pinder, who worked from Bunhill road between 1770 and 1784 (Grimwade page 624). The crowned leopards head and lion passant are partially worn but still cle...

Dutch Silver Lodereindoosje / Vinaigrette - He. Dat Is Lief - Adrianus Kiujlenburg, Schoonhoven
Adrianus Kuijlenburg, Schoonhoven 1816
$ 940.00

An antique Dutch silver gilt vinaigrette (zilveren lodereindoosje) in the form of an armoire (kabinet). These have also been described as pomanders, scent boxes, and also incorrectly described as snuff boxes and peppermint boxes. The box has a curved shaped front, and the back panel has the impressed words "HE. DAT IS LIEF", translated He that is love", so probably presented as a love token. The armoire has frontal doors with floral decoration, and 3 drawers below, the back and side panels also have floral decoration. The lid has an oval panel with seated figure of justice holding sword and scales, surrounded by a wreath. The base is engraved with original owners initials T:V:V, the base also has a clear makers mark of AK under flower (Adrianus Kuijlenburg of Schoonhoven, 1812 -1816, see Nederlands Responsibility Marks since 1797 no 897). The lid has a Minerva head office mark (duty mark), and the box interior rim has the Lion Passant 2nd purity for 833 grade silver and date letter G for 1816. Loderein comes...

Antique Silver Five Barred Gate Sherry Wine Label - Edward Barnard & Sons
Edward, Edward Jn, John & William Barnard, London C 1835
$ 460.00

An interesting antique cast silver wine label, pierced for SHERRY, made by the Barnard family of silversmiths. This design is called the "Five Barred Gate", the 5 bars are surrounded by grapes, vines and tendrils. This label is of particular interest as it is upside-down, the central vine leaf is usually on top, here it is underneath. The label is quite balanced so it is not easy to see it is upside-down, so an easy mistake for the engraver who did the piercing and applied the chain to make. The five barred gate design was first produced circa 1820 by Emes & Barnard, it remained popular for 30 years, and was copied by a number of other silversmiths, including Reily & Storer (Wine Labels 1730-2003, page 35, Fig 37, where a Port label is displayed the correct way up, also page 156, F Champagne). A number of other examples, all the correct way up, can be seen on the Steppes Hill website (www.steppeshillfarmantiques.com), all by the Barnards, dating between 1823 and 1830. Another version of this label is depicted...

Regency Silver Sauce Boat - Emes & Barnard
Rebecca Emes & Edward Barnard I, London 1820
$ 1 600.00

A Regency silver sauce boat, by the highly respected firm of Emes and Barnard. The sauce boat is the traditional shape, with leaf capped flying scroll handle, 3 shell and hoof feet, and heavy cast gadroon border. The boat is a generous size and weight, over 330 grammes, this is a good quality sauce boat, as you would expect from these makers. The boat has a lovely engraved family crest, a church with spire, with crosses on the roof and spire. The hallmarks are very clear, including makers mark RE over EB and date letter e for 1820. Rebecca Emes was married to John Emes, who was in partnership with the Chawners, he died in 1808 and Rebecca became a partner. Edward Barnard rose from workshop manager to full partner, also in 1808. Emes and Barnard was one of the most successful London silver businesses in its day, they supplied many leading retailers, including Rundell, Bridge and Rundell. Barnard was joined by his 3 sons, Culme describes Edward Barnard & Sons as an important firm, the oldest manufacturing silve...

Canadian Silver Tableforks (Pair) - Peter Bohle, Montreal, Quebec
Peter Bohle, Montreal, Quebec 1807-1853
$ 390.00

A pair of Canadian silver tableforks in the Fiddle pattern, with original owners script initials EB engraved on the back of the forks. The hallmarks on both forks are clear, and include pseudo lion passant (with a very thin body), pseudo oval Georgian duty mark, and makers mark PB for Peter Bohle. The lion passant is struck upside down on both forks, indicating the striking of marks was rather haphazard. Peter Bohle (1786 -1865) was the son of silversmith David Bohle, both his brothers (David & Francis) were also silversmiths. Peter was apprenticed to leading Canadian silversmith Robert Cruikshank for 7 years between 1800 and 1807, but spent his career working in Montreal, Quebec. He is known to have manufactured for the trade (sold to Savage & Lyman), he also partnered with Robert Hendery between 1853 and 1856 (Canadian Silversmiths 1700-1900, John Langdon, page 50). The family were German immigrants from Hanau (known for its silver industry).

Aberdeen Silver Tablespoons (Pair) - Peter Ross
Peter Ross, Aberdeen 1819-1822
$ 470.00

A pair of Scottish Provincial silver tablespoons, made in Aberdeen by Peter Ross between 1819 and 1822. The spoons are Fiddle pattern, and have original owners engraved initials AGC. The spoons are in lovely condition, well preserved, and the hallmarks are clear. The hallmarks include makers mark PR between two A hallmarks for Aberdeen. Ross was admitted as an Aberdeen hammerman in 1819, but only lived for 3 more years until 1822 (Aberdeen Silver by Michael Wilson). His legacy is Fiddle pattern flatware, he is not known to have produced other silver items. Note - We have a matching single tablespoon S 1892.

Irish Provincial Limerick Hook End Soup Ladle - Joseph Johns
Joseph Johns, Limerick C 1760
$ 6 550.00

An extremely rare Irish Provincial silver soup ladle from Limerick, made by Joseph Johns, Limericks "most accomplished, prolific and arguably most successful silversmith" (A Celebration of Limerick Silver, John Bowen & Conor O'Brien, pages 140 & 198 - a book we highly recommend). The ladle is in the Rococo style, with a fluted bowl and asymmetrical chased floral decoration on the handle and back of bowl, and has a hooked terminal (or end, described as a "crooked end" by Bennett - Irish Silver, pg 115). The ladle also has an engraved family crest, an armoured arm embowed holding an arrow. The bowl, which is fluted on both sides, is huge, over 10 cms in diameter, this is a substantial ladle with a good gauge. The fluted bowl was described by Douglas Bennett as "an alluring feature feature for the collector" (Collecting Irish Silver, pg 115). The join of bowl to handle has character, the drop has worn engraving, and also a semi circular strengthening plate, which unfortunately was not strong enough to prevent da...

18th Century Dutch Silver Hanoverian 3 Pronged Forks - Hendrik Kamerlingh II
Hendrik Kamerlingh II, Amsterdam C 1730-1740
$ 660.00

A lovely set of 5 18th century Dutch silver Hanoverian pattern 3 pronged forks, with a matching 6th fork made slightly later by another maker, we assume to replace a loss shortly after they were made. The forks are quite plain and elegant, with turn down ends, and a prominent drop and pip, the "Amsterdam Lofje", characteristic of spoons and forks from Amsterdam. The forks have no engraving or monograms. All the forks have makers mark HK in script for Hendrik Kamerlingh II, who worked between 1730 and 1776, and Amsterdam town mark (crown above 3 crosses). The 6th fork has makers mark HO for Hendrik Overhulsman, who worked between 1790 and 1811, also with Amsterdam town mark. All 6 makers and town marks are slightly squashed, this is usual on 18th century bottom marked flatware as the spoon maker would have re-hammered the stems after return from the assay office, as the stem would bulge when the marks were struck. All 6 forks have an additional hallmark, V in shield under a crown, this is a Dutch tax mark used...

Irish Georgian Silver Table Spoons (Set of 4) - Samuel Neville, Dublin
Samuel Neville, Dublin 1805
$ 470.00

A set of 4 Irish Georgian silver tablespoons in the Fiddle pattern, made by Samuel Neville of Dublin. The spoons have no initials or engraving, and no signs of removal. The hallmarks on all 4 spoons are excellent, all individually struck. They include makers mark SN, Hibernia, Crowned Harp and date letter I for 1805. Samuel Neville worked between 1795 and 1851, he was a respected member of the community, he was Warden between 1804 and 1807 and was also elected to the Dublin City Council in 1807. He was Master in 1807 and 1827.

Cape Silver Tablespoon and Tablefork Set (8, 4 of each) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 1 250.00

A set of 8 Cape Silver tablespoons and table forks (4 of each) in the Old English pattern, all with original owners engraved initials JM in script. The forks are lovely, long and elegant, and in great condition, the spoons have seen more use, with wear to the bowls. The spoons have wide circular drops, more continental in style. Six pieces (4 spoons and 2 forks) have additional initials AFDT engraved on the back of the stems, we assume an earlier owner, the AFDT showing signs of wear. Seven items have excellent hallmarks (makers mark IC and crude anchor, Welz mark 25), one fork has different marks, makers mark IC struck with a worn punch (Welz mark 29) and what appears to be crowned leopards head (clearly struck but worn punch, outline clear but no detail). Combrink had a long career, and this IC mark with worn punch is well known, it is assumed the punch became worn over time. The crowned leopard town mark is more of a mystery, this punch was used by Twentyman and Waldek (Welz 135 and 163), and is unknown by...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork -Johan Anton Bunning   
Johan Anton Bunning?, Cape C 1800
$ 350.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Fiddle pattern, with 3 tines. The tines are different from most konfyt forks, these are quite fat, widely spaced and short (3.3. cm). The fork has original owners initials TFM, the engraving in an unusual script, quite pleasing overall. The fork has makers mark I.B in oval punch, with the I and B co-joined. This is depicted in the book "Cape Silver and Silversmiths" by Stephan Welz as mark 20, page 146, for Johan Anton Bunning, a German soldier who arrived in the Cape in 1758 and died in 1793. He mark is confirmed as he made silver for the Dutch Reformed Church, whose records confirm him as maker, but the Fiddle pattern style of the fork is problematic, as it was only introduced circa 1800, so it is unlikely he made this fork. A number of alternatives exist, it could have been made by a son (Cape silversmiths regularly carried on using punches created by fathers). More likely is that this is the mark of another Cape silversmith, whose mark has not yet been attributed. IB or JB...

Baltimore Coin Silver Tablespoons (Pair) - Samuel Kirk, Baltimore Assay Marks
Samuel Kirk, Baltimore, Maryland 1824-1826
$ 470.00

A fabulous pair of Baltimore silver tablespoons, in the Kings pattern, by Samuel Kirk of Baltimore, and bearing Baltimore assay marks for 1824-1826. The spoons are very good quality and gauge, unlike many American spoons of the period, which were often thinner and lighter than their English counterparts. They are single struck (in Scottish fashion), the back of both spoons is engraved Lyon, we assume the original owner. In addition to makers mark S.Kirk in script in rectangular punch, the spoons have the oval Baltimore Coat of Arms quality mark, in rectangular punch with cut corners, and date letter C, used by Assay Master LeRoy Atkinson between 1824 and 1826 (see www.imperialhalfbushel.com for information on these marks). These date to an interesting period in American silver history, Baltimore between 1814 and 1830 was the only place and date where hallmarks were required on silver in the USA, following the passing of the Assay Act by the State Legislature of Maryland in 1814 (it was unpopular so repealed i...

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Pair 2) - Cape Regiment, Bugle, Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1817
$ 620.00

A rare pair of Cape silver tablespoons in the Old English pattern, engraved with the crest of the Cape Regiment. The spoons are engraved "CAPE.REG" above a bugle, suspended from a shamrock shape rope knot. This bugle was used as a crest for English Light regiments, currently still used by the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (lightbobs). As is often the case with regimental silver, these spoons have been well used (and well polished), so the crest is worn, one is better than the other. Both spoons have clear Cape silver hallmarks, anchor, IC, anchor, mark 22 in Cape Silver by Welz, used by Johannes Combrink. The Cape Regiment was formed in 1795, and consisted of Khoisan and Coloured men under white officers, headquartered in Simonstown. In 1817 it was renamed the Cape Corps, it remained in existence until 1926. Major Matthew Richmond, a New Zealand Colonial administrator and politician, served with the Cape Regiment in 1817, so may have used these spoons. (note - we have 2 sets of these spoons)....

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Pair 1) - Cape Regiment, Bugle, Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1817
$ 700.00

A rare pair of Cape silver tablespoons in the Old English pattern, engraved with the crest of the Cape Regiment. The spoons are engraved "CAPE.REG" above a bugle, suspended from a shamrock shape rope knot. This bugle was used as a crest for English Light regiments, currently still used by the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (lightbobs). As is often the case with regimental silver, these spoons have been well used (and well polished), so the crest is worn, one is better than the other. Both spoons have clear Cape silver hallmarks, anchor, IC, anchor, mark 22 in Cape Silver by Welz, used by Johannes Combrink. The Cape Regiment was formed in 1795, and consisted of Khoisan and Coloured men under white officers, headquartered in Simonstown. In 1817 it was renamed the Cape Corps, it remained in existence until 1926. Major Matthew Richmond, a New Zealand Colonial administrator and politician, served with the Cape Regiment in 1817, so may have used these spoons. (note - we have 2 sets of these spoons)....

Georgian Silver Chamberstick - Fletcher Family Crest
John & James Settle, Sheffield 1822
$ 1 650.00

A lovely Georgian silver chamberstick, of good quality and gauge, that is still in excellent condition. The pan is circular but with an octagonal design, the border has alternating devices (one floral, one more rectangular). The candle nozzle is also octagonal, with a column design. The flying scroll handle has a cast thumb-piece with engraved family crest, and slot for holding the companion extinguisher. The chamberstick also has its original detachable conical extinguisher (sometimes called dunce cap extinguisher) with acorn finial, this is also engraved with the same family crest, its attachment has the same floral motif as on the pan. The hallmarks are very clear on both pan and extinguisher, and include Sheffield hallmarks for 1822 and makers mark I&J.S. for John and James Settle, who worked between 1814 and 1824. A number of impressive pieces by these makers have survived, including a pair of impressive wine coolers that can be seen on the Rau website (www.rauantiques.com). The crest , a "demi-lion ram...

Early Georgian Rococo Sterling Silver Sauce Boat - Richard Pargeter, Alleyn Family Crest, Lidsel Family
Richard Pargeter, London 1737
$ 2 250.00

A fabulous early Georgian (George II) silver sauce boat, one of the best we have seen. The sauce boat is an exceptional size and quality, tipping the scales at 492 grammes (17.4 ounces), and is wider and shallower than later examples. The sauce boat has Rococo decoration, with engraved swirling shells, flowers and scrolls, it also has an intricate diamond pattern which is also hand engraved. The 3 cast shell feet are also fabulous, with a scroll between shell foot and shell attachment. The leaf capped double scroll handle has also been cast and applied. The sauce boat has a Rococo family armorial (3 wheat sheaves and a cross) on one side and a family crest on the other, consisting of a lion rampant holding 2 wheat stalks. The Sable a cross potent is the Alleyn family, in this case the arms of the wife, we have not yet identified the arms of the husband. It may possibly be the Lidsel family from Essex, Gules three garbs argent. This sauce boat is accompanied with the Heraldic report identifying the Alleyn fami...

Dutch Silver Lodereindoosje / Vinaigrette - Schoonhoven, Johannes Smits
Johannes Jacobus Smits, Schoonhoven 1823
$ 390.00

An antique Dutch silver vinaigrette (zilveren lodereindoosje) in the form of an armoire (kabinet). These have also been described as pomanders, scent boxes, and also incorrectly described as snuff boxes and peppermint boxes. The box is rectangular in shape, with an engraved armoire, complete with drawers, it also has a pierced rim on the lid. The back is decorated with an engraved flower, while the base, sides and lid have engraved wrigglework decoration. The lid is clearly hallmarked with maker mark IS under star (makers mark 10121 in the book "Netherlands Responsibility Marks since 1797") for Johannes Jacobus Smits, who worked in Schoonhoven between 1823 and 1824. The lid also has a very clear date letter O for 1823. The rim of the box also has makers mark and Minerva head office mark (duty mark). Loderein comes from the French "l'eau de reine" translated "water of the king", as only the wealthy could afford the perfumed cologne.

Irish Georgian Silver Dessert Spoons (Set of 6) - Samuel Neville
Samuel Neville, Dublin 1804
$ 600.00

A set of 6 Irish Georgian silver dessert spoons in the Fiddle pattern, made by Samuel Neville of Dublin in 1804. The spoons have no initials or engraving, and no signs of removal. All 6 spoons have good hallmarks, makers mark SN for Samuel Neville (struck both ways). They also have Hibernia and Harp Crowned, and date letter H for 1804 (note absence of duty mark, only introduced in Ireland in 1807). Samuel Neville worked between 1795 and 1851, he was a respected member of the community, he was Warden between 1804 and 1807 and was also elected to the Dublin City Council in 1807. He was Master in 1807 and 1827.

Scottish Provincial Silver Shell Teaspoons (set of 8) - Perth, James Stobie, John Pringle
James Stobie & John Pringle, Perth C 1830
$ 840.00

A rare set of 8 Scottish provincial silver teaspoons from Perth in the Fiddle and Shell pattern, circa 1830. Five spoons are by James Stobie, the remaining 3 by John Pringle, both worked in Perth at the same time. All are single struck, as is usual for Scottish flatware, and all are engraved with original owners initials JIJ. The shell pattern struck by the 2 different makers is slightly different, so these were struck in different workshops using different moulds (the Stobie shell is flatter and convex, the Pringle shell is more raised and concave). The differences are quite small, not really visible unless closely scrutinised. The Pringle bowls also have slightly narrower bowls and the engraving is not quite as crisp. They also seem to have aged slightly better than the Stobie spoons, so perhaps fractionally better quality? All 8 spoons have clear hallmarks, S, JS, double headed eagle (Perth town mark), JS for the Stobie spoons, and I.P, I.P, double headed eagle, I.P for the Pringle spoons. Both of these ar...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johann Voigt
Johann Voigt (Possibly), Cape C 1791
$ 350.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork, in the Old English pattern with feather edge decoration and 3 tines, dating it around 1790 to 1800. The fork is struck with a makers mark only, i:V:G in an unusual shaped punch, which moulds around the dotted i. This fork matches S 1787, the main difference being longer tines (we believe original, these have not been shortened) and a makers mark that is good but not as clearly struck as the other. Welz describes this maker as unknown, but Heller (History of Cape Silver Vol I, pg 163) lists this maker as Johann Voigt? Both authors depict a different IVG punch from this one, with an additional fish hallmark (see our tablespoon S 1571 by the same maker to see the different punch and fish hallmark). Overall we agree with Welz and are not convinced by the attribution to Voigt, it seems far more likely to belong to a "van G" maker (for example van Graan, a known Cape name). Overall an interesting hallmark that requires further research. Note - a matching konfyt fork by the same maker is a...

Bateman Silver Port Wine Label - Crescent, Armorial
Peter, Ann Bateman, London 1794
$ 290.00

A Bateman silver Crescent shaped Port wine label, with armorial above engraved "PORT". The label has a double reeded edge, and 2 eyelets for connection to original chain. The label is quite small and dainty, and an elegant shape. The hallmarks are clear (duty mark, sterling lion and date letter t for 1794) but the makers mark is only partially struck on the edge of the label (very clear PB, and only tip of AB underneath visible). The Bateman family of silversmiths were the leading exponents of the crescent shaped wine label (Wine Labels 1730-2003, pg 62).

Canadian Silver Tablespoons (Pair) - James Melick, Saint John, New Brunswick
James Godfrey Melick, St. John, New Brunswick 1802-1885
$ 390.00

A Canadian Coin silver tablespoon pair in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved initial H. The spoons have excellent hallmarks, comprising of makers mark IM, NB for New Brunswick, and pseudo hallmarks lion passant, anchor and Georgian duty mark bust (this last one sideways). James Melick was a working silversmith and clockmaker, he worked from premises in Prince William Street, Dock Street and Market Square over his career (Canadian Silversmiths, John Langdon, pg 101). Canadian Maritime silversmiths of the early 19th century favoured imitation hallmarks, dictated by competition from imported English silver. St John silversmiths adopted the NB hallmark for New Brunswick, following their colleagues in Halifax (Langdon, pg 22).

Dutch Silver Hanoverian Tablespoons (Set of 4) Andries Vis
Andries Vis, Amsterdam 1754
$ 520.00

A set of four Early Georgian Dutch silver Hanoverian pattern tablespoons, made in Amsterdam in 1754 by Andries Vis. The four tablespoons (also called porridge spoons by the Dutch) have a central rib, and a very strong upturn, enough so it can hang from a finger. The spoons also have a double drop, with a prominent pip at the end of the second drop. The hallmarks are good on all 4 spoons, and include makers mark of a fish for Andries Vis, rampant lion with crown indicating first standard silver (925 sterling quality), town mark for Amsterdam (three crosses under crown) and date letter U for 1754. Andries Vis worked between 1741 and his death in 1799, he is known for his cast figural spoons. He was a very competent silversmith, in addition to spoons he produced teapots and other hollow-ware. His silver is well represented in museum collections, a very similar spoon to these is in the Boijmans museum.

Dutch Silver Hanoverian Tablespoon - Nijmegen, Hendricus Wolterbeek - Excellent Hallmarks
Hendricus J. Wolterbeek, Nijmegen 1770
$ 260.00

A rare Dutch silver Hanoverian tablespoon (porridge spoon) made by Hendricus Johannes Wolterbeek in Nijmegen in 1770. The spoon has the usual central Hanoverian rib with strong turn-up, and a very wide circular drop, and a larger bowl than is usually seen. The spoon has an original engraved family crest of a well engraved crown above a stylised X, with flowing scrolls, this is on the back of the spoon, when spoons were displayed bowl down. The spoon's main delight are it's well struck and very clear hallmarks, including makers mark of crowned tree in irregular shaped punch for Hendricus Wolterbeek (1730-1805, he worked between 1755 and 1788). The second mark is a crowned double headed eagle city mark for Nijmegen, the third is a intricately crowned N 1st Standard (Grote keur, sterling 925 standard) mark for Nijmegen, the last mark is a crowned O date letter for 1770.

Scottish Provincial Dessert Spoon - Charles Torchetti, Aberdeen
Charles Torchetti, Aberdeen 1825-1840
$ 490.00

A Scottish Provincial silver Fiddle pattern dessert spoon, by a very rare maker, with excellent hallmarks. The spoon is engraved with initial F in contemporary style, a single initial as is often the case in Scotland. The hallmarks are excellent, well struck and very clear, and include makers mark CT, Gothic A, incuse Fleur De Lys, Gothic A, makers mark CT, for Charles Torchetti, who worked in Aberdeen from 1825 until his death in 1840. In the book "Aberdeen Silver" by Michael Wilson, he is described as a "rare maker, with occasional Fiddle pattern spoons and forks". He was described as a picture framer, optician and looking glass maker in the Aberdeen Trade Directory (Wilson pg 34), he worked from Queens Street. Wilson also notes that Alexander Grant used the same Gothic A and incuse Flear De Lys, and that they came from the same punch, so surmises that Torchetti bought spoons from Grant and applied his own makers mark. The provenance of this spoon is also interesting, it has spent the last 40 years as part...

Cape Silver Dessert Spoons (Mixed set of 6) - Twentyman, Moore, Townsend, Daniel
John Townsend (1), Peter Clarke Daniel (1) Lawrence Twentyman (2), William Moore (2), Cape C 1820-1850
$ 800.00

A mixed set of 6 Cape silver dessert spoons, all in the Fiddle pattern. 2 spoons have original owners engraved initials (HR and WFS), one has the very faint remains of a family crest and engraved initial B, and 3 have no initials or crests. All 6 spoons have very clear Cape silver hallmarks, with no wear, showing quite a lot of different pseudo hallmarks used by Cape silversmiths, so an interesting collection. The first spoon is by Peter Clarke Daniel (PD, pseudo duty, pseudo date letter B, mark 42 in Welz), Daniel was born in Dublin but arrived in South Africa with the 1820 settlers as a child. The second is by John Townsend (JT, pseudo duty mark, date letter a, lion passant and duty mark, mark 123 in Welz). The next 2 are by William Moore (WM, Cape stub mark, Welz mark 100, one spoon also has an incuse D mark, either a journeyman or owners mark). The last 2 are by Lawrence Twentyman but with different hallmarks and made at different times (the Fiddle pattern noticeably different on these 2 spoons). The firs...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johann Voigt
Johann Voigt (Possibly), Cape C 1791
$ 390.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork, in the Old English pattern with feather edge decoration and 3 tines, dating it around 1790 to 1800. The fork is struck with a makers mark only, i:V:G in an unusual shaped punch, which moulds around the dotted i. This mark is well struck, and is clearly different from the I:VG mark depicted in Cape Silver by Welz (mark 170, pg 158), the key differences being the shaped punch above i and the second : between the V and G. Welz describes this maker as unknown, but Heller (History of Cape Silver Vol I, pg 163) lists this maker as Johann Voigt? Both authors depict a different IVG punch from this one, with an additional fish hallmark (see our tablespoon S 1571 by the same maker to see the different punch and fish hallmark). Overall we agree with Welz and are not convinced by the attribution to Voigt, it seems far more likely to belong to a "van G" maker (for example van Graan, a known Cape name). Overall an interesting hallmark that requires further research. Note - a matching konfyt fork ...

Georgian Silver Snuff Box - Finlayson Family
John Douglas, London 1804
$ 490.00

An interesting Georgian silver snuffbox, with Finlayson family interest. The snuff box has an engraved cross hatch design, with 2 intersecting straps, copying an early suitcase or trunk. The snuff box is curved, so would fit snugly in a pocket. The interior is gilded. The straps are very suitable for engraving, and the names of 4 different generations of Finlaysons have been engraved on this one. The 4 names include "John Finlayson Merchant, Canongate 1760, John Finlayson S.S.C. Edinburgh 1824, Thomas B. Finlayson 1862, Mary H. Finlayson 1874". The base is also engraved with owners initials AF 1833, we assume another Finlayson. The script engraving of all 4 names is different, so was engraved at different times as ownership of the box transferred. The first date precedes the age of the box, so we assume the 2nd Finlayson started the tradition. The hallmarks are clear, and include makers mark ID without pellet (Grimwade 1250), this could be John Douglas or John Death, we assume Douglas as he was a known snuf...

Cape Silver Teaspoons (Set of 6) - Daniel Beets
Daniel Beets, Cape 1812-1828
$ 780.00

A set of six Cape silver teaspoons in the Fiddle pattern, by Daniel Beets. All 6 spoons have original owners engraved initials JMB. All 6 teaspoons are clearly hallmarked in the same way, with makers mark DB struck twice, alternating with a pseudo Lion passant standard mark, also struck twice. This is a rare combination of marks, not recorded in Cape Silver by Welz, where he shows Beets with star and circular devices, but not with the lion passant punch. Heller shows a Beets mark interspersed with pseudo kings head duty marks, also not shown in Welz, which shows Beets dis also occasionally use pseudo punches. Daniel Beets worked between 1812 and 1828, he was the illegitimate son of German Balthus Beets and Cape slave Angana. His son, also Daniel Beets, also practised as a silversmith, but as he probaly used his fathers punches, no marks are recorded for him. We postulate these could possibly be Daniel Beets Junior, sharing pseudo punches with fellow silversmiths, a practice that is known to have happened.

Irish Silver Hanoverian Tablespoon - Alexander Richards
Alexander Richards, Dublin 1764
$ 450.00

An interesting early Georgian Irish Hanoverian tablespoon, made by Alexander Richards in Dublin 1764. The spoon has a frontal rib, strong turn-up and a very narrow oval bowl. It is engraved with a Griffin crest on the back of the spoon, showing this spoon was placed on the table bowl down. The spoon is bottom marked, the date letter is very clear, but the makers mark , crowned harp and Hibernia are are worn, but still discernable. Alexander Richards, a noted Irish spoonmaker, worked between 1724 and 1768 (Bennett, Irish Silver, pg 152).

Dutch Silver Hanoverian Tablespoon or Porridge Spoon - Utrecht, Sebastiaan de Mare
Sebastiaan Gijsbert de Mare, Utrecht 1805
$ 260.00

A Dutch silver Hanoverian pattern tablespoon (or porridge spoon as referred to by the Dutch) made in Utrecht in 1805 by Sebastiaan de Mare. The spoon has the traditional Hanoverian central rib with turn up end, and a wide drop. The spoon has the original owners initials BI engraved on the back of the spoon, dating back to when spoons were placed on the table bowl down (with initials displayed). The spoon has 5 clear hallmarks, including an excellent makers mark of a laying deer for Sebastiaan Gijsbert de Mare, this mark is a lovely makers mark and exceptionally well struck and clear. The spoon also has the Utrecht city coat of arms mark struck twice, indicating first standard ( Grote Keur), or 925 sterling standard. The date letter is slighty obscured, we believe X for 1805 but could also be K for 1793. The final mark is the Dutch Crowned O second assay mark, quite rare as only used between 1807 and 1810, used as a re-examination mark of earlier silver when resold, or for imported articles without payment of ...

Chinese Export Silver Butter Knife
WE WE WC, Canton, China C 1815-1880
$ 390.00

A Chinese Export silver butter knife in the Fiddle pattern, with Stags head crest and original owners initials TMK. The knife is good quality, easily comparable to an English Georgian example. The hallmarks are excellent, and include pseudo duty mark, pseudo crowned leopards head (London town mark pre 1821), pseudo date letter P in incuse rectangle with cut corners, pseudo lion passant and makers mark WE WE WC. This is an imitation of the makers mark for William Eley, William Fearn and William Chawner. The Chinese Export silver collectors guide (4th edition, pg 763-767) says this maker remains unidentified, but was responsible "for an astounding production of silver items, almost all in the European neo-classical style. The work of WE WE WC is par excellence, it can rival the best of English, European and American silversmiths of the Georgian era. There is no such thing as a poor piece of WE WE WC silver. To have the wherewithal to create silver that rivaled the finest European and American silversmiths of th...

Georgian Silver Gaming Vinaigrette
John Caney, London 1802
$ 1 250.00

A rare and interesting silver gaming vinaigrette, with a rotating disk with mounted gold arrow that points at a dial with numbers from 1 to 10. The vinaigrette is circular, with 5 sections between each numeral, the rotating disk is engraved with a radiating pattern, which adds grip to allow the disk to be rotated to the desired number. The base of the vinaigrette has an attractive engraved floral arrangement, the sides are decorated with further engraving and prick work bands. The interior grille is plain, but with a pattern of punched holes, as is common on earlier vinaigrettes. The interior is gilded, the base lemon yellow, the lid and grille a slightly darker gold colour, so possibly re-gilded. The hallmarks are clear, on both the base and the lid, the grille has no hallmarks. The hallmarks include makers mark IC in rectangular punch without dot, we have tentatively ascribed to John Caney (Grimwade 1218), as his mark has no dot and he was a small worker of the period (registered 1800). Unfortunately the ...

Cape Silver Teaspoons (6) - Lotter Family
Cape C 1815
$ 700.00

A mixed and interesting set of 6 Cape silver Old English pattern teaspoons, all made by members of the Lotter family of Cape silversmiths. It consists of 3 matched spoons by Gerhardus Lotter, 2 spoons by his cousin Carel David Lotter, and 1 spoon by his brother Willem Godfried Lotter. The 3 spoons by Gerhardus are marked by makers mark GL (Welz mark 68), one spoon by Carel has makers mark CDL (Welz mark 63), the other Carel spoon has CDL between 2 stars (Welz mark 64). The Willem spoon has WGL between 2 L shaped devices (Welz mark 94), all marks are clear. One Carel spoon has original engraved initials DJLR, the other 5 have no engraving. The spoons have very slight differences in style and length, but they are close enough to be used as a set.

Cape Silver Konfyt Forks (Two) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 540.00

Two Cape silver four prong Old English pattern konfyt (preserve) forks, by Johannes Combrink. The forks are similar but have slight differences when viewed together, so probably made at different times. The longer fork has a wider stem end, but shorter tines, and is 1 gramme heavier. Both are hallmarked with a single makers mark IC (Welz mark 32, pg 147), both are clear and well struck.

Antique York Silver Tableforks (set of 12) - Hampston & Prince
Hampston & Prince, York 1789-1794
$ 1 450.00

An interesting and rare set of 11 York Georgian silver Old English pattern tableforks, by the York makers Hampston & Prince, with a matching London tablefork. All 12 forks have the same engraved monogram HWT which is original. The forks consist of 4 dated 1789 (date letter C), 4 dated 1793 (date letter g), 3 dated 1794 (date letter h), and the London example dated 1809 by Robert Rutland, a spoonmaker. The forks have lovely balance and shape, very elegant, with long tines and a strong turn-ups at the end of the forks. The London fork matches well but has shorter tines, possibly from wear, what is interesting is that the 11 York forks are noticeably better quality (and weight) than the London example, which has an old repair on one tine (this goes against conventional wisdom that London made flatware is better quality than provincial - we feel this proves the opposite). The hallmarks are excellent, and demonstrate that many different punches were in operation at the York office at the same time, and that stand...

Two Georgian Silver Miniature Vinaigrettes - Joseph Willmore
Joseph Willmore, Birmingham 1813 and 1821
$ 980.00

Two Georgian silver vinaigrettes, both very small in size, and both by Joseph Willmore. They are very attractive and dainty, less than half the size of most vinaigrettes, we love these boxes. The first (1813) is lozenge shaped, the concave base fits beautifully around the thumb, it is a delight to hold. The cover is engraved with flowers and prick work surrounding initials THC, the base has a different floral engraving. The grille is plain, the interior gilding and hallmarks are excellent. including JW makers mark in circular serrated punch, his first mark used between 1797 and 1834. The second (1821) is rectangular with canted corners, the cover engraved with an attractive wavy pattern around a vacant cartouche, the base with an engraved flower. The grille is also plain, the hallmarks are good, on both lid, base and grille. The corners have some oxidation, but it does not detract. Joseph Willmore, who worked between 1797 and 1843, is described by Eric Delieb as "a superlative silversmith, who produced some o...

Rare Georgian Silver Spring Hinged Sugar Tongs - Innes Family Crest
John Baker II, London C 1770-1780
$ 470.00

A rare set of spring hinged Georgian silver sugar tongs, in perfect condition, which is quite unusual for these type of tongs. The tongs have a hinge with steel spring built into it, the steel is visible on the rear.The arms are cast, and have a bead and thread edge, the grips have an attractive pattern. The hinge bears the Innes family crest, of a lion holding a palm frond, under the motto "Ornatur Radix Fronde", translated "The root is adorned by the foliage". As is usual for Scottish crests, the motto is above (English crests the motto is below), the Innes family comes from the Moray area of Speyside (so perhaps these tongs should be used for adding ice to whisky rather than sugar to tea!). Both arms are hallmarked with makers mark IB and lion passant, which indicates they were made before 1784 when the duty mark was added. These type of tongs were made between 1765 and 1780 (Georgian Silver Sugar Tongs, Graham Hodges, pg 10, a book we highly recommend), and are rare in undamaged form. John Baker II worked...

Rare Scottish Provincial Tablespoons (Set of 8) - Alexander Thompson, Aberdeen
Alexander Thompson, Aberdeen 1770-1779
$ 1 250.00

A rare set of early Scottish Provincial tablespoons from Aberdeen, in the Old English pattern. The spoons all have engraved initial "P", which is contemporary. The spoons are early, and have a double drop. The spoons have pleasing dimensions, and are a good weight. The hallmarks include makers mark "AT" in script for Alexander Thompson, who worked between 1770 and 1779 in Aberdeen. The second mark is "ABD.n" in script, for Aberdeen (see Jackson pg 584). All 8 spoons are hallmarked, but some hallmarks have been slightly compressed during shaping of the spoons, and some are lightly struck or worn. Alexander Thompson was apprenticed to Coline Allan (one of Aberdeen's finest silversmiths), he was free in 1770, but unfortunately died young in 1779. He made very high quality spoons (Michael Wilson, Aberdeen Silver, A Collectors Guide, pg 32, which is a book we highly recommend).

Antique Silver Chamber Candlestick - Wakelin & Taylor
Wakelin & Taylor, London 1784
$ 940.00

A delightful antique silver chamber candlestick, used for lighting one to bed. The chamberstick has a circular drip tray, and an attractive handle with reeded decoration. It has an original conical snuffer, which slots into the sconce, and removable nozzle, which made it easier to clean melted wax. Both the chamberstick and snuffer have a matching family crest of a stags head. The chamber candlestick was made by the important makers Wakelin & Taylor, Royal Goldsmiths who made a great deal of silver for the Prince of Wales, they also produced for the King. The snuffer and removable nozzle were made in 1799 ad 1801 by Joseph Taconet and William Stroud respectively, it was not unusual for the smaller items to be made by other makers. Given the matching crest on snuffer and chamberstick, we believe these to be original. The hallmarks are clear on all 3 pieces. The Wakelin and Taylor makers mark, complete with Fleur de Lys (Grimwade 1764) is excellent, this piece also has the rare incuse duty mark, only used in 17...

Swedish (or French) Antique Silver Wine Label - Curacao
Hans Lyberg?, Borus, Sweden or French? C 1804-1892
$ 220.00

An interesting antique silver wine label, marked "Curacao". The label is triangular in shape, with wavy top, and a zig-zag engraved border. 'Curacao" is hand engraved, indicating the label's age, it adds considerable charm to the label. Curacao is a bitter orange flavoured liqueur from the Caribbean island of Curacao, still produced today (Grand Marnier is an example). It was popular in the 19th century, Curacao silver wine labels have been recorded between 1804 and 1892 (Wine Labels, 1730 - 2003, John Salter). The label is unmarked, but we believe it to be Swedish, or possibly French, due to its shape and style. A series of 4 very similar Swedish labels, by Hans Lyberg of Borus (1806 - 1848), is depicted in the book "Wine Labels, 1730-2003, John Salter, pg 370-371, number 1411-1413 ad 1426. Swedish labels were generally unmarked before 1900. 3 Similar French labels, pg 354 (1347-1349) are also shown in the book above, but our preference is Swedish origin (comments welcome, thanks). The Wine label book we des...

Rare Early Georgian Silver Teapot - Richard Zouch
Richard Zouch, London 1737
$ 4 650.00

An extremely rare early Georgian silver teapot, made in 1737 by Richard Zouch, who was clearly a master craftsman. The teapot is fluted, made with 64 individual strips of silver, which gives the teapot a very attractive look and feel. The 64 strips alternate between rounded and flat, giving the teapot a lovely look and feel. The teapot is quite small, as is usual for this period, when tea was still an expensive commodity. The spout is straight, as is usual for teapots between 1725 and 1740, when they became curved. The finial is an ivory disk, the lid has the same fluted pattern as the body, but is made from a single piece of silver. The handle is turned fruitwood, C shaped with a thumb piece for easy pouring. The teapot has a circular raised foot, which has protected the hallmarks, which are excellent. The makers mark RZ under acorn is very clear (Grimwade 2464), which was used by Zouch between 1734 and 1739. The lid is unmarked. Richard Zouch was freed in 1737, he worked from Chequer Court in Charing Cross...

Scottish Provincial Silver Sugar Tongs - David Gray, Dumfries
David Gray, Dumfries 1810-1841
$ 310.00

A very pleasing pair of Scottish Provincial silver sugar tongs, by David Gray of Dumfries. The tongs are plain but have lovely proportions, which are noticeably different from English made tongs. The hallmarks are excellent, unicorn, makers mark DG, and fouled anchor. This combination of marks is unusual and is not recorded by either Jackson (pg 597) or by Turner (Directory of Scottish Provincial Silversmiths). The tongs are engraved with script initials EB, which is original.

Cape Silver Basting Spoon - Willem Lotter
Willem Godfried Lotter, Cape 1810-1835
$ 780.00

A Cape silver basting (or serving) spoon in the Fiddle pattern, by Willem Godfried Lotter, one of the members of the famous Lotter family of Cape silversmiths. The spoon is engraved with initials CIT in fancy script, this is original. This is a good solid spoon, very suitable for use, the bowl is a good gauge and the tip is excellent. The hallmarks are clear, and consist of makers mark WGL between 2 diamond devices (actually square with a cross in the middle), mark 89 in Cape Silver by Stephan Welz. Willem Lotter worked between 1810 and 1835, his work is represented in the Paarl musuem. David Heller (History of Cape Silver) regarded Lotter as one of the top Cape silversmiths.

Scottish Provincial Silver Teaspoons (Set of 4) - James Douglas, Dundee
James Douglas, Dundee 1796-1820
$ 390.00

A set of 4 Scottish Provincial silver teaspoons in the Celtic pointed pattern, by James Douglas of Dundee. The spoons have original script initials BS. The hallmarks include makers mark ID for James Douglas, followed by a crowned shield and topped heart, used by Douglas (Turner, Directory of Scottish Provincial Silver, pg 62). The hallmarks are clear, especially the topped heart mark, which is in an unusually shaped punch, almost heart shaped. James Douglas worked in Dundee between 1796 and 1820.

Georgian Scottish Silver Basting and Tablespoon - Kings Pattern
Alexander Wotherspoon, Edinburgh 1830 and 1834
$ 340.00

A Georgian Scottish silver Kings pattern basting spoon, with matching tablespoon. Both spoons are single struck, as is usual with Scottish flatware, and are engraved with initials H in fancy script, on the back of the spoons. These are lovely, substantial spoons, very suitable for use as serving spoons. The basting spoon is by Alexander Wotherspoon (1834), the tablespoon is by unknown maker WS, 1830. Both have excellent hallmarks.

Rare Cape Silver Tablespoons (Set of 4) - Johannes Heegers
Johannes Jacobus Heegers, Cape 1814-1830
$ 880.00

A rare and lovely set of Fiddle pattern Cape silver tablespoons, by a rare maker whose work is seldom seen. The spoons are very good quality and weight, and are well preserved, these are substantial spoons. The drop is an unusual shape, has a colonial flavour. The hallmarks are excellent on all 4 spoons, makers mark JH in script and a device that looks like a bishops hat (mark 50 in Welz, Cape Silver). Heegers was born in the Cape in 1778, and worked between 1814 and 1830. In 1814-1816 he was recorded as a silversmith at 6 Roze street, and in 1829-1830 he was recorded as a silversmith in Graaff-Reinet, working with his brother Theodorus. A covered sugar bowl by Johannes Heegers is in the National Cultural History museum, depicted on pg 101 of Cape Silver by Welz.

Royal Silver Belt Buckle - House of Bourbon, Order of the Golden Fleece
unmarked, Continental 18th Century
$ 780.00

A pair of Royal silver belt buckles, bearing the coat of arms of the House of Bourbon, which produced Kings and Queens for both France and Spain for hundreds of years. The central shield contains 3 Fleur-De-Lys, this was established by King Charles VI of France (who died in 1422) in honour of the Holy Trinity. The shield is topped by the Royal crown, and is surrounded by scrolls. The shield also has a "Golden Fleece" suspended from it, indicating membership of the Order of the Golden Fleece, which was established in 1430 by the Duke of Burgundy. The order still exists today, most European Royalty, including Queen Elizabeth II of Britain and King Juan Carlos of Spain are members. The buckles are stamped, and both have a silver bar for attachment to a belt. The bars are both hallmarked with 2 hallmarks. The first is a cross pattee (Maltese Cross) in circular punch, which has arms that are narrow at the centre and broader at the perimeter. This cross was used by the Knights Templar during the Crusades. The cross...

Georgian Heart Shaped Silver Caddy Spoon - Matthew Linwood
Matthew Linwood, Birmingham 1811
$ 180.00

A delightful Georgian silver caddy spoon, heart shaped with a deep bowl, with a bifurcated stem, thread pattern and coffin end. The bifurcated stem is quire a fragile design, hence the old repair where the handle has been rejoined to the bowl. The spoon has very clear hallmarks in the bowl, as well as an additional makers mark on the handle. Matthew Linwood was a highly regarded silversmith described by Delieb as "produced some of the finest of all the Birmingham boxes" in his book "Silver Boxes". He is also well known for his caddy spoons. A very similar caddy spoon was part of the John Norie collection, depicted as lot 187 (Part 1, Woolley & Wallis, 2004). This particular spoon was made by Josiah Snatt in London 1801.

Antique Silver Vinaigrette
Ledsam & Vale, Birmingham 1821
$ 270.00

A delightful silver vinaigrette, one of the smaller ones we have seen. The vinaigrette is decorated with an attractive, irregular pattern, and has a vacant cartouche. The grill is plain, with a light yellow gilding, the interior of the box has a lovely reddy gold gilding. The hallmarks are clear, and include Georgian duty mark, makers mark L&Co (Jackson pg 355), sterling lion, anchor town mark for Birmingham, and date letter X for 1821.The grill is also hallmarked with a lion, before the holes were stamped. The vinaigrette was an essential fashion accessory at the beginning of the 19th century, it contained scented vinegar on a sponge, used "to restore the sickly back to vigorous health" (Helliwell, Collecting small silverware, pg 148). Ledsam and Vale (1818-1826) are highly regarded makers, they were joined by Wheeler in 1826.

Georgian Silver Child's Porringer
William Skeen, London 1770
$ 560.00

A lovely antique silver child's porringer, in traditional Queen Anne style, although it was made in Georgian times. The porringer has a central cartouche with script initials MB, which are Victorian in style so would have been added by a later owner. The porringer is decorated with curved lobes and flutes, and the cartouche is surrounded by foliage. The porringer also has punched floral decoration, and the S shaped handles are banded. The gauge is quite thin, more suited for display than for use. The base of the porringer is engraved "RB over IG, 1769", in contemporary engraving, indicating the porringer could have originally been a wedding present, or a christening present for a child born the following year. Porringers of the small (child's size) size are quite rare, few have survived. The hallmarks are very clear, and although the makers mark punch has some wear, it is still legible.

Cape Silver Tablespoons (2) - Collinet
Daniel Collinet, Cape 1810-1825
$ 300.00

A set of 2 Cape silver Fiddle pattern tablespoons, by a lesser known Cape silversmith whose work does not appear very often. The spoons are a slightly different length (being handmade) and have similar but different hallmarks, so they were probably made at different times. Both have makers mark DC in between two floral or star devices, but both the makers mark and devices have differences, indicating they were struck by different punches. One DC makers mark has separate DC, the other DC appears to be cojoined. The floral or star device was used by a number of Cape silversmiths, including Beets, Hockly, Lotter, Townsend, Twentyman and Vos. The makers mark DC between 2 stars is depicted in Heller's Cape Silver Vol 2 (pg 122), where it is shown as mark NMM15.

Cape silver Tablespoons (set of 6) - Waldek
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1830
$ 680.00

A set of 6 Cape Silver tablespoons in the Fiddle pattern, with initials CIH over WAM. The initials CIH are older, the have more wear than the WAM initials, which would have been added later after a change of ownership of the spoons. All 6 spoons have excellent hallmarks, makers mark FW with the "Cape Stub" pseudo English hallmarks (see article on the Cape Stub in our articles section).

Provincial Silver Gravy Spoon - Bristol, Exeter Hallmarks
William Woodman (Bristol), Exeter 1825
$ 230.00

Basting spoon that was made in Bristol but hallmarked in Exeter. The spoon is a good weight, and has no wear in the bowl. The hallmarks are extremely clear, even including the workman's tallymark. A lovely spoon, ideal for use as a serving spoon. William Woodman of Bristol were one of England's largest flatware producers in their day.

Cape Silver Dessert Spoons (set of 4) - Twentyman
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1820
$ 500.00

A set of 4 Cape Silver dessert spoons in the Fiddle pattern, with initials ACI clearly engraved on each spoon. The spoons have pseudo English hallmarks (duty mark, castle and date letter C), this is mark 139 from Welz (Cape Silver). No makers mark is present, but we can be confident the maker is Lawrence Twentyman, as he was the only Cape silversmith to use these particular hallmarks. The hallmarks are clear on all 4 spoons.

Cape Silver Tableforks (set of 5) - Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1830
$ 620.00

A set of five Cape silver tableforks in the Fiddle pattern, by the well regarded Cape silversmith Johannes Combrink. This set matches the 6 forks (item S 1480), and has the same engraved initials "FtW", and is by the same maker. The hallmarks are excellent on all 5 forks, makers mark IC and the Cape Stub mark (4 pseudo English marks struck together). This is mark 39 in Cape Silver by Welz, and includes lion passant, date letter A, duty mark and leopards head.

Georgian Silver Vinaigrette
John Bettridge, Birmingham 1837
$ 280.00

An attractive and dainty Georgian silver vinaigrette of very small dimensions, definitely made for a lady. It is engraved with a Scottish thistle on the base, and has a plain but decorative grill. The lid has a tiny cartouche surrounded by leaves in an oval design, the engraving is pretty but a bit chunky. The gilded grill has an unusual pierced pattern, done by hand, and the original sponge is still present. The hallmarks are very clear on both the lid and base, the grill is also hallmarked. Poole (Identifying Antique British Silver) identifies Bettridge working between 1817 and 1834, as this box is 1837 those dates must be considered erroneous. Bettridge is known for his fine quality silver boxes.

Cape Silver Tableforks (set of 6) - Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820
$ 740.00

A set of Cape silver tableforks in the Fiddle pattern, by the well known Cape silversmith Johannes Combrink. The forks are engraved with the initials "FtW", which is attractively engraved. The forks are good quality and a pleasing weight, they are suitable for use. The hallmarks on all 6 forks are clear. Four forks have makers mark IC only (Welz mark 31 in Cape Silver), two have makers mark IC between 2 ladder devices (Welz mark 33). Johannes Combrink was born in the Cape in 1781, he married Aurelia Lotter in 1807 and died in 1853. He worked from Dorp Street.

Scottish Provincial Silver Toddy Ladles (3) - Dundee - William Constable
William Constable, Dundee with Edinburgh hallmarks 1830
$ 470.00

A pair of Fiddle pattern toddy ladles, along with an Old English example, but all made by the same maker in the same year. Given Edinburgh hallmarks, the maker WC could be confused with William Cunningham of Edinburgh, but his makers mark is always in a shaped cartouche. The hallmarks on on all 3 are very clear. Note the switching of the order of the duty mark on the pair.

Scottish Provincial Teaspoon - Dumfries
Mark Hinchliffe, Dumfries C 1821-1841
$ 170.00

A rare Scottish provincial teaspoon from Dumfries, in the Old English pattern. The hallmarks include a fowled anchor, X, crown and MH (small) makers mark. The hallmarks have some wear but are still clearly visible, makers mark is very clear.

Scottish Provincial Silver Teaspoon Set (6) - Dundee - William Constable
William Constable, Dundee 1810 - 1825
$ 620.00

A rare set of 6 Scottish Provincial teaspoons, with engraved initial J. They are an unusual pattern, Fiddle without shoulders, and the edges are bevelled. Each spoon is slightly different, clearly each spoon has been made individually by hand. Each spoon is hallmarked with 3 "pot of lilies" followed by makers mark WC. The marks on 3 spoons are excellent, well struck and very clear, on 2 the bottom right hand corner is not visible, and on 1 spoon the marks are partially visible (but the pot of lilies still clearly visible) - as is often found with makers individually struck by hand. The pot of lilies townmark (azure a pot of growing lilies argent) is taken from the arms of the Burgh of Dundee (Jackson pg 598). Each pot has 3 lilies and 2 handles clearly visible.

Georgian Scottish Silver Toddy Ladle
William Forrest & Co, Edinburgh 1829
$ 170.00

A Scottish silver toddy ladle in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved initial W. We originally ascribed the WF&Co mark to William Fillan & Co. of Aberdeen, Fillan worked between 1829 and 1849 (thanks to Robert Massart who supplied this information). We have now been informed this is the mark of William Forrest and Co. of Edinburgh, who worked between 1829 and 1874 (see www.incorporationofgoldsmiths.co.uk). Our new source is currently writing a book on Aberdeen silversmiths, and believes that William Fillan only used WF along with ABD for Aberdeen. The hallmarks are clear. This mark is not included in Jacksons.

Coin Silver Tablespoon - Philadelphia
Samuel Alexander, Philadelphia C 1797
$ 160.00

American coin silver tablespoon in the Old English pattern, with "long drop" usually associated with earlier Hanoverian pattern spoons. The tablespoon has the initials RB crudely engraved with an interesting device between them, quite attractive overall, has a Colonial feel. "Coin silver" refers to silver produced from coins, which applies to all American silver prior to 1865, when silversmiths started using the higher grade "Sterling" standard. Samuel Alexander worked at South Second Street between 1797 and 1808 (Ensko, American Silversmiths), first alone, then in partnership with Christian Wiltberger (Wiltberger & Alexander). The spoon has a"colonial" feel, the quality not quite what you would expect from English spoons of the period.

Scottish Provincial Silver Dessert Spoon - Perth
John Urquhart, Perth C 1820
$ 220.00

A Scottish provincial Fiddle pattern dessert spoon, made by John Urquhart of Perth. The spoon has script initials L. Whilst the spoon bowl is disappointing, the hallmarks are very well struck and very clear. The Perth town mark (imperial double headed eagle displayed) is taken from the arms of the Burgh (Jackson, pg 613). The hallmarks include makers mark JU, double headed eagle, JU, double headed eagle, S (in an unusual shoreform shaped punch - Poole), having a noticeable indent away from base. These marks are fairly rare, indeed the makers mark and S are not included in Jackson (pg 614). Perth is the former capital of Scotland.

Scottish Provincial Silver Toddy Ladle - Dundee
Alexander Cameron, Dundee C 1830
$ 310.00

A Scottish provincial antique silver toddy ladle, Fiddle pattern with engraved initial L, and long elegant handle (longer than most toddy ladles). The hallmarks are very clear, AC, C, thistle, pot of lilies, AC. Alexander Cameron added the thistle mark to the Dundee pot of lilies in the early 19th century, after the manner of Edinburgh marks (Jackson, pg 599).

Scottish Provincial Silver Toddy Ladle - Dumfries
David Gray, Dumfries with Edinburgh marks 1818
$ 200.00

A Scottish provincial toddy ladle, made by David Gray of Dumfries, but with Edinburgh hallmarks for 1818. The ladle is Fiddle pattern, and has a beautiful crest of a crowned swan, standing with wings outstretched, with motto "Be Mindful". The hallmarks are very clear, including triple cusp duty mark. The D of the makers mark appears to overstrike a P, but the G is very clear. The ladle also has a small heart shaped journeyman's mark.

Antique Silver Punch Ladle - "Goose Egg"
George Greenhill Jones, London 1740
$ 780.00

An early George II silver punch ladle, with "goose egg" bowl, and twisted whalebone handle (with silver tip). The goose egg bowl is plain, but has a lovely texture as the individual hammer marks are visible all over the bowl. The join is the traditional heart shape, and the handle is securely fastened to the bowl.The early George II goose egg ladles are quite rare, having been made for only a short period (1735 - 1740). It is also unusual to find one in such good condition, the handles are often loose or damaged. The hallmarks are clear, but the date letter e and makers mark GJ are partially struck, but still discernable. The ladle has a 5th hallmark, the Dutch script letter I, which is a tax mark for silver items in the Netherlands not bearing an older tax mark. This indicates the ladle passed through the Netherlands at some stage.

Scottish Provincial Silver Toddy Ladle - Inverness, Donald Fraser
Donald Fraser, Inverness with Edinburgh hallmarks 1830
$ 230.00

A Scottish provincial silver toddy ladle, made in Inverness by Donald Fraser, but hallmarked in Edinburgh in 1830. The ladle is Fiddle pattern and is plain. The hallmarks are very clear, including a large makers mark D.F.

Georgian Silver Christening Mug
makers mark present but unidentified, London 1811
$ 400.00

A Georgian silver Christening mug, in the shape of a barrel, decorated with reeded bands. The interior is gilt, and the handle is also decorated with reeded bands. This type of Christening mug was popular between 1800 and 1820 (Waldron, Price Guide to Antique Silver, pg 190). The hallmarks are clear with the exception of the makers mark, which is only partially visible. The first letter T is clear, but the second letter is worn (could be D, P or R).

French Silver Grapefruit Spoons (pair) - Rare hallmarks
C. Mahler, Paris 1838
$ 230.00

An attractive pair of French Silver grapefruit spoons, with double shell and foliage pattern. These spoons have extremely rare and strange hallmarks. The first is the Giraffe's head Recense mark (Poincon de recense) for Paris, only used between May and October 1838, a period during which the hallmarking system was being changed. It was applied to verify authenticity of marks for the interim period. In addition, th spoons have the Paris assay office mark (medium, 1819-1838), and one spoon has the Paris silver standard 1 (950 grade), whilst the other has the Paris silver standard 2 (800 grade), which as the spoons are identical in every other respect by the same maker, must be an error by the assay master during a confused period. The spoons also have additional marks alongside the makers mark which we have not identified (see photo).

Scottish Silver Hanoverian Tablespoons (pair)
Lothian & Robertson, Edinburgh C 1760
$ 200.00

A pair of Scottish Hanoverian tablespoons, with initials "DMcD over MMcD", (possibly McDonald?) engraved on the back of the spoons. The spoons have a lovely feel and are a pleasing weight, good quality tablespoons very suitable for use. They have a central rib and a large drop. The hallmarks are poorly struck, but the makers mark L&R, Edinburgh castle and Scottish thistle are still visible on one spoon. The other spoon has a partial makers mark visible, being L&. The date letter is too indistinct to read, but the presence of the thistle dates them to post 1759, when the thistle replaced the assay masters mark on Scottish silver. Edward Lothian and Patrick Robertson worked in the late 1750's and early 1760's.

Georgian Silver Flatware Set (17 pieces)
William Chawner, London 1828, 1829, 1895
$ 1 550.00

A matching set of crested Georgian silver flatware, including 12 tablespoons, 2 sauce ladles, 2 saltspoons and butterknife, all of very good gauge and quality. The pattern is Fiddle and Thread, and all pieces have an interesting double crest, indicating a marriage between 2 noble families. The first crest is of a head and shoulders of a bearded man with unruly hair, the second a raised fist holding a halbeard. The saltspoons have gilded bowls to prevent corrosion. The butterknife is a later addition to the set (made in 1895), and only has the bearded man crest. The makers mark on the butterknife has been removed, possibly to allow the retailer to overstamp. Chawner was a prolific spoonmaker, he ran a large workshop of journeymen, whose individual marks can be seen on the spoons (devices include stars, bars, circles and triangles).

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork
W.C. - unrecorded, Cape C 1820
$ 200.00

Typically Cape konfyt (preserve) fork, in the Fiddle pattern. The hallmarks are also typically Cape (WC or WG?) in a shaped punch, between 2 crude stars. The makers mark is a little indistinct, either a worn or mistruck punch, or could even be overstruck. Given this is an unrecorded maker not listed in any of the reference books (as far as we can determine), it could have another Colonial origin.

Georgian Silver Fishslice
William Eaton, London 1836
$ 350.00

A lovely antique silver fish slice from the short reign of William IV, with a pierced and engraved fish design, with lovely detail. The slice is Fiddle pattern, and has a crest of a griffin on a crown, surrounded by buckle with the motto "Nil Virtute Praeclarus" (Never Virtue in Beauty?). The crest is very good condition, clearly visible. William Eaton, a specialist spoonmaker, worked between 1824 and 1844. The hallmarks are very clear.

Georgian Silver Salver - Agincourt Armorial - Baron John Wodehouse
Thomas Hannam & John Crouch, London 1765
$ 2 550.00

An early Georgian silver salver with wavy outline and gadrooned rim, set on 3 stepped pad feet, with an imposing coat of arms which is well engraved and very clear. The salver is a good size and weight (over 1 kilogramme), and the hallmarks are very clear.The coat of arms belongs to a peer of the realm, which is indicated by the presence of an open coronet above the armorial, and "supporters" on either side. The arms are "quartered" (4 different coat of arms, indicating several marriages to heiresses, bringing new arms to the family). The motto "Agincourt" indicates participation in the famous battle between England and France in 1415. The salver has an old worn label on the back, which records the family names of the coat of arms - Spencer, ?arnegie (Carnegie?), Fraser, Berkeley. Marks on the rear of the salver show the possibility that the crest has been let in (a later addition) which was common practice when a families' coat of arms changed through marriage (the updated coat of arms would be added to the ...

Georgian Silver Scallop Shells (set of 4)
John Pero, London 1739
$ 7 100.00

A magnificent set of 4 early Georgian cast scallop shells, with "curled" handles, the ends "rolled over" to form a double scroll grip, in the manner of Onslow pattern flatware. The use of scallop shells is the subject of some argument, they have long been called "butter shells", but have also been described as "oyster scallops", salts, sweetmeat and sauce dishes (Judith Bannister, "Scallop Shells in English Silver, Collectors Guide, June 1967"). They are in the style of Paul de Lamerie, who popularised these in the 1730's, so much so that other makers followed suit. The shells are realistically cast, roughly life size and rest on 3 dolphin feet, also cast, in keeping with the marine theme. Each shell is also engraved with a family crest, a Maltese cross over a crescent, surrounded by branches. The shells are exceptional quality, they are solid and heavy, and the detail on both shells and dolphins is good. The hallmarks are visible but given the curved shape of the shell are not well struck, and are worn. The ...

Scottish Provincial Silver Toddy Ladle - Dundee
Andrew Wilkie, Dundee with Edinburgh hallmarks 1821
$ 200.00

Typical Scottish silver toddy ladle, in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved initail P. The ladle was made by Andrew Wilkie, a Dundee silversmith, but was assayed in Edinburgh. Silver by Wilkie is found with both Dundee marks (pot of lilies) and with Edinburgh marks, as is the case with other Scottish provincial silversmiths, brought about by the imposition of duty on hallmarked silver. According to Turner (Directory of Scottish provincial silversmiths and their marks), certain makers had a proportion of their silver fully stamped in Edinburgh, to keep their registration as a silversmith valid - and to keep the Revenue service happy that duty was being paid.

Silver Hanoverian Teaspoons (mixed set of 12)
Includes Hester Bateman, Charles Hougham (5), thomas Devonshire & William Watkins, Ebernezer Coker., London C 1750-1790
$ 500.00

A unique set of 12 Hanoverian teaspoons, six of which are shellbacks, the other six are scrollbacks. These spoons predate the common practise of making and selling flatware in sets, complete sets are extremely rare. As is usual of the period, these spoons only have 2 hallmarks, the sterling and makers mark, which given the small size of the spoons were often poorly struck. The makers mark is present on all spoons but discernable on only 8, with 5 being by Charles Hougham (one set of 3 and another set of 2), and one each by Hester Bateman, Ebernezer Coker and Thomas Devonshire & William Watkins. Nine spoons have contempory initials, and 2 have a later crest.

Antique Silver Meat Skewer - Royal Goldsmiths
Wakelin & Garrard, London 1800
$ 230.00

Plain silver meat skewer with ring pull and a diamond shaped crest, indicating it once belonged to an unmarried daughter of a nobleman. Skewers were used in joints of meat to hold them together whilst carving. John Wakelin and Robert Garrard I were extremely important makers, who were appointed as Goldsmith & Jeweller to the King (George III) in 1797 (Source Grimwade, London Goldsmiths). The hallmarks are well struck and extremely clear. The makers mark appears to be overstruck. Garrard, who joined Wakelin in 1792, took over the firm on Wakelin's death in 1802 - Garrard's still exists today.

Georgian Silver Basting spoon
Thomas Wallis, London 1784
$ 200.00

Early Old English pattern (with narrow, elegant handle) basting spoon, with a long drop. The bowl is slightly smaller than later versions. The hallmarks are very clear.

Rare Cape Silver tubular handled Konfyt fork
unmarked - possibly Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820
$ 620.00

An extremely rare Cape konfyt (preserve) fork with tubular handle, with typically Cape prick engraving of foliage at the top of the handle. No hallmarks are present. The handle is similar to the Cannon handle pattern of early English flatware. Similar forks are illustrated in Heller's History of Cape Silver (Vol 2, pg 82) and Welz's Cape Silver (pg 68), these are by Johannes Combrink.

Provincial (Newcastle) Silver Tablespoons (3)
John Brown, Newcastle 1822
$ 280.00

Plain set of 3 Old English tablespoons from Newcastle, with very clear hallmarks. These spoons all have the same Initial B as the 4 tablespoons with the incuse duty mark (item S 1184).

Antique Silver Basting spoon (turkey spoon)
John Lambe, London 1798
$ 220.00

A lovely, early Old English basting spoon, with narrow elegant stem and very good gauge, in excellent condition. It is ideal for use as a serving spoon. The hallmarks are also very clear.

George I octagonal caster
Thomas Bamford, London 1723
$ 860.00

Typical early Georgian small octagonal caster by a well known maker. Thomas Bamford was a specialist caster maker, whose apprentices included Samuel Wood, who also became a prolific specialist caster maker. Bamford's address was the interestingly named Gutter Lane. The caster is clearly hallmarked, both on the base and on the sleeve of the lid.

George II Antique Silver Marrow Scoop - James Tookey
James Tookey, London 1756
$ 230.00

Early marrow scoop of good gauge, with good hallmarks - the makers mark and date letter are very clear, the sterling and town mark are slightly squashed but still legible. A lion crest is present, but worn.

Silver Basting spoons (Pair) - tulip crest
Jonathan Hayne, London 1830
$ 500.00

Pair of Old English serving spoons of good gauge, with a nice feel.They are perfect for use as heavy duty serving spoons. They have an interesting crest of a tulip in front of 2 crossed crosses, each cross arm bearing another cross. Hallmarks very clear.

Silver Snuff box (double lidded)
Thomas Phipps & Edward Robinson, London 1805
$ 330.00

Interesting double lidded snuffbox with trellis and diaper engraving and a crest, by well known silversmiths. Both the box and both lids are clearly hallmarked.

Antique Silver Caddy Spoon - Thomas James, Mayne Family Crest
Thomas James, London 1810
$ 470.00

A pleasing, heavy caddy spoon by the well known caddy spoon maker Thomas James, whose spoons often have interesting handle shapes, and a "fish-tail" projection at the base of the handle. The spoon has a beautiful crest of a hand holding a cross, with the motto "VIRTUTI FORTUNA COMIS", translated "excellence, fortune and kindness". The hallmarks are very clear. This spoon appears to be an identical twin of a spoon sold by Woolley and Wallis from the John Norie collection, Part 1, April 2004, lot 132. We have now identified the family crest as belonging to the Mayne Family of Scotland, from Tullibody & Powis in Stirling. The crest is described as "Cubit arm, erect, proper habited sable cuff argent holding a cross crosslet gules", the motto above the crest denotes a Scottish family. One possible original owner of this spoon is Colonel William Mayne, who served as Captain of the 1st Life Guards at Waterloo. Thomas James was freed in 1789, but only entered his own mark in 1804.

Nathaniel Mills silver vinaigrette
Nathaniel Mills, Birmingham 1833
$ 500.00

Gilt, engine turned vinaigrette with original sponge and very good hinge. Engraved "J Lang, 1835". Grille has flowers set amongst scrolling foliage.

Georgian Silver Wine Label - Sherry, Phipps & Robinson
Thomas Phipps & Edward Robinson, London 1798
$ 170.00

Georgian silver rectangular wine label with canted corners, engraved sherry, by the highly regarded makers Phipps and Robinson. Phipps and Robinson worked between 1784 and 1811, and were known for high quality workmanship and innovative designs, they were one of the best known London label firms (Wine Labels 1730-2003, pg 168). Hallmarks are clear, duty mark has indent. Chain appears original. Prior to 1790 rectangular labels had sharp corners, canted corners became fashionable after this date.

Georgian Silver Basting spoon
Christopher and Thomas Wilkes Barker, London 1801
$ 200.00

Plain, elegant Fiddle pattern basting spoon of good weight, perfect for use as a serving spoon. The hallmarks are very clear. These silversmiths were a father and son team.

Georgian Silver "Postage Stamp" Wine Label - P (Port)
Thomas Phipps, Edward Robinson &James Phipps, London 1814
$ 190.00

A single letter "Postage Stamp" silver wine label, which has been scratch engraved P (for Port). The label is rectangular, with a reeded edge. Given it's shape and size, these have been called "Postage Stamp" labels, they were first produced by Phipps and Robinson in the late 1790's (Wine Labels, 1730-2003, John Salter, pg 70).

Exeter Silver Tablespoons (pair)
Joseph Hicks, Exeter 1808
$ 170.00

Pair of Georgian provincial silver Exeter tablespoons in the Old English pattern, with clear hallmarks.

Antique silver Fish slice
William Ely, London 1829
$ 210.00

Plain Georgian Silver pierced fish slice in the Fiddle pattern, with a very pleasant feel. Engraved initials and clear hallmarks.

Madeira wine label   
Charles Reily & George Storer, London 1834

Oval label, pierced Madeira, moulded with scallop shells and scrolling foliage. Very clear hallmarks.

Dessertspoons (6) Fiddle pattern   
William Eley, William Fearn, William Chawner, London 1813

Matching set of 6 dessertspoons, with engraved initials WG. Very clear hallmarks.

Teaspoons (6) - Fiddle pattern   
William Fearn, London 1821

Matching set of 6 teaspoons, with engraved initials. These spoons are all 1821, the last year of the crowned leopard London hallmark. Very clear hallmarks with the exception of the makers mark, which is only visible on one spoon.

Cape shellback tablespoon - Fiddle pattern   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape 1818-1832

Unusual cape shellback tablespoon, this is the only example of a Cape shellback we have seen. Very clear English pseudo hallmarks and makers mark. Twentyman moved to India in 1832, where he continued to trade as a silversmith.

Cape dinnerforks (6) - Fiddle pattern   
Lawrence Twentyman (5), John Townsend (1), Cape C 1830

Pleasing associated set of Cape tableforks, 5 by Lawrence Twentyman, one by his contempory John Townsend. Very clear hallmarks, showing the wide variety of hallmarking styles used by the Cape silversmiths. 2 forks have the initial W on the back.

Cape konfyt (preserve) fork - Old English pattern   
Martinus Lourens Smith, Cape C 1780

Typically Cape konfyt fork. Smith was a Dane who arrived in the Cape in 1757 as a VOC employee. The hallmark is partially obscured, with only LS of the MLS visible (overstruck?), but his 2 distinctive leaves are clearly visible.

Cape tablespoon - Fiddle pattern   
Martinus Lourens Smith, Cape C 1800

Plain Cape tablespoon with very clear hallmarks, showing makers initials between two Fleur de Lys.

Cape mash spoon - Old English pattern   
Jan Lotter, Cape C 1815

Beautiful and rare Cape spoon of unusual size and shape, with engraved initials AMW. It is teaspoon size but has a long stem, leading us to believe it is a mash spoon. Mash spoons were used to stir the teapot to assist brewing. Lotter produced very fine silver, although only for 4 years (1813-1817), indicating he probably died young. Very distinct makers mark.

Cape sauce ladle - Fiddle pattern   
Daniel Beets, Cape C 1820

Cape sauce ladle with very clear hallmarks, the makers initials struck twice between 3 roses. Beets was the illegitimate son of the German Balthus Beets of Neubrandenburg and the Cape slave Angana.

Cape tablespoon -Hanoverian pattern   
Gerhardus Lotter, Cape C 1800

Early Cape tablespoon of Hanoverian pattern, with the end of the spoon turning up.

Cape tablespoons (pair) - Old English pattern   
Carel David Lotter, Cape C 1815

Beautiful pair of plain Cape tablespoons, with very clear makers mark. Both these spoons have the initial H lightly engraved on the back of the spoon shafts.

Cape dinnerfork - Fiddle pattern   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1830

Cape tablefork in good condition, with very clear pseudo English hallmarks and makers mark. Initials ADL on the back of the fork.

Silver Gilt Snuffbox - Hebe, Goddess of Youth   
John Jones III, London 1825

A magnificent silver gilt snuffbox, with a cast panel of a scene from Greek mythology, showing Hebe, Goddess of Youth, feeding Jupiter (disguised as an eagle) with Ambrosia, the nectar of eternal youth. Hebe, or Juventas in Latin, was the cup bearer to the Gods, responsible for feeding them "Heavens Wine" to provide immortality. The box is engine turned, and has a flower head thumb pull. This box is of outstanding quality, and is heavy and has a pleasing feel. Hallmarks are very clear.

Set of 24 spoons (12 tablespoons and 12 dessertspoons), Old English pattern   
Solomon Hougham, London 1803

Fabulous matching set of 24 spoons (table and dessert) with griffon crest. The tablespoons are large and heavy enough to use as serving spoons. Very clear hallmarks and crest on all 24 spoons.

Antique silver salts (pair)   
William Pitts, London 1786

Elegant, plain, oval shaped boat shaped salts with beaded rim, on an oval pedestal. Interiors are gilt. Very clear hallmarks. These are good quality salts by a well regarded maker.

Rare Cape Silver twisted stem Konfyt fork   
Jan Beyleveld, Cape C 1820

A rare Cape Silver twisted stem konfyt (preserve) fork, with spearhead handle and typical Cape floral engraving. This is similar to the pair (item S 1188), but the engraved flower lacks foliage and the only hallmark present is the makers mark, which is very clear.

Rare Cape Silver twisted stem konfyt fork and spoon (matching pair)   
Jan Beyleveld, Cape C 1820

A rare matching pair of twisted stem konfyt (preserve) fork and spoon, the fork having 3 prongs. They have spearhead handles, with typical Cape floral engraving, and very clear hallmarks. Similar forks and spoons are illustrated in Heller's History of Cape Silver (Vol 1, pg 148) and Welz's Cape Silver (pg 41). Byleveld worked from 53 Loop Street and 31 Waterkant Street from 1814 - 1827, when he died age 35.

Rare Cape Silver Butterknife - Fiddle pattern   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1820

Plain Cape butterknife with scimitar blade, and clear Pseudo English hallmarks. The makers mark is not present, but these particular Pseudo marks were only used by Twentyman (mark 134 in Welz, Cape Silver).

Newcastle Silver sugar tongs   
John Langlands I & John Robertson I, Newcastle C 1780

Early pair of bright cut English provincial sugar tongs with clear makers and duty mark, however date and town mark are not present. Quite heavy and solid, have a nice feel. Initials TMM on bow.

George II punch strainer   
Ralph Maidman, London C 1731

A typical early Georgian two handled punch strainer, which was used for straining orange and lemon pips in the preparation of punch, which was a very popular drink in early 18th century Britian (before wine became popular). The bowl is pierced with 81 crosses arranged in a square, surrounded by pierced foliate decoration. The rim is reeded, and the handles are typical of the period. The strainer has an attractive crest of a clenched fist holding 3 three leaf clovers.The bowl interior is hallmarked with the makers mark struck 4 times, 3 of which are partially obscured by the pierced crosses, and one of which is fully intact and very clear.

Cape Silver Tablefork - Lotter   
Willem Godfried Lotter, Cape C 1820

A Fiddle pattern Cape Silver Tablefork by a well regarded Cape Silversmith, with engraved initials AW. The hallmarks are clear, being the makers mark struck twice. Lotter worked as a silversmith from 1810 - 1835, and was regarded by Heller as one of the finest of all Cape silversmiths.

George II Silver Sugar nips   
Phillips Garden (possibly), Unknown C 1740

Early Georgian sugar nips with scroll work arms and scallop shell grips. Scratched initials MD in hinge box. Marks (makers and lion passant) on outer side of finger ring, however the makers mark is only partially visible and appears to be ig (which we are informed could possibly be Phillips Garden). The date mark absent as is usual for nips of this period.

Rare Cape Silver Basting spoon - Jan Lotter   
Jan Lotter, Cape C 1815

Rare Cape Basting spoon (Old English pattern) with a large and deep bowl, and very clear hallmarks. The bowl is also wider than English versions, as can be seen from the comparative photo. The spoon also has a thick drop. Jan Lotter, who worked from 22 Keerom Street, only produced silver for 4 years from 1813 - 1817.

Cape Silver teaspoons (5) - John Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape C 1830

Matching set of 5 Fiddle pattern Cape teaspoons, with engraved initials MIH. Very clear pseudo English hallmarks.

George II Provincial silver Waiter   
John Kirkup, Newcastle 1756

Early provincial waiter of good gauge and in outstanding condition. The waiter has a shell and scroll rim, lion paw feet and an interesting Stag crest. The hallmarks are exceptionally clear, even the castle windows are clear in the town mark! The base is also scratch engraved with the weight, being 7.2 oz pnt.

Rare Silver Onslow pattern Tablespoons (6)   
Thomas Tookey (2, 1781), Smith and Fearn (1, 1787) and Steven Adams II (3, 1804), London 1781, 1787, 1804

A good associated set of Onslow Tablespoons, of good gauge and with good ends, very pleasing to use. The 3 oldest spoons are original Onslow, and have the owners initials L+D scratch engraved on them. The 3 later spoons were converted in late Victorian times, a common practice (Ian Pickford comments in his excellent Flatware book that most Onslow pattern flatware that exists today is converted). A very faint butt joint can be detected on close examination with a loop, but is so faint it cannot be seen by the naked eye and is not visible in photographs. The hallmarks are all clear, the Adams spoons have an indented duty mark.

Cape Silver Tableforks (pair) - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A pair of Fiddle pattern Cape tableforks, with clear English Pseudo hallmarks, but no makers mark. As these marks were only used by Lawrence Twentyman, we can be certain of the maker.

Nathaniel Mills Silver snuff box   
Nathaniel Mills, Birmingham 1830

Beautiful, solid, engine turned box with vacant cartouche. Excellent hinge and very snug closure. This box is a very good weight and slightly larger than other snuffboxes. Attractive thumbpiece and gilt interior.

Cape Silver teaspoons (4) - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1830

Pleasant set of 4 Cape Silver Fiddle pattern teaspoons. Very clear hallmarks showing makers initials between device.

Castle-top Vinaigrette - Kenilworth Castle, Nathaniel Mills   
Nathaniel Mills, Birmingham 1837

A collectable castle-top vinaigrette depicting Kenilworth castle, by the famous maker Nathaniel Mills. The pierced grill has scrolling foliage, the base is engine turned and engraved "Ernest". The hallmarks are clear, on both lid and base. We previously incorrectly identified this castle as Warwick castle.

Irish Silver meat skewer   
Samuel Neville, Dublin 1805

Plain Irish meat skewer with flat blade, and shoulder pattern beneath ring. The hallmarks are very clear, note the lack of a duty mark, as duty was only introduced on Irish silver in 1808. Initials VG. Neville was an extremely well regarded Dublin silversmith, who served as Warden and Master of the Goldsmith's Company. He was elected to the Dublin City Council in 1807.

Garrard Silver coffee pot   
Robert Garrard, London 1836

Beautifully made coffeepot with chased detail, a wooden handle and an ivory finial. Very fine maker, as evidenced by the royal warrant. Very clear hallmarks, (including lid) and "Garrards, Panton Street London" on base. It is interesting to note that even the securing nut that holds the finial in place is hallmarked - true quality!

Scottish Silver Hanoverian tablespoons (pair)   
John Welsh, Edinburgh 1767

A lovely set of early Scottish tablespoons, complete with a double drop, by John Welsh, who was entered in 1742, and who made the Liberta Communion cups. The makers mark and townmark are very clear on both spoons, the date mark and thistle are visible one one spoon (slight wear), and worn on the other.

Scottish Hanoverian Silver tablespoon   
Lothian & Robertson, Edinburgh 1763

Pleasing early Scottish bottom - marked spoon, with very clear hallmarks, and good weight.

Hester Bateman Silver Berryspoons (pair)   
Hester Bateman, London 1775

Beautiful set of ornate berryspoons, originally by Hester Bateman but converted during Victorian times. The conversion must have been done by a master craftsman as the quality is excellent. The gilt bowls display no wear, these spoons have not seen much use. Delightful crest of a dove holding an olive branch, so I suppose these are peace spoons! The hallmarks are very clear, including the Hester Bateman makers mark.

Silver Sauce ladles (pair)   
George Smith & William Fearn, London 1795

Beautiful, elegant, early Old English pattern sauce ladles, with a long drop and engraved initials JIL. Smith and Fearn were leading spoonmakers, and the hallmarks are very clear.

Cape Silver Teaspoon - Daniel Beets   
Daniel Beets, Cape C 1820

Cape Silver Fiddle pattern teaspoon with very clear hallmarks (mark 11 in Welz).

Cape Silver dessert spoon - Daniel Beets   
Daniel Beets, Cape C 1828

Cape Fiddle pattern dessert spoon with an interesting crest, crudely engraved, of a raised arm holding an axe. Hallmarks are clear, DB repeated twice between two stars.

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

Cape Silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, with very clear pseudo English hallmarks, including dutymark, bird, castle and date letter B. No makers mark is present, but as only Lawrence Twentyman used this sequence of marks we can be sure of its origin.

Rare Tain Silver sugar tongs   
Alexander Stewart, Tain C 1825

Very rare set of plain fiddle pattern Scottish provincial sugar tongs with extremely clear hallmarks on both arms - AS TAIN. Initials GC engraved on bow. Stewart was a very skilled craftsman (Quick, Ballance of Silver) who originally worked in Inverness (1796 - 1812), then moved to Tain. He died in 1841. Only 160 pieces of Tain silver by Stewart are known to exist, and only three quarters of these have the TAIN townmark. (Quick, Ballance of Silver). Tain, which has long been a pilgrims destination visiting St Duthac's shrine, is the home of Glenmorangie Whisky, made by "The 16 men of Tain".

Rare Cape Silver Vinaigrette - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1830

An extremely rare Cape Silver vinaigrette, with attractive engraving, a sunburst surrounding a wreath contained in a rectangle on the lid, the base and sides also decorated with naive but attractive zig-zag and dot engraving, typical of colonial Cape silversmiths. The grille is also decorated by hand, with a crude flower and foliage surrounded by hand punched holes in squares. The interior is gilt. Both the lid and base are struck with 3 poorly struck hallmarks, which appear to be the lion passant between 2 castles. However the grille is struck with a very clear LT makers mark, without doubt that of Lawrence Twentyman. The only other known example of a Cape vinaigrette, by Martinus Lourens Smith, appeared at Sothebys Cape Town in February 2007 (Lot 428). None of the Cape silver reference books (Welz, Heller) mention vinaigrettes.

Pair of wine labels, M (Madeira)   
Joseph Willmore, Birmingham 1829 and 1833

A delightful associated pair of Madeira wine labels, with Bacchus masks amongst foliage. The labels were made 4 years apart, but obviously cast from the same mould, by the same maker. The hallmarks on both labels are very clear. The order of the hallmarks is the same, but different punches were used as they are different sizes. This design must have been popular for Willmore to have been producing it for at least a 4 year period. Note the slightly different chain fixture (one has an arm with single loop, the other 2 loops but no arm). One chain appears original, the other is a later replacement.

Cape Silver Konfyt (preserve) Fork   
Martinus Lourens Smith, Cape C 1800

Fiddle Pattern Konfyt fork, typical of those produced in the Cape. The fork is engraved "Irene". Konfyt forks were made and sold as individual items in the Cape (Welz, Cape Silver). The hallmarks are very clear, makers initials MLS between 2 Fleur de Lys (one is unclear). Smith was a VOC employee from Denmark who arrived in the Cape in 1757. He married 4 times, had 10 children and died in 1806.

Irish Silver sugar tongs - Georgian   
William Cummins, Dublin 1814

Georgian Irish Fiddle pattern sugar tongs, with very clear hallmarks. They also have the original owners initials (W over CW) scratch engraved in 18th century style (not script). Cummins worked from 1813 to 1846, so these tongs were made very early in his career. He worked from 31 Exchequer Street, and his name was also recorded as Cumying.

Silver Hanoverian Tablespoons (mixed set of 12)   
Various - Pye, Gosling, Daintry, Sallam, London 1735 - 1770

A unique collection of 12 early Georgian Hanoverian tablespoons, 8 being George II and four being George III. Sets of flatware from this period are extremely rare, most spoons were made singly or in pairs. All the spoons have clear hallmarks, with visible date letters and makers marks (all but 2 have the makers identified). Five of the spoons are shellbacks, two are scrollbacks, the remaining 5 have double drops. Nine spoons have contempory initials and two have later initials. One spoon has an additional later hallmark JP (John Page, 1900), indicating it may have been repaired at this stage. Identified makers include Thomas Pye, Richard Gosling, Marmaduke Daintry and Robert Sallam.

Hanoverian Tablespoons (pair) - Elizabeth Jackson/Oldfield   
Elizabeth Jackson, Elizabeth Oldfield (same person), London 1749, 1750

A very interesting pair of early Georgian Hanoverian tablespoons made by the same person (1 year apart), but with different makers marks (EJ and EO). The first was made in 1749 by Elizabeth Jackson (widow of Charles Jackson), the second circa 1750 by Elizabeth Oldfield (she remarried in 1750, hence the name change - and registered a new mark the same year). Both spoons are of good gauge, and have a long drop. The first spoon has very clear hallmarks, the second has clear makers mark, but other marks worn. One spoon has a worn crest of a dove carrying an olive branch.

Georgian Silver Sugar Sifter   
Peter & William Bateman, London 1809

A delightful ladle shape sugar sifter, with an unusual pattern of stars, crosses and a half moon oval device. The pattern was cut by hand, and appears a little crude. The handle is initialled HI, and the hallmarks are clear with the exception of the makers mark, which is poorly struck, although still discernable.

Bateman Georgian Silver Teapot   
William Bateman, London 1807

Rectangular, plain but elegant teapot on 4 ball feet, characteristic of the style between 1805 and 1810. Wooden handle and ivory finial. Beautiful tree stump crest, excellent hallmarks, including lid.

Irish Silver Freedom Box - Londonderry   
Benjamin Stokes, Dublin C 1760

A rare Irish silver Freedom Box, engraved with the coat of arms of the city of Londonderry, in Northern Ireland. Freedom boxes are typically Irish, and were used as presentation pieces to distinguished non- residents who received the honorary freedom of the city (Bennett, Collecting Irish Silver). Example from Dublin, Youghal, Limerick and Cork are known (Bennett), Londonderry is rare. The coat of arms includes a skeleton sitting on a hill, with a turreted castle, and the George Cross and dagger of London above. The skeleton is thought to represent starvation during the great siege. The city motto "Vita Veritas Victoria" (Life, Truth, Victory) is engraved below. The engraving quality is superb, with delicate flowers and chased C scrolls. The decorated lid is a separate panel that has been set into a presumably plain table snuff box. The box has a curved thumbpull for easy opening, and is gilded interior and exterior, with exception of the base. The only hallmarks present are the makers mark (struck twice, on ...

Cape Silver Konfyt Forks (pair) - Martinus Smith   
Martinus Lourens Smith, Cape C 1800

A delightful pair of Cape silver Konfyt forks, in the rare Fiddle and Shell pattern. The forks also have a bevelled edge, and are single struck. Fiddle and Shell pattern is scarce (Pickford, Silver Flatware), Cape silver in this pattern is very rare. The hallmarks on both forks are very clear, being makers mark MLS between 2 Fleur de Lys. Smith was a Dane who arrived in the Cape in 1757. He married 4 times, had 10 children, and died in 1806 (Welz, Cape Silver).

Irish Silver Soup Ladle   
Richard Sawyer, Dublin 1812

A lovely Irish soup ladle in the Fiddle pattern, with an attractive, naive tulip crest. The handle is beautifully curved, so much that the top of the handle is at right angles to the bowl, which makes holding this ladle a pleasure. The bowl, which is quite large, is shaped with high edges which assists pouring the soup out of the ladle. The hallmarks are very clear. Sawyer worked from Fishamble Street from 1797 - 1812, when he died - meaning this ladle was one of his last works.

Scottish Provincial Silver Soup Ladle - Elgin   
Charles Fowler, Elgin C 1815

A Scottish Provincial Fiddle pattern soup ladle, with exceptionally clear and distinct hallmarks, deeply struck with no wear - these hallmarks are rare. The ladle is a good gauge, very solid, and fit for use, and is engraved with the initial I in contempory style. The bowl has a good shape, with raised edges, a feature of earlier ladles. The hallmarks are makers mark CF, ELGIN, cathedral wall and St Giles. The cathedral hallmark represents the west front of Elgin Cathedral Church (Jackson, pg 601), St Giles is its patron saint. The detail of the hallmarks is very good, with windows, door, double roof and battlements visible in the cathedral, and cloak, nimbus, staff and book visible in St Giles. Charles Fowler worked from 1809-1824, most of his silver is marked ELN (as opposed to ELGIN in full), the combination with the cathedral wall and St Giles is scarce.

Dognose Hanoverian Dutch Silver Tablefork   
Bartholomeus van der Tooren, Rotterdam 1768

Early Dutch bottom-marked silver tablefork, with transitional elements from Dognose to early Hanoverian pattern. The fork has a distinct Dognose, and a very pronounced rib on the front of the fork. The fork has a double drop, with the "Hague Leaflet" (lofje), a little lip at the join of the handle, typical of flatware made in The Hague (as opposed to Amsterdam) (source Dutch Silver, pg 83, MH Gans). The fork is of good gauge, very pleasing to hold, and engraved with the initials HLZW on the back. The hallmarks are exceptionally clear, showing makers mark (triangle device), lion rampant silver guarantee mark (875), Rotterdam city mark, and date letter K for 1768. The fork also has a puzzling and rare 5th hallmark (added later), being the duty mark used in the Netherlands between 1807 and 1810, for articles of foreign manufacture without payment of duty (source Tardy, International Hallmarks on Silver, pg 317). We can only surmise the fork was re-imported into the Netherlands at that time. Thanks to information...

Scottish Silver Toddy Ladle - Robert Gray   
Robert Gray & Sons, Glasgow 1835

A fine example of a Scottish Georgian Silver toddy ladle, by very fine makers. The ladle is Fiddle pattern, and is engraved with the initial C, in contempory style. Toddy ladles are uniquely Scottish, used for that "wee dram" of spirits, but also suitable as sauce ladles. The hallmarks are very clear and detailed (the tree, fish and bell in the Glasgow town mark are all visible), an additional "star" journeymans mark is also present. Robert Gray and Sons of Glasgow produced "some of the finest British silver of the period" (Walter Brown, Finial, June 2006). Silver by Gray can be found with both Glasgow and Edinburgh marks, as between 1784 and 1819 the Glasgow assay office was closed.

Scottish Silver toddy ladles (pair) - unrecorded maker   
Robert Chisholm, Edinburgh 1834

Fine pair of Fiddle pattern Scottish toddy ladles, with engraved initials WG. The makers mark is very clearly RC, possibly Robert Carfrae, who was an Edinburgh unfreeman in the early 1800's (Source Rod Dietert, who wrote Scottish Compendium) - this maker is not recorded in Jacksons. We had originally suggested Robert Clark, this is now proved incorrect as he joined the military and settled in North America circa 1800. Hallmarks very clear. We have now been informed this mark belongs to Robert Chisholm, who worked alone from 1833-1835, when he formed the very successful partnership of Mackay & Chisholm (source Henry Fothringham, Historian to the Incorporation of Goldsmiths of the city of Edinburgh, website www.incorporationofgoldsmiths.co.uk).

Georgian Silver Salts (pair)   
J. W. Story (Joseph William), London 1808

Very fine pair of heavy, embossed rectangular salts on raised base by well known maker. The decoration is embossed scroll, shell and floral with gadrooned rims. The crest is a dove with an olive branch in its beak. These salts are heavy even without the glass liners.

Georgian Silver Helmet Creamer - Bright Cut   
Samuel Godbehere, London 1789

Bright cut helmet shaped cream jug with beaded rim and square base, very typical of the period. Clear hallmarks, with evidence hallmarks were applied before the bright cut engraving. Cartouche has initials engraved on it. Very interesting makers name!

Rare Rattail Brittania Silver Hanoverian Serving Ladle - George I   
Gabriel Sleath, London 1719

An extremely rare, Brittania silver, rattail soup ladle in the Hanoverian pattern, of good gauge. The patination on the ladle is lovely, and the bowl, rattail and handle are in proportion, with no sign of alteration. The ladle has the initials E*G scratch engraved on the back of the handle. The stem rises at a sharp angle (almost 90 degrees) to the bowl, the characteristics of a ladle as opposed to a spoon. Snodin (English silver spoons, 1974, pg 46) describes the earliest ladles as dating from the 1730's, this is a rare early example. The hallmarks are worn but visible, the makers mark is very worn, with only the outline of the shield and a ghosting of the makers initials visible. The date letter is poorly struck, but visible enought to determine D from 1719 fairly confidently. Given the wear on the makers mark, an interesting debate has ensued as to the maker. The first letter is definitely S, the second is unclear, the distinctively shaped shield surrounding the makers mark is clearly visible. We had origi...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Lotter   
Jan Lotter, Cape C 1815

A typical Cape silver konfyt (preserve) fork with 3 tines, in the Old English pattern, with traditional Cape engraved decoration, consisting of crude stars and a zig-zag pattern which extends all the way to the tines. The makers mark IL is very clear. Jan Lotter, who was regarded by Heller as "a highly skilled craftsman", only worked for 4 years between 1813 and 1817, so he probably died young. He made most of the prized Cape silver "lemoenlepels" (orange spoons) known to exist today.

Vinaigrette - Joseph Willmore   
Joseph Willmore, Birmingham 1816

Engine turned vinaigrette with beautiful grille. The cartouche is initialled with initial T, the base has bright cut wrigglework with flowerhead. The interior is gilt. Joseph Willmore is described by Eric Delieb (Silver Boxes) as "a superlative silversmith, who worked in the trade for almost half a century".

Georgian Silver Basting Spoon   
George Smith & William Fearn, London 1795

Basting spoon in early Old English Pattern, with an elegant narrow handle. In later Old English Pattern the handles flatten out. Basting spoons, sometimes called Turkey spoons, are ideal for use as large serving spoons. The hallmarks are clear, although the makers mark is partially worn, only the GS is visible.

Georgian Silver Sifter Ladle   
John Lambe, London C 1776

A Georgian silver sifter spoon in the Old English Bright-Cut Edge pattern, with bottom marked hallmarks indicating a date pre 1777. The bowl has a lovely ornate floral piercing, and a flat base (as expected from original sifters). The Bright-Cut Edge pattern was popular between 1790 and 1800 (Pickford, Silver Flatware, pg 102), so we assume the sifter was updated in style then. John Lambe was a specialist spoonmaker, he worked between 1762 and 1796. His makers mark I*L in oval punch is clear, the lion passant and crowned leopards head are worn but visible, the date letter is very worn but could possibly be the "a" of 1776.

Chinese Export Silver Tablefork - Cutshing   
Cutshing, Canton, China C 1830

A Chinese Export (or China Trade silver) tablefork, in the Fiddle, Thread and Shell pattern, with scarce Union shell (Pickford, Silver Flatware, pg 118). This is a large and hefty fork of good gauge and quality. The hallmarks are extremely clear, being pseudo - English hallmarks lion passant, dutymark, crowned leopards head, date letter k and makers mark CU for Cutshing of Old China Street, Canton. Cutshing was quite prolific, he used a number of makers marks, including CUT, and worked between 1825 and 1875. CU was used during his earlier period (www.chineseexportsilver.com). Chinese export silver, which is stylistically Anglo-American of the late Georgian period, is "known for its fine workmanship and exceptionally heavy weight (Kernan, China Trade Silver, Checklists for Collectors, November 1965).

Scottish Provincial Silver Toddy Ladles (Set of 3) - Aberdeen - Cheeseman and Robertson family crest   
James Pirie, Aberdeen 1821-1826

A rare set of 3 Scottish provincial toddy ladles (Fiddle pattern) made by James Pirie of Aberdeen. All 3 ladles have an interesting crest, a dexter hand holding a kings crown, which is well engraved. This is the crest of the Cheeseman family, it is also used by the Robertson family. The hallmarks JP, ABD, JP are very clear on all 3 ladles. The makers mark JP is quite rare, in fact it is not depicted in Jackson's, although it is recorded in Turner's Scottish provincial silversmiths.

Scottish Silver Toddy Ladle - Richardson Family Crest   
Alexander Wotherspoon, Edinburgh 1830

A Fiddle pattern Scottish silver toddy ladle, with a magnificent crest - a unicorn's head erased above a crown, with the motto "Virtute Acquiritur Honos", translated "Honour is acquired by Virtue". This is the motto of the Richardson family. The crown probably indicates the families membership of the peerage. The hallmarks are very clear, including makers mark AW in strangely indented punch. AW has been attributed to Alexander Wotherspoon (British silver makers marks website) but given the similarity of the punch to JW (John Williamson) there is a high probibility of a family relationship (father and son?), so the maker could be A Williamson.

Cape silver Tablespoons (pair) - Beets   
Daniel Beets, Cape C 1820

Two Cape silver tablespoons in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved initials HV, attractively engraved by hand in Colonial style. The hallmarks are excellent, makers mark DB struck twice between 3 stars (Welz mark 15). Although from the initials we can see they are a pair, they are slightly different in quality, weight and condition. 1 spoon is beautiful, good quality, weight and condition, the other less so, it is lighter and has had a rougher life.

Scottish Provincial Silver Toddy Ladles (pair) - Dundee - Brodie Family Crest   
James Douglas, Dundee 1796-1820

A pair of Scottish Provincial silver toddy ladles, made by James Douglas in Dundee. The ladles are Fiddle pattern, and have a well engraved and attractive crest of a raised fist holding a bundle of arrows. The hallmarks include makers mark JD, and pot of lilies struck 4 times. The 4th pot of lily is at right angles to the other 3. Both ladles have good hallmarks. The crest is the Brodie family crest, a dexter hand holding 5 arrows.

Cape Silver Fish Slice - Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1825

A rare and attractive Cape silver fish slice with an engraved fish on the blade between a row of leaves. The blade is pierced by hand and the engraving is typically Cape including the straight and wavy dotted decoration around the edge. The blade is quite large and oval in shape, and the Fiddle pattern handle is quite short. The join between handle and blade is visible, but is clearly original as the decoration over-rides the join. The hallmarks are very clear, makers mark IC between 2 shell devices (Welz mark 26), all well struck. Cape silver fish slices are quite rare, and ones with an engraved fish even rarer. Welz (Cape Silver) mentions that Twentyman was the only Cape silversmith who added the engraved fish (now clearly incorrect), one by Twentyman is pictured in Heller (A History of Cape Silver, pg 168, plate 74). The engraved fish on the Twentyman slice is very similar in style and design to this one, we hypothesize it was engraved by the same engraver.

Provincial Silver Milk Jug - Exeter   
Simon Levy, Exeter 1821

An interesting antique silver milk (or cream) jug, hallmarked in Exeter but possibly made in Devon. It is oblong in shape, with an unusual cast rim with different types of flowers and thistles, and a very fine engraved band of scrolling foliage around the body. The jug has an ornate leaf and rose capped scroll handle, and 4 bun feet. The jug, casting and engraving is very fine quality, the work of a master craftsman. The 5 hallmarks are all clear, including makers mark SL. The base has an engraved number "10", possibly an inventory number. The oblong shape was popular for tea services between 1805 and 1815 in London, we often see a style lag in provincial centres. Simon Levy produced Exeter hallmarked silver between 1818 and 1832. Of Jewish origin, he was buried in the Jewish burial ground in Exeter, just outside the Roman wall. He was the son of Emanuel Levy, also a silversmith. They resided in the parish of St Thomas, Devon.

Tableforks (6) - Queens pattern   
William Ely, London 1837

A beautiful set of Queens pattern tableforks, extremely heavy (over 100 grams each!), they are wonderful to hold! Interesting crest of a curved topped escutcheon containing a wagon wheel, topped with a helmet and a heron. Hallmarks very clear.

George I Silver Coffee Pot - Newdigate Family Armorial   
Gabriel Sleath, London 1716

A magnificent and rare early Brittania standard silver coffee pot of very good quality, with handle at right angles to the spout, in the Queen Anne style. The pot has a high domed lid with baluster finial, a stand-away hinge, and an octagonal swan neck spout with "Ducks Head" terminal.The pot itself is the tapering plain cylindrical shape with spreading foot, and the handle is turned fruitwood. The coffee pot is plain except for a lovely contemporary armorial, a diamond shaped logenze surrounded by plumes, with the arms of Newdigate (gules three lion's gambs erased argent) impaling a lion rampant reguardant gules. The logenze indicates ownership by a widow of the Newdigate family, as the lozenge is the only vehicle for a widow to display her arms. This plain style is usually called Queen Anne, the shape of coffee pots changed circa 1723, when the lid became flattened and the spout moved opposite the handle (Judith Banister, 3 Centuries of Silver Coffee Pots). As is usual for coffee pots of this era, it is qu...

George II Miniature Silver Coffee Pot - John Hugh Le Sage   
John Hugh le Sage, London C 1740

An extremely rare miniature silver coffee pot by the Huguenot John Hugh Le Sage, subordinate goldsmith to the King. The coffee pot is early Rococo style, with relief chasing of flowers and scrolls around the base and border below the cover. As is expected with early Rococo (1740 - 1750), large areas are left blank, only after 1750 did full Rococo develop which filled in the blanks. The swan neck spout is leaf wrapped, and the wooden handle has a typical double C scroll. The lid, which is richly decorated, has a stepped dome cover and acorn finial. The pot also has a tucked in base and stand-away hinge. The only hallmarks are the makers mark (script JS underneath crown) struck 3 times on the base (Grimwade 1680, Jacksons pg 192). As per the plate act of 1739, silver toys were exempted from assay, and only required the makers mark. A number of silver toys have been attributed to John Hugh Le Sage, many of which today reside in museums, including the Henry Ford Museum (USA) and the Victoria & Albert Museum (V&...

Georgian Silver Teaspoons (6)   
Peter, Ann, William Bateman(2), William Ely & William Fearn(4), London 1800, 1802

Dainty set of Old English pattern silver teaspoons, 4 spoons by Ely & Fearn and 2 by the Batemans, but all with a matching crest (crest is contempory, indicating this set was put together soon after manufacture). The crest is very fetching, with a lion rampant holding a scallop between its fore-paws. Clear hallmarks.

Hester Bateman Silver sugar tongs   
Hester Bateman, London 1778

Pair of bright cut Hester Bateman sugar tongs with very clear hallmarks. Decoration swag and wrigglework with initials JR on bow.

Chinese Export Silver Dessert Spoon - Linchong   
Linchong, Canton, China C 1800-1850

A Chinese export silver dessert spoon in the Fiddle pattern. The pseudo-English hallmarks are in excellent condition, well struck and very clear. They include lion passant with triangular indent to punch, crowned leopards head, duty mark and makers mark L. Linchong was an early maker of Chinese export silver, his silver is usually in the English Georgian style. He worked from New China Street, Canton. Linchong is described as the "unsung Cantonese master Georgian silversmith, who rivals Paul Storr in work quality, whose silver is very rare" - www.chinese-export-silver.com

Indian Colonial Silver Dessert spoon set (6)   
RS and BG, Calcutta C 1830

A set of Indian Colonial silver Dessert spoons in the Fiddle pattern, with rare hallmarks from little known Calcutta goldsmiths. 3 spoons are by RS and 3 are by BG (both makers are listed but unidentified by Wilkinson in his book "Indian Colonial Silver"). The hallmarks are clear but a little worn, BG with tally mark 14 (Wilkinson, pg 27) and RS with the Fish tally mark (Wilkinson, pg 116). Tally marks are thought to be the mark of the indigenous workman who finished the piece. The tally mark 14 also appears on silver from Twentyman & Co. This set was probably put together when new in Calcutta circa 1830, as they all have the same initials DI, exhibiting some wear. Given the differential wear to the bowl tips, we can only assume that the 3 by BG are softer, higher grade silver than the 3 by RS.

Cape Silver Dessert Fork - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A Cape silver dessert fork, in the Fiddle pattern, with 4 prongs, which are quite long. The hallmarks are clear but slightly worn, they include pseudo English duty mark, castle, date letter C and makers mark LT. This is mark 139 in Cape Silver by Welz, the C has a small gap.

Cape Silver Dessert Spoon - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A Cape silver dessert spoon in the Fiddle pattern. The spoon has pseudo English hallmarks, all individually struck, all the hallmarks are very clear. They include duty mark, bird, castle and date letter e, with makers mark LT. This is makers mark 131 (Cape Silver by Welz), although they are struck in a different order, which is quite common. It appears the Cape silversmiths were not too scrupulous about how hallmarks were struck.

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A Cape silver tablespoon in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved owners initials "de C", so probably a Huguenot. The spoon bowl is quite wide and the top of the handle has a very provincial rib and turn. The hallmarks are very clear, and include makers mark LT, and pseudo-English hallmarks (leopards head, date letter a, duty mark and lion passant). This is mark 135 in "Cape Silver" by Welz.

Paul Storr Silver Cream Jug   
Paul Storr, London 1801

An antique silver cream or milk jug by perhaps the most famous of English goldsmiths, Paul Storr. The jug is Neo Classical (Adam) style, as is usual for much of Storr's early work, and is extremely good quality. The jug has a pyriform body, with a border of gadrooning dividing the lower and upper part. The spout is broad, and the handle has a scroll on the base. The interior is gilded, and the base is raised, which has protected the hallmarks. Penzer, in his book "Paul Storr", described Storr as "the last of the great goldsmiths". The hallmarks are excellent, the makers mark P.S is perfect in every way. It is Storr's 4th mark, P.S with pellat in centre, in twin circles in contact, with indent at base producing a point. The base also has the original scratch marks "5 14=171e", "2u320" and "-/XE", we assume weight, style and inventory marks. Storr worked between 1793 and 1838, he died in 1844. He served his apprenticeship with Andrew Fogelberg.

Georgian Silver Sauce Boat - Watts Family Crest   
Daniel Smith & Robert Sharp, London 1761

A very good quality silver sauceboat or gravyboat with shaped rim and leaf capped flying scroll handle, 3 cast hoof feet and a nice crest, a greyhound holding an arrow. The hallmarks are very clear, even the leopards' whiskers are visible! Smith and Sharp were important makers, who made some of the finest silver of the period (Pickford, Jackson's hallmarks). They supplied Parker & Wakelin, the Royal Goldsmiths who supplied the Prince of Wales and "half the nobility of England" (Grimwade, London Goldsmiths). The crest has been identified as belonging to the Watts family, and is described as "A greyhound sejant argent supporting with its dexter foot an arrow or headed and barbed of the first". The heraldic research report is available in our articles section.

Cape Silver Tableforks (pair) - John Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape C 1830

Pair of Cape Fiddle pattern Tableforks, by the highly regarded silversmith John Townsend. The length of the tines is good, and the forks have very clear Pseudo English hallmarks and makers mark. The initials CJH are engraved on the back of the forks. Heller described Townsend as the most versatile of all the English silversmiths at the Cape, capable of excellent craftmanship.

Cape Silver Tablefork -Jan Lotter   
Jan Lotter, Cape 1813-1817

Plain Cape silver tablefork in the Old English pattern, with original owners initials lightly scratched on back (MF). Hallmark very clear, makers mark struck twice, either side of a flower (or bunch of grapes). Jan Lotter was an excellent silversmith who made most of the cape orangespoons (lemoenlepels) found today. He traded from Keerom St.

Rare Antique Silver serving set (basting spoon & matching fork )   
Thomas Walker & Johnathan Hayne, London 1813

Unusual and beautiful Fiddle pattern serving spoon and fork. The spoon bowl is an unusual oval shape. Forks of this size are rare, serving sets even more so. Beautiful stags head crest and clear hallmarks.

George I Silver Rat-Tail Hanoverian Spoon   
Nathaniel Roe, London 1716

An early Georgian silver rat-tail Hanoverian tablespoon, with a pronounced rib on the front of the stem, and oval bowl, as is usual for early Hanoverians. The spoon also has two lovely family crests (correctly engraved on the back of the stem), the first is a snake twisting around a pillar, the second a raised fist holding wheatsheaves, with crosses in the background. The rat-tail pattern first appeared in 1710, the rat-tail disappeared from Hanoverians in 1730. The spoon also has very clear bottom marked hallmarks, including a very clear makers mark (RO under stags head) for Nathaniel Roe. This is a rare mark, it is not recorded in Jackson, and the mark in Grimwade (mark 2396) was a poor impression, largely conjectural, and was undated by Grimwade. The mark is recorded by Wyler (pg 148). Roe was a largeworker who worked in London between 1710 and 1717, when his newly born son died aged 4 days. He then left London for Norwich, where he continued work as a silversmith. He became Sherriff of Norwich in 1737.

Cape Silver Basting Spoon - Lotter   
Willem Godfried Lotter, Cape C 1810

A Cape silver Basting spoon in the Old English pattern, of good gauge, very suitable for use. Whilst the spoon is Old English pattern, the drop is definitely not English in style, it has a European flavour (which shows the different influences on Cape Silversmiths of the time). The hallmarks are very clear, makers mark WGL struck twice, and the inverted L device used by Lotter (mark 95 in Welz). The Lotter family are important in the history of Cape silver, with 12 members of the family known to have produced silver. Willem Godfried, who made this spoon, worked from 1810 - 1835, and is known for good quality work.

Cape Silver Teaspoon - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820

Fiddle pattern Cape teaspoon, with clear hallmarks (Welz no 27) including initials, 2 ladder device in ball, 2 shell device.

Cape Silver Teaspoon - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820

Cape Silver teaspoon in the Old English pattern, with very clear hallmarks, IC and shell. Combrink worked from Dorp Street.

Indian Colonial Silver Salt and Pepper Castors (pair)   
Twentyman, Beck & Co, Calcutta 1822-1826

A pair of Indian Colonial silver salt and pepper castors, cylindrical in shape standing on a raised circular foot, with removable dome shaped lids. Each castor has 3 gadrooned rims, and retain their original engraving "salt" and "pepper". The pepper castor has smaller holes in a different pattern (salt having larger holes for shaking), the pepper also has its original interior gilding. A similar pair is depicted on page 152 of "Indian Colonial Silver" by Wilkinson, who describes their shape and design as being unique to Indian Colonial silver (pg 165). The hallmarks include makers mark TB&Co, 2 pseudo marks (crowned lion passant and lion rampant holding a crown, pg 155 Wilkinson). The lion rampant mark is a reproduction of the crest of the HEIC (Honorable East India Company), which may have indicated official patronage (Wilkinson, pg 155). Twentyman & Beck, who worked between 1822 and 1826 from 4 Tank Square, Calcutta, were also the only Indian Colonial firm to use a crowned lion passant. The 2 castors also h...

Scottish Provincial Silver Gravy Spoons (Pair) - Robert Keay, Perth   
Robert Keay, Perth 1791-1825

A rare pair of Scottish Provincial gravy (or serving or basting) spoons in the Oar pattern, which is a scarce variant of Fiddle pattern (Fiddle without shoulders), only found in Scotland (Pickford, Silver Flatware, pg. 111). Both spoons are engraved in contempory style with the letter "M", and are in such lovely condition that they do not appear to have been used (note the lovely spoon tips). Both have clear Scottish Provincial hallmarks, makers mark RK struck 3 times, and the Perth double headed eagle town mark struck twice. Robert Keay worked in Perth between 1791 and 1825, from the style of these spoons they were made between 1800 and 1805, when Oar pattern was popular in Scotland. A very similar gravy spoon, also by Robert Keay of Perth, is depicted in Ian Pickford's Silver Flatware book, figure 145, pg. 111.

Cape Silver Basting Spoon - Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1815

A rare Cape silver Basting (or Serving) spoon in the Old English pattern, this is a good quality spoon suited for use as a serving spoon. The spoon has a colonial feel, it has an unusual rectangular shaped drop, so was probably made before 1820 when English silversmiths arrived in the Cape and influenced styles. The spoon is quite plain, no crests or initials, but it is engraved "IV" on the back of the stem. This engraving is original and quite crude (typically colonial), perhaps done by the owner himself, possibly indicating it was once part of a set. The hallmarks are excellent, makers mark IC between 2 devices (flowers?), mark 27 in "Cape Silver" by Welz. Johan Combrink was a prolific and well regarded Cape silversmith, he worked between 1814 and 1853, and was based in Dorp street.

Cape Silver Hanoverian Tablespoon - Lotter   
Gerhardus Lotter, Cape C 1810

A lovely early Cape tablespoon in the Hanoverian pattern, with turn-up end. This spoon only has the makers hallmark, which is very worn but still faintly visible. Lotter generally only struck his makers mark, as is the case on this spoon. Lotter, who was part of a large family of silversmiths working in the Cape, was an extremely competent silversmith who made the Cape Town Lutheran Church chalice to match one made in Amsterdam in 1765.

Cape Silver Tablespoons (3) - Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1815

A set of 3 Cape silver tablespoons by Johannes Combrink, who worked in Cape Town between 1814 and 1853. These spoons are excellent quality and robust, well suited for use. The spoons resemble the Old English pattern, but are Continental in design, with a V shaped drop, strong lip on tip and flattening to the top half of the handles. Given the Continental style of these spoons, which is confined to early Cape flatware, we can assume they were made early in Combrink's career, probably between 1814 (when Combrink started producing silver) and 1820, when the English 1820 settlers arrived in the Cape, bringing with them English styles. Each spoon has a small identification nick on the back at the top of the handle (1-2 mm). The makers mark IC (Welz mark 32) is clearly struck on all 3 spoons.

Cape Silver Tablefork - Jan Lotter   
Jan Lotter, Cape 1813-1817

A Cape Silver tablefork in the Old English pattern, with very clear Cape silver hallmarks. The marks include makers mark IL in circular punch struck twice, with an attractive flower mark (mark 74 in Cape Silver by Welz). This fork has contemporary rough, lightly scratched initials MT, probably the original owner, on the back of the fork. This matches item S1148, which is already sold. Jan Lotter was an excellent silversmith, who made most of the Cape lemoenlepels (orange spoons) found today. He traded from Keerom Street, and probably died young, as he only worked between 1813 and 1817.

Apostle Spoon Set (13) - Papal States   
unmarked, Papal States C 1803

A magnificent set of 13 gilded silver Italian apostle spoons, featuring the 12 apostles on the smaller spoons and the "Master" on the larger spoon - all in their original box. They are extremely good quality and well made, the cast finials have very fine detail. The stems are twisted with a beaded design, and a winged female angel joins the bowls to the stems. Each apostle is named on the back of the finial in Italian - (S. Pilip, Giag, Paol, Luca, Mat, Bart, Piet, And, Tom, Mar, Giov, Sim). The spoon bowls are all made of silver coins (Piastra's) from the Papal States (which included most of central Italy in the 18th century) dated between 1676 and 1802. The coins have the Papal Arms for the following Popes: Innocento XI (1676-1689), Alessandro XIII (1689-1691), Innocento XII (1691-1700), Clement XI (1700-1721), Clement XII (1730-1740), Clement XIV (1769-1774), Pius VI (1775-1799) and Pius VII (1800-1823). Two of the coins, dated 1691, are "Sede Vacante" - translated "The Seat is Empty", meaning they were m...

Cape Silver Tablefork and Dessertfork - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820

A matching set consisting of a Cape Silver tablefork and dessertfork, in the Old English pattern, with matching contemporary initials DJ, probably the original owner. The initials are engraved on the back of the forks, in Georgian style. Both forks are good quality, with long tines, and are a good weight. The hallmarks on both are excellent, very well struck and clear, consisting of makers mark IC between the shell and ladder devices used by Combrink. It is interesting to note that the devices are not struck in the same order, so their placement by the silversmith was probably random. This is a combination of marks 26 - 28 in Cape Silver by Welz. Combrink was a member of the well regarded Combrink family of Cape silversmiths.

Antique Silver Sugar Caster   
Thomas & Jabez Daniel, London 1772

Pear shaped baluster caster with spreading base made by the Daniel's, who specialised in casters. Initials ELN are scratch engraved on the base. Both pieces are clearly hallmarked.

Rare Cape Silver Tablespoon - Frederik Herman   
Frederik Lambertus Herman(n), Cape 1810-1811

A very rare Cape silver tablespoon in the Old English pattern, by a very rare maker whose work is seldom seen. The makers mark FLH is excellent, very well struck, this is accompanied by an anchor mark in a circular punch (mark 51 in Cape Silver by Welz). Herman (or Hermann) was born in the Cape in 1778, he worked between 1810 and 1811 from 38 Long Street. He was regarded as "one of the finest of all Cape silversmiths" by David Heller, in his book History of Cape Silver. He made a very fine covered sugar bowl, which is depicted on pg 101 of Cape Silver by Stephan Welz.

Scottish Provincial Silver Basting Spoon - Cameron, Dundee   
Alexander Cameron, Dundee with Edinburgh hallmarks 1824

A Scottish provincial silver basting (or gravy) spoon in the Fiddle pattern, made by Alexander Cameron in Dundee, with Edinburgh hallmarks for 1824. The spoon is good quality and has a good feel, it is suitable for use as a serving spoon. The hallmarks are excellent, and include the "CAM over ERON" and "DUN over DEE" marks used by Cameron, along with very clear Edinburgh marks. Cameron was apprenticed to Robert Keay of Perth, and worked between 1818 and 1849. Following the re-imposition of duties in Great Britian in 1784, a duty mark had to be struck on silver, which in Scotland could only be done in Edinburgh. This meant that the provincial silversmiths had to submit their silver to Edinburgh - often a long arduous journey, so few did. By the 1820's when this spoon was made, provincial silversmiths such as Cameron submitted a portion of their silver to Edinburgh, to satisfy the authorities.

Scottish Provincial Pointed End Tablespoon - Dundee   
Scott & Livingstone, Dundee C 1790

A rare Scottish Provincial pointed end tablespoon, with excellent hallmarks by a scarce maker. The spoon has script initial M (contempory) above the number 8, we assume its position in its original set. The spoon has some overall wear, but is a good weight, still a lovely spoon. Pointed end spoons are uniquely Scottish, the style was never adopted in England. The hallmarks are well struck and very clear, makers mark S.L struck twice, with the Dundee pot of lilies and date letter m. Similar makers can be seen on lot 190, Woolley & Wallis sale of a private collection of Scottish Provincial Flatware, January 2009.

Scottish provincial celtic point tablespoon (Dundee)   
James Douglas, Dundee C 1800

Lovely scottish provincial tablespoon with characteristic celtic point, with the silversmiths surname incised. Initial A. The hallmarks include the crowned shield and "flaming heart" used by Douglas.

Miniature Silver knife and fork (Christening present)   
Aaron Hadfield, Sheffield 1834

A beautiful miniature Kings pattern knife and fork set in original box, probably a christening present. Complete hallmarks on knife, very clear. Hadfield was a well known Sheffield flatware maker

Scottish Provincial Silver Toddy ladle - Rettie and Sons, Aberdeen   
Rettie & Sons, Aberdeen C 1825

A Scottish provincial antique silver toddy ladle, in the Fiddle pattern, engraved with script initials TIR. The bowl is quite wide (5.0 cm) and oval in shape. The hallmarks are very clear and well struck, makers mark R&S and the A,B and D of Aberdeen struck separately. Middleton Rettie and Sons worked in Aberdeen between 1824 and 1891, they are known for their very fine silver.

Provincial Brittania Silver Trefid Spoon - Exeter   
John Manley I, Exeter 1714

A provincial silver trefid spoon, made in Exeter in 1714. The spoon has an oval bowl, rat-tail with ribs, a flat stem and the traditionally shaped end with 2 clefts, with a slight upturn. The spoon is engraved "MH 1707" on the back of the spoon, the MH are co-joined, and the engraving is contemporary. During this period spoons were placed on the table bowl down, hence the engraving on the back. The spoon is quite light, as is often the case with provincial spoons, but in very good condition, given its age. The spoon has 5 hallmarks, makers mark MA co-joined, 3 turreted castle (Exeter town mark), Brittania (very worn), lions head erased (used in Exeter between 1701 and 1720 to denote Britannia silver, which is higher grade than Sterling), and date letter O in shield for 1714. The makers mark appears to be MA co-joined, but could also be read the other way around (?W). We now believe this to be the mark of John Manley I of Dartmouth, who entered his mark in Exeter in 1705 (See mark 86, West Country Spoons and t...

Antique Silver Sugar Tongs - Colonial or Provincial   
TH, Possibly Clonmel, Ireland C 1810

An unusual pair of Fiddle pattern silver sugar tongs, with crude rounded shell grips. The pair is unusually large and heavy, and has flared and shaped arms, and a strong rounded bow. They are quite plain, with no monograms or decoration, besides the shape and shell grips. They are unusual, very unlike any of the sugartongs depicted in "Georgian Silver Sugar Tongs" by Graham Hodges, leading us to believe they are Colonial or Provincial. The only hallmarks are makers mark TH struck twice (once on each arm), the hallmarks are clear. The T is well cut, but the H is fat and less well defined in the punch. There appears to be a faint device between the letters, but this could be an imperfection in the punch. We have been unable to identify any Colonial makers with initials TH (but suggestions welcome!). However, one possible candidate for the TH makers mark is Theophilus Harvey of Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland, circa 1810. A fish server by Harvey, with only the TH makers mark in rectangular punch, is pictured in an a...

Cape Silver Gravy Spoon - Twentyman, Kings Pattern   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A magnificent Cape silver gravy (also called basting or serving) spoon, in the Kings pattern, double struck with diamond heel. It has a lovely weight and is very good quality, this is one of the most substantial Cape silver spoons we have seen, and is suitable for regular use - in fact a spoon anyone would enjoy using. The hallmarks are very clear, makers mark LT for Lawrence Twentyman, and pseudo English hallmarks (leopards head, duty mark, date letter a and lion) - Welz mark 135, but in a different order. Twentyman was the most prolific of all Cape silversmiths, he had the first shop on Heerengracht (now Adderley Street) with a shop window. He worked between 1818 and 1837.

Silvergilt Snuffbox with agate lid   
John Shaw, Birmingham 1820

A beautiful silvergilt engine turned snuffbox with a chocolate brown agate (mocha agate) set in a rim of chased flowers, by a silversmith well known for his boxes. This box has a lovely weight and a pleasing feel.

Cape Silver saltspoon - John Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape C 1830

Cape Fiddle pattern saltspoon complete with makers mark and pseudo english hallmarks (clearly visible), gilded bowl and engraved monogram TTA. The spoon is slightly longer than others we have seen. Townsend was a leading Cape silversmith, who had a shop on Heerengracht in Cape Town, and is regarded as one of the finest and most versatile of Cape silversmiths by Heller.

Rare Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, "Greatest Cape Silversmith"   
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape 1768-1811

A very rare Cape Silver konfyt (preserve) fork, in the Feather Edge pattern. The fork has makers mark DHS, well struck and clear, along with a bunch of grapes with vine leaves in a circular punch (mark 109 in Cape Silver by Welz). Schmidt arrived in the Cape from Strelitz, Germany, as a soldier in 1768. He worked as a sword cutler for the Dutch East India Company, and became a burgher and silversmith in 1779. He died in 1811 (Cape Silver by Welz, pg 139). He is described by David Heller (in his book History of Cape Silver) as the "greatest Cape silversmith". Heller goes so far to describe Schmidt as a "master craftsman, whose work can be compared to Paul Storr" (History of Cape Silver, pg 79).

18th Century Dutch Silver Miniature Milk Jug - Johannes van Geffen   
Johannes van Geffen, Amsterdam 1784

A lovely 18th century Dutch silver miniature milk jug, baluster shape on 3 scrolling feet, with a wavy rim. It is excellent quality, very well made, and in wonderful condition. It was made by Johannes van Geffen, grandson to Arnoldus van Geffen, the most celebrated of all Dutch miniature silver makers. This jug is identical to a jug depicted in Miniature Silver Toys by Victor Houart, pg 62, even the detail on the legs and handle is identical. The one depicted in the book was made in 1762 by Arnoldus van Geffen, so interesting to see the grandson copying his grandfather's work with such exact detail. The hallmarks are very clear, Amsterdam town mark with date letter Z for 1784, and makers mark of a hunting horn in a heart, topped by a crown for Johannes van Geffen. Johannes worked between 1766 and 1798. This milkjug matches a teapot (S 1576) also made by Johannes van Geffen in 1784. A very similar miniature milk jug, made by Hendrik Duller in 1792, is depicted in the book "Tall and Small, Antique Dutch Silver ...

18th Century Dutch Silver Miniature Teapot - Johannes van Geffen   
Johannes van Geffen, Amsterdam 1784

A delightful 18th century Dutch silver miniature teapot, spherical in shape, with S shaped spout, scrolling handle, and original lid. It is excellent quality and in very good condition. A very similar spherical miniature teapot can be found in the V&A museum in London. It is depicted in the book "Miniature Silver Toys" by Victor Houart, pg 67, this teapot was made in 1758. The base is recessed, so the hallmarks are well preserved - Amsterdam town mark, and makers mark for Johannes Van Geffen (hunting horn within heart under crown). The makers mark overstrikes the date letter, but sufficient can be seen to determine that it can only be the Z of 1784. This teapot seems to match the miniature milk jug, S 1575, also made by van Geffen in the same year. Johannes van Geffen, grandson of Arnoldus van Geffen, worked between 1766 and 1798.

Cape Silver Christening Mug   
John Townsend, Cape C 1830

Rare Cape Silver Christening mug, by the highly regarded Cape Silversmith John Townsend. The body is plain and cylindrical, the handle has a lovely leaf cap, and the mug is of good gauge. David Heller, author of "Cape Silver", described Townsend as the "most versatile" of all the English silversmiths who worked at the Cape. The hallmarks are clear, being makers mark and pseudo English hallmarks which are slightly worn (duty mark, date letter a, leopards head and date letter J) -(see Welz, Cape Silver, pg 122).

Cape Silver Dessert Forks (Set of 8) - Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape C 1825

A set of Cape silver dessert forks in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved initials "WAM". These forks have a strong colonial feel, the shape and size differs from the traditional English Fiddle pattern. The forks are a small, delicate size, my better half describes them as "sweet". The hallmarks on all 8 forks are excellent, and consist of makers mark JT (with indent to top of makers mark) with individually struck pseudo English hallmarks (duty mark, lion passant, date letter a and tree), Welz mark 123 in Cape Silver. Townsend was described as "the most versatile of all the Cape English silversmiths" by Heller (pg 101).

Dutch miniature antique silver kettle   
Frederik van Strant Sr, Amsterdam C 1725

A Dutch silver miniature kettle, circa 1725, by the prolific Frederik I van Strant, who made a large number of miniature silver objects in the course of his career (Houart, Miniature Silver Toys). A very similar kettle also by van Strant can be seen in figure 69 of the book described above. Unfortunately this kettle has lost its original lid, this lid is a replica copy of the lid depicted in the book. The makers mark is very clear, the Amsterdam town mark partially visible, and the assay scrape is also present. An almost identical miniature silver kettle, also by Frederik van Strant circa 1725, is depicted in the book "Tall and Small, Antique Dutch Silver Miniatures" by Aardewerk Antiques of The Hague, pg 153, image 346. We highly recommend this book.

Dutch Silver Tea Caddy - Rotterdam Zilver   
Andreas Cornelis Muller, Rotterdam 1754

A magnificent and rare Dutch silver tea caddy, octagonal with baluster shape, with pull off domed lid with 4 sided pointed terminal. The caddy has lovely decoration, combining flowers, shells and acanthus leaves in a simple but effective style. The decoration is all hand engraved, and is a little crude. The caddy is well made and is a good weight, individual hammer marks can be seen on the inside. The caddy is quite small, as is usual for these early octagonal baluster tea caddies, when tea was an expensive commodity. Tea would have been poured from the caddy directly into the teapot, this style pre-dates caddy spoons (Delieb, Investing in Silver, pg 27, where an English version of similar style to this caddy is depicted). The hallmarks are clear and include date letter V for 1754, makers mark V.M in heart for Andreas Cornelis Muller (Schadee, Zilverschatten, Drie Eeuwen Rotterdams Zilver, pg 233), citymark for Rotterdam, Dutch lion assay mark (935 silver, this is higher grade silver than sterling 925 stand...

Antique Silver Georgian Wine Labels (Pair) - Madeira, Teneriffe   
Daniel Hockly, London 1810

A pair of Georgian silver wine labels, engraved "Madeira" and "Teneriffe". They are rectangular in shape, with a reeded border, and are complete with their original chains. Both are fully hallmarked, with makers mark DH for Daniel Hockly, duty mark, lion passant and date letter P for 1810. Daniel Hockly is an interesting silversmith, he started his career in London, entering a mark as a smallworker in 1810, it seems he specialised in wine labels. In 1819 he boarded a ship with his family and sailed for the Cape Colony, as part of the wave of English settlers (now known as the 1820 Settlers). He continued working as a silversmith in the Cape, he is known to have worked in Grahamstown and Graaf Reinet. His most famous work is the staff of office made for Andries Waterboer, Chief of the Griquas (Heller, Cape Silver, pg 62). It is currently in the 1820 Settlers Memorial Museum (a picture can be seen in Cape Silver by Welz, pg 94). Hockly was born in 1787, he sailed for the Cape in the ship Chapman with his wife a...

Antique Silver Georgian Wine Label - Madeira, Daniel Hockly   
Daniel Hockly, London 1810

A Georgian silver wine label, engraved "Madeira", by Daniel Hockly. The label is rectangular with a reeded border, and has its original chain. It is fully hallmarked, the hallmakrs are clear. Hockly emigrated to the Cape Colony as part of the 1820 Settlers, where he continued working as a silversmith, also using a DH makers mark. Hockly is mentioned as one of 5 wine label makers worthy of mention for the quality of their product amongst the new generation of specialists (Wine Labels, 1730-2003, pg 154)

Rat Tail Hanoverian Tablespoons (Pair) - Ridge and Brooke Family Armorial   
John Lampfert, London 1766

A lovely pair of rat tail Hanoverian tablespoons, with an armorial engraved on the back of each spoon. The spoons are very pleasing quality and weight, and in excellent condition. They were made in 1766 by John Lampfert, who worked between 1748 and 1769, he was predominantly a spoonmaker (Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, pg 574). The spoons are "out of period", their style is 1710-1730, so were probably made to match an existing set. The hallmarks are bottom marked, and are in excellent condition.The arms are those of the family of Ridge impaling those of the family of Brooke with the husband dexter (right), Ridge and the wife sinister (left), Brooke. We have commissioned a heraldic report (which accompanies these spoons), it identifies George Ridge and Elizabeth Brooke of Portsmouth, who were married in 1735. The Ridge family estate was Kilmeston Manor, Hampshire. Their son Captain William Ridge was Aide-du Camp to Lord Halifax, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. He also served in America in the 60th Royal American Reg...

Scottish Provincial Silver Hanoverian Tablespoon - John Steven, Dundee   
John Steven, Dundee 1740-1755

A rare and lovely early Scottish Provincial Hanoverian tablespoon, with excellent marks. This is a very fine spoon, good weight and condition, a pleasure to hold. The spoon has a long drop, and quite a wide end with an oval shaped bowl. The spoon is initialled with script letter K, this is contemporary, and is engraved on the back of the spoon. The spoon has four very clear hallmarks, makers mark IS struck twice in a distinctive shaped punch, with two indentations on each side of the punch. The third hallmark is the Dundee "Pot of Lilies" town mark, the shape of each lily clearly visible. The forth mark is a letter "M" with unusual shape, occasionally used by John Steven (Turner, Directory of Scottish Provincial Silversmiths, pg 62, and Jackson, pg 600). A similar spoon by John Steven, without "M" mark, was sold as Lot 192 of "Private Collection of Scottish Provincial Flatware, Woolley & Wallis, January 2009, pg 34". John Steven was a very fine silversmith, we have just seen a pair of cast candlesticks...

Chinese Export Silver Tablespoon - Sunshing   
Sunshing, Canton, China 1790-1830

A Chinese export silver tablespoon by Sunshing, with excellent hallmarks, they could not be better. The hallmarks include makers mark SS, both of the S's are very distinctive with a t junction at the end of the letter. Hallmarks also include English pseudo marks including lion passant (with fringes on the head), crowned leopard's head townmark, date letter C and duty mark.

Chinese Export Silver Tablespoon - Indian Colonial Retailers Mark, Linchong   
Linchong, Canton, China C 1830

A highly unusual Chinese Export silver tablespoon in the Fiddle pattern, complete with "pseudo English" hallmarks, used by Linchong of Canton, alongside Indian Colonial silver hallmarks, used by R.S. of Calcutta. The hallmarks are clear, and include the pseudo lion passant, crowned leopards head, date letter L and duty mark as used by Linchong of Canton, who made silver in the Georgian style. The Indian Colonial marks include makers mark RS (unidentified) and a tallymark (No. 18, Indian Colonial Silver, Wilkinson), the tallymark is thought to identify the journeyman who completed the piece. One possible scenario is that the spoon was produced in Canton, and imported into Calcutta, India by RS, who was possibly a retailer only. We would be interested in hearing other opinions on this unusual spoon. This very spoon and it's hallmarks is depicted in the book "Indian Colonial Silver" by Wynyard Wilkinson, page 116, where the author noted the lack of connection of the marks, but did not identify the maker Linchong...

Chinese Export Silver Dessert Spoon and Fork - Canton   
C.C, Canton, Canton, China C 1800-1850

A Chinese export silver dessert spoon and fork, in the Fiddle, Thread and Shell pattern. This pair is exceptionally good gauge, this is probably the heaviest dessert spoon and fork we have ever encountered, over 80 grams each, in fact heavier than many tablespoons and forks. They are typical of the good quality, early Chinese export silver that imitated the plain English Georgian silver styles. The hallmarks are clear on both, and include "pseudo English" crowned leopards head, duty mark and lion passant, along with makers mark CC. The lion hallmark punch is quite distinctive, the right hand edge merges with the back leg of the lion. CC is an unidentified silversmith who worked from Canton between 1800 and 1850, generally producing good quality silver.

Chinese Export Silver Tablespoons (Pair) - Yatshing   
Yatshing, Canton, China C 1800-1850

A rare pair of Chinese Export silver Fiddle pattern tablespoons, with a good set of pseudo-English hallmarks. The hallmarks include pseudo sterling lion, pseudo crowned leopard's head, makers mark YS and pseudo Georgian duty mark. One spoon has excellent marks, with good detail, the other spoon marks are still good, but have some wear. Chinese Export silver is "stylistically Anglo-American, of the late Georgian period, of fine workmanship and exceptionally heavy weight" - (Kernan, China Trade Silver - Checklists for Collectors Nov 1965) - these spoons are no exception. The website www.chineseexportsilver.com also notes that "Yatshing silver is always of a high standard".

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Pair) - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820

A fabulous pair of Cape silver tablespoons in the old English pattern, with a beautifully engraved contemporary family crest, a rabbit or hare jumping over a rock. The spoons are good quality and weight, and are well preserved. Both are struck with makers mark IC for Johannes Combrink, one is very clear, the other is slightly worn. The spoon terminals have a strong turn and rib on the back, and an unusual shaped drop, very colonial in style. We have not identified the family crest (suggestions welcome), perhaps Haas or Haasbroek? This pair are amongst our favourite Cape silver items, they are lovely spoons.

York Silver Teaspoon Collection (6) - Barber, Cattle, North   
Barber, Cattle, North, York 1809-1844

An interesting collection of York silver teaspoons, with well struck and interesting York silver hallmarks. The oldest spoon is Old English pattern, the other 5 are Fiddle pattern. The spoons are as follows: 1. Old English, Robert Cattle & James Barber, 1809, Mark 16, Baggott, pg 89 (An Illustrated Guide to York Hallmarks 1776-1858) 2. Barber, Cattle & North, 1828, mark 21 Baggott, pg 89 - half moon journeymans mark, engraved "Kathleen". 3. Barber, Cattle & North, 1831, mark 23 Baggott, pg 90, engraved initials ED in script, contemporary. 4. Barber & North, 1835, mark 24 Baggott pg 90, defect to corner of punch. 5 & 6). Pair, Barber & North, 1844, mark 25 Baggott pg 90, defect to edge of punch. As can be seen form the photographs, the marks are well struck and quite varied. Robert Cattle, originally in partnership with George Cattle, John Hampston and John Prince, took James Barber into partnership in 1808. The partnership was dissolved in 1814. Robert Cattle was Lord Mayor in 1840, he died in 1842 (Mu...

American Coin Silver Sugar Tongs - Charleston, South Carolina   
John Ewan, Charleston, South Carolina C 1823-1852

A rare pair of American Coin silver Fiddle pattern sugar tongs, made by John Ewan of Charleston, South Carolina, circa 1830. The tongs are plain, with no engraving, and have traditionally shaped rounded bowls. The tongs have very clear hallmarks on both arms, makers mark "J Ewan" in serrated rectangle, and pseudo English crowned leopards head and lion passant (both very quaint!). John Ewan lived between 1786 and 1852, he is believed to have produced silver between 1823 and 1852 (Ensko, American Silversmiths and their Marks, pg 294). Of interest is that these hallmarks are depicted in Wyler (The Book of Old Silver), where he incorrectly describes them as Jamaican (pg 207). Coin silver is the term used to describe silver produced in America from early Colonial times until just after the Civil war, when the Sterling standard was adopted. As the name describes, the source was European silver coins, which were melted down.

Rare Cape Silver Tablespoon - Johann Voight   
Johann Voight, Cape C 1790

A Cape silver tablespoon in the Old English pattern, with rare makers mark, which is very well struck. The tablespoon has a long drop, and initials "TA" on the back of the spoon, dating this spoon to the 18th century. The marks include makers mark "IVC" struck twice, either side of a very clear fish hallmark, complete with mouth, eye, fins and scales, this hallmark is very well struck. This is mark 171 in Cape Silver by Welz, who lists it as an unknown makers mark. The fish in Welz is not as clear as this actual hallmark. Welz also depicts the mark as "I:VG", so it must be a different punch - the dots are not present here, but the C could easily be a G. This mark is also depicted by Heller (History of Cape Silver, Vol 1) on page 163, where the fish detail is clearly visible - he attributes this mark to Johann Voigt (?), indicating the attribution had not been proved. Overall an interesting and rare Cape silver mark, extremely clear, this needs further research.

18th Century Dutch Silver Miniature Tea Kettle - Frederik van Strant II   
Frederik van Strant II, Amsterdam 1737

An early 18th century Dutch miniature silver tea kettle, made in Amsterdam in 1737 by Frederik van Strant II, son of Frederik van Strant, who also specialized in silver miniatures. The kettle is baluster shape, with S shaped spout, and original domed lid with baluster finial. The handle is twisted silver wire in a rope design. The hallmarks are very clear, and include Amsterdam town mark and date letter C for 1737, and makers mark F over FS within a circular punch, for Frederik van Strant the Younger. Both father and son specialised exclusively in silver toys, and are one of the 3 great families, alongside the van Geffens and van Somerwils, who characterised the "Golden Age" of Dutch silver miniature toys. Frederik van Strant II worked between 1727 and 1754.

18th Century Dutch Miniature Silver Teapot - Johannes van Geffen   
Johannes van Geffen, Amsterdam 1783

A lovely 18th century Dutch silver miniature teapot, with an interesting inverted pear shape, scrolling handle, S shaped spout and baluster finial. The foot is banded, the base is concave so the hallmarks have been perfectly preserved. It is quite heavy and well made, a pleasure to hold. The hallmarks include makers mark of a hunting horn in a heart, under a crown, for Johannes van Geffen (1766-1798), grandson of Arnoldus van Geffen. The makers mark overstrikes the date letter, but sufficient can be seen to determine it is Y for 1783, given the shape it could not be any other date letter. The Amsterdam town mark is clearly visible. The van Geffens were one of the 3 great families of Dutch miniature silver makers (Houart, Miniature Silver Toys).

18th Century Dutch Silver Miniature Toy Kettle - Arnoldus van Geffen   
Arnoldus van Geffen, Amsterdam 1733 or 1758

A rare 18th century Dutch silver miniature kettle, by Arnoldus van Geffen, the most famous of all the Dutch silver miniature makers. The kettle is circular with an S shaped spout and baluster finial, and has a swing handle, with lovely detail. An almost identical kettle, with a slightly less detailed handle, is pictured in the book "Miniature Silver Toys, Victor Houart, pg 51". This kettle, which is in the V&A museum in London, was also made by Arnoldus van Geffen in 1748. The same kettle is also pictured in "Silver Toys and Miniatures" by Miranda Poliakoff, pg 23, a V&A museum publication. The hallmarks are very clear, and include makers mark for Arnoldus van Geffen, a hunting horn in a heart. The Amsterdam town mark (crown above 3 crosses)is also present, alongside date letter capital Y for either 1733 or 1758 - these marks are very clear. Arnoldus van Geffen, who worked between 1728 and 1769, has been described as "the undisputed world leader in the field of miniature silverware" by Victor Houart, "Miniatu...

18th Century Dutch Silver Miniature Chocolate Pot - Hendrik Duller   
Hendrik Duller, Amsterdam 1787-1799

A delightful 18th century Dutch silver miniature chocolate pot, by Hendrik Duller. The pot is pear shaped, sits on 3 feet, and has a turned wooden handle at right angles to the pouring spout. The removable lid fits snugly, the stirrer is missing. An identical chocolate pot, also by Hendrik Duller, is pictured on pg 67 of "Miniature Silver Toys" by Victor Houart, which is described as "a wonderful pear shaped chocolate pot on 3 feet in the form of volutes, with wooden handle at right angles to spout" (pg 76). This pot is in the V&A museum, and is also depicted on pg 27 of "Silver Toys and Miniatures" by Miranda Poliakoff, a V&A museum publication. Houart also describes Hendrik Duller as "the last great specialist in the field", pg 76. The hallmarks include makers mark HD, Amsterdam town mark and a date letter that is only partially visible. The date letter could be C, G, O or Q, so either 1787, 1791, 1797 or 1799. Hendrik Duller worked between 1776 and 1811. An almost identical miniature chocolate pot, Hendrik...

Georgian Scottish Silver Dessert Spoons (Set of 4) - Patrick Robertson   
Patrick Robertson, Edinburgh 1783

An interesting set of 4 Scottish silver dessert spoons in the Old English pattern, made by a highly regarded silversmith, Patrick Robertson. The spoons are bottom marked, and are engraved with a floral device. The hallmarks are excellent, including makers mark "PR" for Patrick Robertson, which is well struck. Robertson had a long and distinguished career, he worked between 1751 and 1790. He was born in 1729, and was apprenticed to Edward Lothian in 1743. He was Deacon in 1755 and 1765, and was a member of the Royal Company of Archers. He was related to the architect Robert Adam ("Silver Made in Scotland", Dalgleish and Fothringham).

Hester Bateman Georgian Silver Table Spoons (Set of 6)   
Hester Bateman, London 1776

A fabulous set of six Georgian Silver Old English table spoons by Hester Bateman, the most famous of all English female silversmiths. The spoons are bottom marked, and the hallmarks are slightly squashed but clearly visible. The spoons have a double drop. The spoons are excellent quality and are in extremely good condition, this is a lovely set. The spoons also have a interesting family crest, an armoured fist holding a dagger. Hester Bateman took over her husband's business on his death in 1760, and retired in 1790 when her sons, Peter and Jonathan took over the business.

Rare Scottish Provincial Silver Soup Ladle - John Keith, Banff   
John Keith, Banff C 1790

A rare Scottish Provincial silver soup ladle, made in Banff by John Keith. This is a beautiful ladle, long and elegant, it is also very substantial, a pleasure to use. The ladle is Old English, and has a contemporary engraved initial "M". The ladle also has an unusual drop, bowl shaped with a ridge. The hallmarks include makers mark "IK" for John Keith, capital letter "B" (thought to represent Banff), and capital letter "M" (used by Keith , possibly to represent a date letter). The hallmarks are clearly legible, but the bottom left of both the "B" and "M" mark is not visible, probably as a result of not being well struck. We have dated this ladle to circa 1790, so early on in Keiths career.

Scottish Provincial Silver Toddy Ladle - David Manson, Dundee   
David Manson, Dundee 1809-1818

A Scottish provincial toddy ladle in the Old English pattern, with circular bowl and a long, elegant, curving handle. The ladle is engraved with script initials AP, which are contemporary. The hallmarks include makers mark DM struck twice, either side of the Dundee town mark, a "Pot of Lilies". The pot of lilies is the arms of the burgh of Dundee (Jackson pg 598), the pot has 2 handles, clearly visible here. The hallmarks are clear, with slight wear to the lilies at the top of the mark. David Manson worked between 1809 and 1818, his work is quite rare.

Antique Silver Marrow scoop (long drop)   
John Schofield, London 1779

Plain marrowscoop with a long drop, in lovely condition and with very clear hallmarks. The makers mark is very deeply struck. Schofield, who worked from Temple Bar, was reknowned for his impeccable craftmanship. He worked for the Royal Silversmiths Jeffries, Jones and Gilbert.

Silver Marrow scoop (snake crest)   
John Muns, London 1765

A beautiful scoop in excellent condition, with very clear hallmarks. In addition, this scoop has an interesting bundled snake crest, also in excellent condition. This scoop is also slightly larger and heavier than others we have seen.

Rare Cape Silver Napkin Holder   
Dominique du Moulin, Cape C 1825

An extremely rare and unusual Cape silver Napkin (serviette) holder. The holder has an arm that hooks into a buttonhole, and a clamp that is opened or closed with a sliding ring. The clamp end is decorated in a very crude shell, and the sliding ring is crudely banded. This item could be unique, made by special commission, as none of the Cape silver reference books describe napkin holders. The hallmark is very clear (DBD between two stars, mark 44 in Welz). Dominique Badouin du Moulin was a Belgian from Mons (Bergen), who worked as a silversmith in the Cape between 1818 and 1833 (Welz, Cape Silver). He married the sister of silversmith Jan Beyleveld.

Cape Silver Tableforks (set of 6) - Rare Kings Pattern   
Lawrence Twentyman (4), Fredrik Waldek (2), Cape C 1830

Lovely set of Kings pattern (with diamond point) Cape tableforks, of very good quality and gauge - the forks are 100 grams each, very heavy to hold. Cape flatware in Kings pattern is fairly rare, the most prevalent patterns being Fiddle and Old English. These forks all have the same English pseudo hallmarks (leopards head, date letter A, duty mark and lion, Welz mark 135), struck by the same punch in the same workshop. However, 4 have the maker mark LT (Twentyman), and two have the makers mark FW (Waldek). This is not unusual, as Waldek worked for Twentyman, and probably took over the business when Twentyman departed for India, circa 1835.

Scottish Georgian Silver Celtic Pointed Tablespoons (Pair) - Alexander Ziegler   
Alexander Ziegler, Edinburgh 1796

A pair of Georgian Scottish silver Celtic Pointed pattern tablespoons, by Alexander Ziegler, who worked in Edinburgh between 1782 and 1802. These are elegant spoons, and although tablespoons are large enough to be used as serving spoons today. Celtic Pointed (or Pointed Old English) is a style used in Scotland and Ireland, not seen in English silver (Pickford, Silver Flatware, pg 96). The spoons have contemporary engraved initials TB in traditional Scottish style. The hallmarks on both spoons are clear.

Early Cape Silver Hanoverian Tablespoon - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt   
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape C 1780

An early Cape silver tablespoon, in the Hanoverian pattern (with turned up end). The pip at the top of the stem is very pronounced, sufficient that the spoon can "hang" from a finger!. This spoon also has a very unusual "fat" drop, also with a pronounced pip, we have not seen this feature before. This probably indicates the spoon was made early on in Schmidt's career. The spoon has makers mark DHS for Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, described by Heller (History of Cape Silver) as the Cape's "Greatest Silversmith". This spoon is extremely good quality, it is pleasing to hold. The second mark is the bunch of grapes used by Schmidt. Schmidt was originally a soldier and sword cutler from Germany, he arrived in the Cape in 1768 with the VOC (Dutch East India Company). He worked until 1811 (Welz, Cape Silver, pg 139).

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johannes Beyleveld   
Johannes Beyleveld, Cape 1814-1827

A Cape silver konfyt (preserve) fork in the Fiddle pattern, with 3 tines. The only hallmark is the makers mark J.B which is clear, mark 16 in Cape Silver by Welz. Beyleveld was born in the Cape in 1792, he worked from Waterkant and Loop Street.

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A Cape silver tablespoon in the Fiddle pattern, with pseudo English hallmarks. The spoon bowl is long and elegant, and the spoon is good quality and is pleasing to hold. The hallmarks are very clear (Welz mark 148 in Cape silver) and nicely detailed, even hair is visible on the duty mark, and the flag is visible on the castle. The base of the duty mark is cusped, and the makers mark LT is also clear.

Cape Silver Berry Teaspoon - Waldek   
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1830

A rare Cape silver berry teaspoon, in the Fiddle pattern, with gilded berried bowl and decorated handle. The spoon must be well travelled in it's early life, as the spoon was made in Cape Town circa 1830, and probably "berried" in London in mid to late Victorian times, when the practice of "berrying" was popular (this practice is unknown in Cape silver). Plain Georgian silver spoons were embossed and chased with fruit and foliate scrolls (Pickford, Silver Flatware, pg 70), and the bowl was gilded to complete the effect. The hallmarks are very clear, makers mark FW and pseudo English hallmarks (leopards head, date letter a, duty mark and lion passant), these are mark 163 (Cape silver by Welz). These are the same punches used earlier by Twentyman, Waldek took over Twentyman's shop and workshop in 1836.

Colonial Indian Silver Dessert Set (6 forks, 6 spoons)   
Hamilton & Co, Calcutta C 1830

Set of 12 Fiddle pattern dessert spoons and forks, made by Hamilton & Co, the "Garrards of India". All 12 have a crest and set of initials (AD), the crest (which are worn but visible) is a dove with an olive branch in its beak, under the motto "Nil Nisi Fidum" (translated "Nothing but Trust"). All are clearly hallmarked with maker mark, elephant, the capital letter A and a variety of tallymarks.

Antique Silver Gilt Snuff Box - Thomas Shaw, Thomas Ogilvy, Francis Philips   
Thomas Shaw, Birmingham 1828

A magnificent silver gilt snuffbox with a superb finely detailed battle scene. The gilding on the battle scene has different tones, the base has a deeper rich red tinge, this fades to a lighter yellow gold colour in the sky. The box is exceptional quality and a pleasing weight. The sides and rim are richly decorated with cast flowers and thistles, which leads us to believe it is possibly a Scottish battle scene (we welcome opinions!). The battle is being fought with swords, battleaxes, lances, shields, armour and horses, no sign of firearms. The detail includes a castle in the background, flags, finely detailed armour and armorials on the shield - the work of a master craftsman. The base is engine turned, and has a blank cartouche. The interior lid is engraved "Presented to Thomas Ogilvy Esqr, by the New Quay Company of Manchester, as a mark of their gratitude, for his great attention & trouble as arbiter, in the investigation of the disputed claim, made on them by Messrs Francis Philips & Sons, 1829". The en...

George II Silver Marrow scoop   
Elizabeth Oldfield, London 1752

Plain marrowscoop, by specialist spoonmaker Elizabeth Oldfield. This scoop is very dainty, being smaller than later versions. Oldfield was the widow of silversmith Charles Jackson, and had a previous mark as Elizabeth Jackson. She remarried in 1750, when the mark pictured here was registered. The hallmarks are clear, and the original owners initials "WY" are scratched in small letters next to the makers mark.

Cape Silver Hanoverian Basting Spoon - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt   
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape C 1780

A rare Cape silver Basting (or serving) spoon, by the Cape's "Greatest Silversmith" Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, as described by Heller in History of Cape Silver. The spoon is Hanoverian in style, with a very pronounced "turn up" end, almost 90 degrees to the spoon handle, a strong pip and a rib on the front of the handle. The spoon also has a double drop, and the stem changes from rounded to flattened. The spoon is a very good guage, with solid bowl and strong tip, very suitable for use. The hallmarks include makers mark HNS (mark 174 and 175 in Welz, Cape Silver) and a bunch of grapes. This was described as an unknown maker by Welz, but it is now accepted that this is the mark of Daniel Schmidt, with some wear and damage to the punch so the D looks more like an H (see Welz marks 108 and 109). The presence of the bunch of grapes, identical to that used by Schmidt, confirms this. The only other Cape silversmith to use a bunch of grapes was Jan Lotter, his bunch is quite distinctly different. Further confirmation ...

Georgian Silver Christening Mug   
Joseph Angell I, London 1821

A Georgian silver baluster Christening mug, embossed with a delightful scene of a child sitting with a squirrel under trees, with a butterfly hovering overhead. Additional decoration includes a variety of flowers and scrolling foliage. The double scroll handle is capped with an acanthus leaf scroll, and the spreading base is gadrooned. The mug is engraved "EW, The Gift of his Grandmother, Mrs Walton", and the interior is gilded. Joseph Angell I was the first member of the Angell family of silversmiths, described by Pickford as "very fine 19th century family of goldsmiths" (Jacksons hallmarks). The makers mark, lion and London town mark are very clear, the date letter and duty mark are worn but still legible. 1821 is the year the London townmark leopard's head lost his crown.

Cape Silver Konfyt Forks (Pair) - Christiaan Kruger   
Christiaan Kruger, Cape C 1780

A lovely pair of Cape Silver Konfyt (Preserve) forks, made by Christiaan Kruger circa 1780. The forks are 3 pronged, indicating its early age, and have pointed terminals. They have typical Cape engraving, with a double banded wavy prick engraved border, and attractive star on terminal, above original initials IK. Both forks are struck with makers mark CK (Welz mark 61), one of the marks has been double struck. Kruger was born in the Cape in 1761, and apprenticed in 1773. He married Hester de Villiers in 1784.

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Gerhardus Lotter   
Gerhardus Lotter, Cape C 1810

A rare Hanoverian pattern 3 prong Cape silver Konfyt (preserve) fork, by Gerhardus Lotter, this fork has loads of character, we really like it. The fork has a pronounced Hanoverian rib on the front, and original engraved initials PM on the back (18th century flatware was engraved on the back, when they were placed tines down on the table). The fork also has an unusual V shaped drop, more Continental in style than English. The fork is hallmarked twice with makers mark GL (Welz mark 70), the punch is quite crude, the G looks more like a C, possibly worn. Gerhardus Lotter, son of Johannes Casparus Lotter, was part of the Lotter family of Cape silversmiths. He was born in 1764 and died in 1824, Welz records him working between 1810 and 1824 (Cape Silver, pg 135). From the style of this fork we would date it circa 1785, well before English influence arrived at the Cape, so perhaps Lotter worked earlier than suggested by Welz.

Irish Georgian Silver Bright Cut Sugar Tongs   
John Daly, Dublin 1786-1809

A beautiful Irish Georgian silver sugar tongs, with bright cut engraving, Irish "Star" and shell style bowl. The tongs also have a well engraved Lions head family crest in one of the cartouches on the side. No initials are engraved on the bow. The tongs are very good quality, as you would expect from Irish Georgian silver. The tongs have 3 hallmarks, crowned harp for Dublin in rectangular punch with cut corners (used 1793-1809), makers mark JD in script in oval punch, and Hibernian duty mark. No date letter is present, as is usual on Georgian silver tongs (Hodges, Georgian Silver Sugar Tongs, pg 198). John Daly worked between 1786 and 1809, from the style of the tongs we place them circa 1795. Irish tongs by Daly are probably rare, as they were not recorded by Hodges in the book described above.

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Daniel Collinet   
Daniel Collinet, Cape C 1810

An interesting Cape silver tablespoon, that appears more Continental than Cape in style. It is Fiddle pattern, but without the shoulders seen in English Fiddle pattern, and the drop has a wide oval shape, another Continental silver feature. The spoon has a single hallmark, makers mark DC, well struck but by quite a crude, home made punch, with flaws in both letters. This punch is a different one from the one depicted in Welz (Cape Silver, pg 146, mark 21), but has been noted on other Cape Silver, so we are confident it is by Collinet (no other Cape silversmiths have initial DC). Collinet was born in Liege, Belgium, he worked in the Cape between 1810 and 1825. We assume he made this spoon early in his career, certainly before 1820 when a number of English silversmiths arrived in the Cape and dictated the style of silver.

Cape Silver Kings Pattern Dessert Spoon - Fredrik Waldek   
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1830

A rare Cape silver Kings pattern (with diamond point} dessert spoon, by Fredrik Waldek. The spoon has original engraved initials HMC, and is very good quality and gauge, as is usual for Cape Kings pattern silver, very suitable for use. The hallmarks include makers mark FW with the Cape Stub mark (see article in our articles section) of 4 pseudo English hallmarks struck in a stub (Welz mark 165). Fredrik Waldek was also a chronometer, clock maker and jeweller. Heller (History of Cape Silver) commended Waldek for "excellent workmanship", this spoon is no exception. Only Waldek and Twentyman produced Kings pattern in the Cape.

Cape Silver Teaspoons (Pair) - John Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape C 1824

A pair of Cape silver teaspoons in the Fiddle pattern, with excellent hallmarks. The spoons also have a very faint and crudely scratched owners initial S on the back above the hallmarks, barely visible. The individually struck hallmarks include makers mark JT for John Townsend, pseudo duty mark, pseudo date letter a, pseudo leopards head town mark and pseudo date letter J (Welz mark 122, but struck in a different order). John Townsend (1800-1875) was an interesting character, descibed by Heller as one of the top 5 Cape silversmiths. He arrived in the Cape in 1821 on the ship Duke of Marlboro, and was involved in a number of businesses, including a hotel and auctioneering business, in addition to being goldsmith, silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker. He was embroiled in a number of court cases, mostly due to bad debt, in 1849 he stated "insufficient means to support his 10 children". He moved to Okiep in Namaqualand in 1852 as Manager of Spektakel Copper Mine, but was insolvent by 1868. He died in 1875, and is...

Rare incuse duty mark silver tablespoons (4)   
George Smith III, London 1785

A good set of early Old English tablespoons, with narrow elegant handles characteristic of the earlier Old English pattern. These spoons also have the initial B, and very clear hallmarks. These spoons all have the rare incuse duty mark (George III looking left), which was only in use for 18 months. As can be seen from the photographs, these marks are well struck and remain crisp, with no wear. George Smith was a prolific spoonmaker, this period predates his partnership with William Fearn (1786), the firm later became Eley and Fearn.

Cape Silver Salt Spoon - Rare INCE Makers Mark (not shown in Welz)   
Joseph Ince, Cape C 1823-1828

A rare Cape silver salt spoon, in the Fiddle pattern, struck twice with a makers mark not depicted in any of the Cape silver reference books (although Ince is recorded in both Morrison and Welz). The spoon is struck twice with makers mark INCE, which is very distinct. The spoon is quite crudely made, slightly out of shape, it appears hand made in primitive conditions, it has a strong Colonial feel. The makers mark INCE is recorded by Turner as unascribed Scottish Provincial (Directory of Scottish Provincial Silversmiths, pg 84). It was also recorded as "unascribed Scottish" by Jackson (2nd edition, pg 557, on a tablespoon circa 1770, owned by The Marquess of Breadalbane) - this had been corrected by the third edition. We believe that the possible Scottish attribution is incorrect, and should be corrected to Cape. A number of other Cape silver items made by Joseph Ince are known, including 3 items in the Mullne collection, now in a museum in Pretoria, all struck twice with INCE. In addition, a South Africa...

Scottish Provincial Silver Soup Ladle - John Heron, Greenock   
John Heron, Greenock 1790-1840

A rare Scottish provincial soup ladle, made by John Heron in Greenock. The ladle is the attractive Celtic Pointed pattern (Old English pointed, Pickford, Silver Flatware, pg 96), which was only made in Scotland and Ireland. The ladle has original engraved initial E, in traditional Scottish style. This is a large, substantial and heavy ladle, with a generous circular bowl, a pleasure to use. The hallmarks are excellent, very clear, just a portion on the right of the sailing ship not visible, it was not well struck on that side. The hallmarks include makers mark JH, anchor, 3 masted sailing ship complete with sails, rigging and flying pennants, initial C and oak tree (Turner, Directory of Scottish Provincial Silversmiths, pg 68, and Jackson pg 605. The anchor and sailing ship relate to Greenock's history as an important port and shipbuilding centre, the oak tree refers to the town's original name (Green Oak).

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johan Hendrik Vos   
Johan Hendrik Vos, Cape 1761-1810

A Cape silver konfyt fork by the respected silversmith Johan Hendrik Vos, part of the Vos family of Cape Silversmiths. The fork is quite long and elegant, in the Old English pattern, and has no engraving. It has 3 tines, (later forks have 4 tines), so probably dates to before 1800. The fork also has a wide semi circular drop, also indicative of a date before 1800. The hallmarks are excellent, and consist of a square punch with 4 dots struck twice, either side of makers mark JHV in script in oval punch (Welz mark 152, Cape Silver and Silversmiths). Vos worked between 1766 and 1810, he apprenticed with Johann Hasse between 1761 and 1766. He married in 1770 and had 12 children, his wife Elizabeth continued his business after he died in 1810 by adding the hallmark Wed (Weduwee, or widow) next to his JHV makers mark (Welz mark 154). The Vos Family produced over 10 Cape Silversmiths between 1748 and 1862 (Heller, History of Cape Silver Vol 1, pg 66-71, and page 269 for a family tree). The 4 dot square punch was als...

German Silver Auricular Scroll Spoon - Hamburg, J.F. Nicolassen   
Johann Friedrich Nicolassen, Hamburg, Germany C 1816-1843

A very interesting and beautiful German silver spoon made by J. F. Nicolassen in Hamburg, Germany, circa 1820. The spoon is well made and has lovely decoration, it has a deep fig shaped bowl, connected to the stem with a rat-tail. The handle is most unusual, with irregular scrolls finely engraved with a leaf pattern, with a tight scroll at both ends. This has been termed the auricular style (resembling ear lobe or conch shell) or lobate style, it originated from German Mannerism in the early 17th century, later adopted by the famous van Vianen Dutch silversmiths (Newman, Illustrated Dictionary of Silverware, pg 28, a book we highly recommend). This style was adopted by a few 17th century German and Dutch silver spoonmakers, but these spoons are rare today (see S 1181, Dutch silver Memorial spoon and fork set, for a similar example). This spoon is a 19th century replica of this earlier style, but still we believe a rare item, we cannot recall seeing similar examples. The hallmarks are very clear, and include t...

Cape Silver Lemoen Lepels (Orange Spoons) - Pair, Jan Lotter   
Jan Lotter, Cape 1813-1817

A rare pair of Cape Silver lemoen lepels (orange spoons), with an interesting provenance, they featured in the book Cape Silver and Silversmiths by Stephan Welz, pg 93. The spoons are the traditional lemoen lepel shape, with narrow, pointed boat shaped bowl, and triangular terminal, and Cape prick engraving. The spoons have a very elegant shape, the bowls deep and curved, the drop is distinctly v shaped, they have a lovely feel in the hand. Both spoons are clearly hallmarked with makers mark IL in rectangular punch for Jan Lotter, and also are punched with initials HB, we assume the original owner. Welz describes orange spoons as"probably the most attractive type of spoon made at the Cape, derived from Dutch spoons", pg 95. He also notes that all known examples are by Cape born silversmiths of the early 19th century (so not made by the more prolific English immigrants who arrived after 1815). Jan Lotter, who died young after a short career (1813-1817), was part of the Lotter family of Cape silversmiths, he ma...

Rare Cape Silver Teaspoons (2 available) - Thomas Lock Townsend, Masonic Hallmark   
Thomas Lock Townsend, Cape C 1815

A rare pair of Cape silver teaspoons in the Fiddle pattern, with excellent hallmarks. They include the rare Masonic "Square and Compasses" symbol, the single most identifiable symbol in Freemasonry. This hallmark is very well struck on both spoons. The other hallmarks include makers mark TT for Thomas Lock Townsend (struck twice), and pseudo Georgian duty mark (Kings head) - see Welz, Cape Silver, mark 126. Thomas Lock Townsend arrived in the Cape in 1815, the first of the English silversmiths to arrive. He was followed in 1819 by his half brother John Townsend, who joined him in a brief partnership between 1824 and 1825. Thomas Lock Townsend found business difficult in the Cape, he was declared insolvent in 1819, and when he died in 1849 left insufficient estate to cover his funeral costs. Besides being registered as Goldsmith and Jeweller, he practised as mechanical dentist, lodging house keeper, and had an equipment store and fitting out warehouse (Welz, pg 141) We are selling these 2 spoons individually...

Bateman Silver Barrel Shaped Beakers (Pair) - Ducal Crest, Dalton, Draycott, Codrington   
Peter, Ann, William Bateman, London 1799

A very fine pair of Georgian silver barrel shaped beakers by the well known Bateman family; Peter, Ann and William. The beakers are patterned as half barrels, complete with individual staves and the hoops to hold them in place. This set is not intended to fit together to form a single barrel, as is sometimes the case with this form, they do not have the push-fit rim, and the crests are both aligned the same way (one crest would have been reversed if intended to fit together). The beakers are very good quality, a satisfying gauge and weight, they have a lovely feel in the hand, suitable for use (with a fine scotch whisky!). Both beakers have an interesting family crest, a dragons head above a Ducal coronet, between feathered wings, the engraving is crisp. This crest can be associated with the Dalton, Draycott and Codrington families. Peter Bateman was Hester Bateman's 2nd son, Ann Bateman was married to his brother Jonathan (who unfortunately died young in 1791), and Willam was the son of Ann and Jonathan. T...

Cape Silver Snuff Box - Daniel Beets   
Daniel Beets, Cape 1812-1828

A Cape silver snuff box by Daniel Beets, oval in shape with a three quarter hinged lid, which is well made as it is perfectly flush with the lid, and a small but practical thumbpiece. It is a pleasing design for a snuff box, has a very nice feel in the hand, easy to take in and out of a pocket. This is a fairly rare design for Cape silver snuff boxes, most were rectangular, or had a protruding hinge. This box has been well used, as can be seen from the considerable wear to the engraving, and has been repaired more than once in its lifetime. The lid has remnants of engraved wreath surrounding owners initials and date, no longer legible. The box also has 3 worn engraved stars, typically Cape in style, one either side and on the fixed portion of the lid. The interior has original gilding, a lovely golden yellow colour, quite well preserved on lid and hinge, but only some still present in base and sides, the rest has been lost during repairs. The base shows signs of repairs and splits, so has been re-attached at ...

Cape Silver Hanoverian Soup Ladle - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt   
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape C 1780

An early Cape silver Hanoverian pattern soup ladle, by Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, described as the greatest of Cape silversmiths by David Heller (History of Cape Silver). The ladle is a very pleasing gauge, very heavy to hold, and has a long drop. It also has the central Hanoverian rib on the front, and a strong turn up. The ladle is hallmarked with makers mark DHS, which is clear, but struck by a worn punch (mark 174 in Welz, described as unknown by Welz, but now known to be Schmidt's mark). Schmidt had a long career (1768-1811), his makers mark punch must have become worn over time. The second hallmark is larger and circular, but worn, probably the bunch of grapes hallmark often used by Schmidt. the third mark nearby does not appear to be a hallmark, but an imperfection in the silver.

Chinese Export Silver Tablespoon - Linchong   
Linchong, Canton, China 1800-1850

A Chinese Export silver tablespoon, in the Fiddle and Thread pattern, with pseudo hallmarks. The spoon is lovely quality, quite heavy at 88 grammes, a pleasure to hold. It has no initials or crest, and no sign of them being removed. The hallmarks are clear, and include pseudo sterling lion, crowned leopards head (with a large grin, which gives it away), date letter L used by Linchong, and pseudo Georgian duty mark. Linchong worked from New China Street, Canton, between 1800 and 1850

Chinese Export Silver Tablefork - Yatshing   
Yatshing, Canton, China 1800-1850

A rare Chinese Export silver tablefork, in the Fiddle pattern, with excellent hallmarks, they could not be better. The hallmarks include pseudo sterling lion, pseudo crowned leopard's head, makers mark "YS" and pseudo Georgian duty mark. Yatshing silver is always "of a high standard" (www.chineseexportsilver.com), this fork is no exception.

Chinese Export Silver Tablespoon - China Trade Silver, Cutshing   
Cutshing, Canton, China C 1830

A Chinese Export (or China Trade silver) silver tablespoon, with excellent pseudo hallmarks. The spoon is Fiddle pattern, and has an attractive and well engraved family crest, a Lion's head erased, which is contemporary. The hallmarks include pseudo sterling lion, pseudo crowned leopard's head, date letter "C', and pseudo Georgian duty mark. We have tentatively ascribed these marks to Cutshing, we would welcome other opinions. These marks are typical of the pseudo English marks deliberately created by Chinese silversmiths, for the export market. Cutshing are "widely recognised as producing some of the finest silver from the early China Trade period (1785-1840)" - www.chinese-export-silver.com, article on Cutshing.

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Set of 5) - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1820

A set of 5 Cape Silver tablespoons in the Fiddle pattern, with initials GHJ which are clearly engraved. The spoons have a chamfered edge (very Continental in style), and all 5 spoons have clear hallmarks (Welz mark 135). The marks include crowned leopards head, date letter a, duty mark and lion passant.

Cape Silver Lemoen Lepel and Konfyt Fork (Orange Spoon and Preserve Fork) - Pair, Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1820

A rare Cape Silver lemoen lepel (orange spoon) and matching konfyt fork (preserve), we have not encountered a matching set before, none are recorded in the Cape silver reference books. The spoon is the traditional elegant lemoen lepel shape, with narrow, pointed boat shaped bowl, v shaped drop, and triangular terminal. The matching fork has 4 tines, both feature traditional Cape prick engraving with a 4 petalled flower. Both are clearly hallmarked with makers mark IC in rectangular punch with canted corners for Johannes Combrink, and also are punched with initials IFS, we assume the original owner. Welz describes orange spoons as"probably the most attractive type of spoon made at the Cape, derived from Dutch spoons", pg 95. He also notes that all known examples are by Cape born silversmiths of the early 19th century (so not made by the more prolific English immigrants who arrived after 1815). Heller, in his book History of Cape Silver, describes orange spoons as "exquisite". Johannes Combrink of the famous Co...

Cape Silver Mustard Spoon - John Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape 1824-1841

A rare Cape silver mustard spoon, in the Fiddle pattern with gilded bowl, and excellent hallmarks. This is a lovely, well made spoon, with a marked angle at the drop, and pleasing proportions. The hallmarks include makers mark JT in damaged punch (Welz mark 123), and 4 pseudo marks (Georgian duty, lion passant, date letter a and tree mark). Heller does record Cape made salt and mustard spoons, and depicts 6 salt spoons in his book "History of Cape Silver" (pg 202, plate 67). Cape mustard spoons appear to be be much rarer than salt spoons, this is the only known example we have encountered.

George II shellback marrow spoon   
Edward Bennett, London 1735

Extremely rare marrow spoon (as opposed to the commomer marrow scoops), with a lovely shellback. Hallmarks are very distinct. Bennett was a well regarded silversmith who worked on London Bridge.

Irish Provincial Silver Toddy Ladle - Cork   
Phineas Garde, Cork with Dublin hallmarks 1819

A rare Irish provincial silver toddy ladle made in Cork, but hallmarked in Dublin. The ladle is circular with a lip for pouring, and has a whale bone handle. The ladle is beautifully decorated, with embossed flowers, leaves and scrolls, on a stippled background. The pouring lip is decorated with a "sunburst" collar. The decoration is typical of the Irish silver of the 1820 period, with floral repousse (embossing) on a background stippled to a matt finish (Bennett, Collecting Irish Silver, pg 79). The whalebone handle is 4 sided, and has an unusual knop end, the circular knob set above silver banded decoration. The hallmarks are all very clear, including makers mark PG in oval outline (Cork mark no. 80 in Bennett). The Dublin Goldsmiths company passed an act in 1807 requiring the Kings head to be stamped on all plate made in Ireland. As this could only be done in Dublin, it forced the provincial goldsmiths to start sending silver to Dublin for hallmarking. Garde, who worked in Cork between 1812 and 1845, appe...

Scottish Georgian Silver Punch Ladle - Robert Gray & Sons   
Robert Gray & Sons, Glasgow 1825

A magnificent Scottish Georgian silver punch ladle, by one of the finest Scottish silversmiths of the period. The ladle has a circular bowl, finely decorated with bunches of grapes and vine leaves, the decoration is truly a work of art. The ladle has a lip which is also decorated, similar to a gadroon pattern. The handle is held in place with a traditional heart shaped plaque, this has a previous owners initials lightly scratched into it, hardly visible but a nice addition. The silver handle is also decorated with grapes and vine leaf. The original handle is wood, which has been turned into an attractive shape. The ladle is finished with a silver knob and cap, also decorated in the same fine grape and vine pattern. The ladle is a generous size and weight, is very good quality, and is in superb condition. The hallmarks are very slightly worn but still clearly visible, and include the Glasgow town mark, lion rampant, date letter G, duty mark and makers mark RG&S. Robert Gray worked in Glasgow from 1776, adding ...

Cape Silver Konfyt Forks (Pair) - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1814-1853

A pair of Cape silver Fiddle pattern konfyt (preserve) forks, with 4 tines, by Johannes Combrink. Both forks have excellent hallmarks, maker mark IC between 2 devices (possibly pomegranite?), see Cape Silver by Welz, mark 27, pg 147 - although on these forks the device has been reversed, with ball on inside, showing Cape silversmiths were not too concerned how hallmarks were struck. Johnannes Combrink worked between 1814 and 1853, he was a fine silversmith who produced good quality work.

Cape Silver Teaspoon - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853

A Cape silver teaspoon, in the Fiddle pattern, by Johannes Combrink. The spoon has original owners initials HV engraved on the stem, the engraving is most attractive. The teaspoon has an unusual drop with incised curve. The spoon is marked with makers mark IC (Welz mark 30, Cape Silver, pg 147), this is very well struck and clear. Note faint scratch mark JER near hallmark, we presume a previous owner, visible in photo, not really visible normally unless you look close in good light.

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Lawrence Twentyman, Rare Hallmarks   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape 1818-1832

A Cape silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, with a set of extremely rare Cape silver hallmarks. The hallmarks include makers mark LT, and pseudo marks that include date letter A, lyre and duty mark. These marks are shown by Welz in his book Cape Silver (mark 144, page 156), they are also shown by David Heller in his book History of Cape Silver (mark MM84, page 156). The makers mark, A and lyre mark are well struck and very clear, the duty mark is worn at the top. The date letter A is quite distinctive, with one arm much thicker than the other.

Cape Silver Kings Pattern Dessert Forks (Pair) - Waldek   
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1836

A pair of Cape silver dessert forks in the Kings pattern, by Fredrik Waldek. The forks are very good quality and gauge, but a little shorter than usual. The forks are double struck (pattern on both sides), and have the diamond heel, as is usual with Cape silver Kings pattern. Cape silver in Kings pattern is quite rare, it was only produced by 2 silversmiths, Twentyman and Waldek, who took over Twentyman's business. The hallmarks are very clear on both forks, and include pseudo Georgian duty, date letter a and crowned leopard's head, along with makers mark FW, which is slightly worn. The forks have no monograms or engraving, and none has been removed. Waldek had a long career as a Cape silversmith, chronometer, clockmaker and jeweller, he worked between 1830 and 1877. He took over Twentyman's shop and partnership on Heerengracht in 1836. The forks have shorter stems than other examples, see S 1866 for a comparative example.

Cape Silver Kings Pattern Dessert Forks (Two) - Twentyman & Waldek   
Lawrence Twentyman, Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1836

A set of 2 Cape silver dessert forks in the Kings pattern, one by Lawrence Twentyman and the other by Fredrik Waldek. These forks match S 1864 and S 1865, we have put these 2 together to show an unusual variance in length. Whilst both are Cape Kings pattern dessert forks, they have a 1.2 cm difference in length (the shorter fork is also lighter, 54 vs 62 grammes). The difference is the stem only, the decoration top and bottom is identical, as are the length of tines. It is believed that Twentyman imported dies for Kings pattern to the Cape circa 1830 and that Waldek took over the dies in 1836, but we cannot explain the difference in length, all suggestions welcome. We have carefully studied the forks, there is no evidence they have been lengthened or shortened. The forks are double struck (pattern on both sides), and have the diamond heel, as is usual with Cape silver Kings pattern. Cape silver in Kings pattern is quite rare, it was only produced by these 2 silversmiths, Twentyman and Waldek, who took over T...

Cape Silver Kings Pattern Dessert Forks (Pair) - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape 1818-1832

A pair of Cape silver dessert forks in the Kings pattern, by Lawrence Twentyman. The forks are very good quality and gauge, a pleasure to hold. The forks are double struck (pattern on both sides), and have the diamond heel, as is usual with Cape silver Kings pattern. Cape silver in Kings pattern is quite rare, it was only produced by 2 silversmiths, Twentyman and Waldek, who took over Twentymans business. The hallmarks are very clear on both forks, and include pseudo lion passant, Georgian duty, date letter a and crowned leopard's head, along with makers mark LT. The forks have no monograms or engraving, and none has been removed.

Early Georgian Silver Punch Ladle - Whalebone Handle   
Edward Aldridge, London 1746

A lovely and early George II double lipped punch ladle, with twisted whalebone handle, of extremely good quality. It is a good gauge and weight, much heavier than many we have seen. The bowl is fluted and is a generous size, and is joined to the handle with a double scroll. The base of the ladle is engraved "G over J+E", the engraving is contemporary and done by hand. The hallmarks are clear, and include the unregistered makers mark EA (Grimwade 3534) with 2 dots above and 1 below. Whalebone was heated under pressure with steam until malleable, and then twisted into ornate spirals, which hardened and retained their design after cooling (Helliwell, Collecting Small Silverware, pg 76). Aldridge worked between 1724 and 1765 in Foster Lane. He was tried at the investigation of the Goldsmith's Company for counterfeiting marks in 1742, but was acquitted by the jury (Grimwade pg 421).

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