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Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johannes Casparus Lotter   
Johannes Casparus Lotter, Cape 1811-1823
$ 290.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Old English pattern, with 3 tines. The fork has engraved original owners initials MMR, quite quaintly engraved, possibly by an amateur. The makers mark is very well struck and very clear, makers initials ICL between 2 floral devices with 7 petals (Welz mark 78, page 150). Lotter worked at the Cape between 1811 and his death in 1823, he shared a name with his father Johannes Casparus Lotter, who was also a silversmith (12 members of the Lotter family practised as silversmiths).

Danish Silver Martele Tablespoons (Pair) and Cheese Knife
Copenhagen 1925, 1927
$ 310.00

A pair of Arts & Crafts Danish silver tablespoons, in a modernist Georg Jensen style Martele pattern, with matching cheese knife. The pattern is planished, or hand hammered, (Martele is French for hammer, Gorham uses the Martele brand for its hand hammered range), this creates an uneven surface which reflects the light, so a very pleasing pattern. The pattern also has balls and scrolls. The spoons are hand hammered on the front side of the handle only, but the bowls are planished on both sides. The spoons have original owners initials CC engraved on the back, the knife has no engraving. All 3 items have 2 clear hallmarks, the Danish 3 tower silver guarantee mark for 826/1000 grade, with date letters (the spoons are 1925 and the knife is 1927). They also have assay masters mark CFH for Christian F. Heise, who worked between 1904 and 1932.

Cape Silver Tableforks (Set of 5) - Willem Lotter
Willem Godfried Lotter, Cape 1810-1835
$ 780.00

A set of 5 Fiddle pattern Cape silver tableforks, made by Willem Lotter. The forks are quite long and elegant, with bevelled edges, quite attractive and pleasing quality. All 5 forks are struck with makers mark WGL in irregular punch between 2 oval devices (Welz mark 88). Welz depicts this mark as a face, we are not convinced, this requires further research. Willem Gotfried Lotter worked between 1810 and 1835, his father (also Willem Gotfried) was also a silversmith, they shared the same punches. Lotter died in Richmond, which was established as a spa town for sufferers of tuberculosis.

Victorian Silver Grape Scissors - Aston & Son
Aston & Son, Birmingham 1857
$ 560.00

A pair of Victorian silver grape scissors, with attractive handle design of symmetrical scrolls and loops. The set is very finely engraved (on the front side only) with a foliage pattern, very intricate, in typical Victorian fashion. The blades are the traditional grape scissor design, with one blade thicker with right angle to accommodate the other blade. The hinge has a silver cover, also engraved, the pin is silver as well. The hallmarks are clear but hidden by the engraving, both arms are hallmarked, including makers mark A&S for Aston and Son of Regent place, Birmingham, Thomas and William Aston ran the business between 1856 and 1861. Henry Aston (we assume another son) took over the business in 1862, it was still operating in 1930 as wedding ring manufacturers (Culme, Gold and Silversmiths, page 18).

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Oltman Ahlers
Oltman Ahlers, Cape 1810-1827
$ 310.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Old English pattern, with 3 tines. The fork is hallmarked with makers mark OA in oval punch, this is faintly struck but still visible, between two square devices with 4 dots, these are both clearly struck ( Welz mark 2). Ahlers worked as a silversmith between 1810 and his death in 1827. He married the widow of silversmith Jan Brevis, which may have facilitated his entry into the trade. He was the son of Oltman Alders of Germany, his mother was Dorothea of Bengal, who presumably arrived in the Cape as a slave. His silver is quite scarce.

Rare Military Shell Pattern Flatware (3 Tableforks, 3 Dessertspoons) - Old English Military Thread & Shell
Chawner & Co, London 1870
$ 1 150.00

A rare set of Old English Military Thread and Shell pattern (also called Military Shell) tableforks and dessertspoons (3 of each). These are good quality, the forks around 90 grammes each and the spoons over 60. All 6 have an engraved family crest, a raised lion facing right between 2 horns. The pattern has the regular Thread and Shell pattern, double struck (on both sides), but with scrolls instead of shoulders, as with all Military variants (Pickford, Silver Flatware, page 117). Pickford describes this pattern as "a rare pattern illustrated in the Chawner & Co Pattern book, Appendix page 218", where the Chawner book shows this pattern, termed as "Military Shell". Pickford did not illustrate a photographic example of this pattern , a further indication of its rarity. The hallmarks on all 6 items are very clear, makers mark GA for George Adams of Chawner & Co, and London date letter P for 1870. In addition, all pieces carry additional journeyman's marks (Y, K, 3 petal flower, O), so the particular silversmit...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Marthinus Lourens Smith
Marthinus Lourens Smith, Cape C 1800
$ 390.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Fiddle pattern, with 3 tines. The fork has the original owners initials PJS, quite quaintly engraved in Colonial style.The fork has excellent hallmarks, they could not be better. They include makers mark MLS and the leaf device, with the veins clearly visible (Welz mark 117). Smith was a Dane who arrived in the Cape as a VOC employee in 1757 aged 35, he died in 1806. He led an interesting life, he married 4 times, and had 10 children.

Private Die Silver Dessert Fork - Watson Family Crest
Elkington & Company, London 1898
$ 330.00

A private die silver Victorian dessert fork, made by Elkington & Co in 1898. The fork is an excellent gauge, over 60 grammes, a good quality fork. It is double struck with a variant of Kings pattern, but with an ornate scrolling design below the raised family crest. The crest is a griffin holding a branch with leaves in its beak, described as "Griffin's head erased argent holding in the baek a sprig or rose branch proper", this is the Watson family crest. This branch of the Watson family came from Silsden, Yorkshire, descendants of Rowland Watson, Silsden Moor late 16th century. The hallmarks are very clear. Private die flatware was individually commissioned with the family crest die-stamped rather than engraved on a stock pattern (Pickford, Silver Flatware, page 173. Most 19th century private die patterns were supplied through Hunt & Roskell to members of the peerage and other wealthy clients. Pickford describes these as "fascinating, but obviously impossible to build into services". Note - this fork is acco...

Canadian Silver Tableforks (Pair) - Peter Bohle, Montreal, Quebec
Peter Bohle, Montreal, Quebec 1807-1853
$ 390.00

A pair of Canadian silver tableforks in the Fiddle pattern, with original owners script initials EB engraved on the back of the forks. The hallmarks on both forks are clear, and include pseudo lion passant (with a very thin body), pseudo oval Georgian duty mark, and makers mark PB for Peter Bohle. The lion passant is struck upside down on both forks, indicating the striking of marks was rather haphazard. Peter Bohle (1786 -1865) was the son of silversmith David Bohle, both his brothers (David & Francis) were also silversmiths. Peter was apprenticed to leading Canadian silversmith Robert Cruikshank for 7 years between 1800 and 1807, but spent his career working in Montreal, Quebec. He is known to have manufactured for the trade (sold to Savage & Lyman), he also partnered with Robert Hendery between 1853 and 1856 (Canadian Silversmiths 1700-1900, John Langdon, page 50). The family were German immigrants from Hanau (known for its silver industry).

18th Century Dutch Silver Hanoverian 3 Pronged Forks - Hendrik Kamerlingh II
Hendrik Kamerlingh II, Amsterdam C 1730-1740
$ 660.00

A lovely set of 5 18th century Dutch silver Hanoverian pattern 3 pronged forks, with a matching 6th fork made slightly later by another maker, we assume to replace a loss shortly after they were made. The forks are quite plain and elegant, with turn down ends, and a prominent drop and pip, the "Amsterdam Lofje", characteristic of spoons and forks from Amsterdam. The forks have no engraving or monograms. All the forks have makers mark HK in script for Hendrik Kamerlingh II, who worked between 1730 and 1776, and Amsterdam town mark (crown above 3 crosses). The 6th fork has makers mark HO for Hendrik Overhulsman, who worked between 1790 and 1811, also with Amsterdam town mark. All 6 makers and town marks are slightly squashed, this is usual on 18th century bottom marked flatware as the spoon maker would have re-hammered the stems after return from the assay office, as the stem would bulge when the marks were struck. All 6 forks have an additional hallmark, V in shield under a crown, this is a Dutch tax mark used...

Silver 2 Pronged Notched Puritan Fork - Replica of Manners Fork, 1632
Francis Howard, Sheffield 1970
$ 250.00

An interesting 17th century style silver notched 2 pronged fork, a replica of the earliest known English table fork. The fork has 3 notches at the top of the stem, a rare feature seen occasionally on puritan spoons. The original, made in 1632, is known as the Manners Fork, and is in the V&A museum in London. The original belonged to the Rutland family of Haddon Hall, and has the crest of John Manners, 8th Earl of Rutland. This fork is a good gauge, very pleasing to use, we tested it on cold meats and olives! The hallmarks are excellent, and include makers mark FH for Francis Howard, the firm worked between 1900 and 1986. The fork comes in it's original box, with label "V.K. Chapman, Jeweller & Silversmith, 104 South St, St. Andrews", A real talking point for your dinner table. This fork is identical to S 1568 which we have already sold, made 2 years later.

Cape Silver Tablespoon and Tablefork Set (8, 4 of each) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 1 250.00

A set of 8 Cape Silver tablespoons and table forks (4 of each) in the Old English pattern, all with original owners engraved initials JM in script. The forks are lovely, long and elegant, and in great condition, the spoons have seen more use, with wear to the bowls. The spoons have wide circular drops, more continental in style. Six pieces (4 spoons and 2 forks) have additional initials AFDT engraved on the back of the stems, we assume an earlier owner, the AFDT showing signs of wear. Seven items have excellent hallmarks (makers mark IC and crude anchor, Welz mark 25), one fork has different marks, makers mark IC struck with a worn punch (Welz mark 29) and what appears to be crowned leopards head (clearly struck but worn punch, outline clear but no detail). Combrink had a long career, and this IC mark with worn punch is well known, it is assumed the punch became worn over time. The crowned leopard town mark is more of a mystery, this punch was used by Twentyman and Waldek (Welz 135 and 163), and is unknown by...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork -Johan Anton Bunning   
Johan Anton Bunning?, Cape C 1800
$ 350.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Fiddle pattern, with 3 tines. The tines are different from most konfyt forks, these are quite fat, widely spaced and short (3.3. cm). The fork has original owners initials TFM, the engraving in an unusual script, quite pleasing overall. The fork has makers mark I.B in oval punch, with the I and B co-joined. This is depicted in the book "Cape Silver and Silversmiths" by Stephan Welz as mark 20, page 146, for Johan Anton Bunning, a German soldier who arrived in the Cape in 1758 and died in 1793. He mark is confirmed as he made silver for the Dutch Reformed Church, whose records confirm him as maker, but the Fiddle pattern style of the fork is problematic, as it was only introduced circa 1800, so it is unlikely he made this fork. A number of alternatives exist, it could have been made by a son (Cape silversmiths regularly carried on using punches created by fathers). More likely is that this is the mark of another Cape silversmith, whose mark has not yet been attributed. IB or JB...

Nursery Rhyme Silver Christening Spoon and Baby Pusher - Little Boy Blue & Jack and Jill
W.H. Collins & Co., Birmingham 1932 and 1936
$ 400.00

A matching pair of nursery rhyme silver baby implements, a spoon and baby pusher, intended as Christening gifts. Both have short handles, the spoon with Jack and Jill picture, the pusher with Little Boy Blue. The detail on both is lovely, as can be seen from the photographs. Both are clearly hallmarked, the spoon was made in 1932, the pusher in 1936, but both by the same maker WH Collins, and both part of their nursery rhyme collection. The pusher has original owners initials MJ, lightly engraved so this could be removed. The pusher also has a registration number, indicating the design was protected.

Wallace Georgian Colonial Sterling 1932 Tableforks (Set of 12) and Salad Forks (Set of 6)
Wallace Silversmiths, Connecticut 1932-1965
$ 1 200.00

A set of 18 Wallace Georgian Colonial pattern sterling silver forks, 12 are table forks and 6 are salad forks, which are very suitable for use as cake forks. The forks have 4 prongs, and the pattern is quite elegant but restrained. The design of the forks is different front and back, the front a shaped pedestal, the back a lovely foliage design. All 18 forks are hallmarked "WALLACE STERLING with stags head, and PAT.AP'LD FOR", standing for patent applied for. Wallace Silversmiths dates back to 1835, and is still in existence today, this pattern was made from 1932 to 1965. The forks have no monogrammes.

Georg Jensen Sterling Silver Cypress Pattern Flatware Set (24 pieces)
Georg Jensen, Copenhagen 1960
$ 2 200.00

A 24 piece set of Georg Jensen sterling silver Cypress pattern flatware, consisting of 6 dinner knives, 6 dinner forks, 6 dinner spoons and 6 soup spoons. This set has a lovely elegant design, we particularly love the soup spoons. The spoons and forks are all sterling silver, the knives have stainless steel blades, also engraved "GEORG JENSEN DENMARK", and the usual hollow silver handles, the knives are serrated on one side and have an indent at the top of the blade. This is a vintage set dating from 1960, all 24 pieces are fully hallmarked. The hallmarks include "GEORG JENSEN" in oval dots, above "STERLING DENMARK". All 24 pieces also carry London import marks, sponsors mark G.JLd for Georg Jensen (their London branch), oval U import mark, .925 sterling mark and date letters e and f for 1960 and 1961. The Cypress (or Cypres) pattern is #99 in the Jensen catalog, it was designed by Tias Eckhoff in 1954. Tias Eckhoff, a Norwegian, has been described as one of Norway's most versatile designers. Note: - we also...

Dutch Silver Cakeforks (Set of 12) - Nederlandse Zilver Taartvorkjes
Gerritsen & Van Kempen, Zeist C 1924-1960
$ 370.00

A set of 12 Dutch silver cake forks, with a threaded border pattern, with the traditional thicker cake cutting tine. The forks are quite dainty, but still good quality, around 18 grammes each. All 12 forks are hallmarked with makers mark V.K. in horseshoe (or capital G), and the Dutch dagger used for small items of silver. Koninklijke Gerritsen & Van Kempen were based in the Dutch town of Zeist between 1924 and 1960, when they merged with Van Kempen & Begeer. Their head designer between 1934 and 1977 was Gustav Beran, a pupil of Josef Hoffman in Vienna (Art Nouveau & Art Deco Silver, Krekel-Aalberse, page 254).

Victorian Silver Grape Scissors - Charles Boyton
Charles Boyton, London 1878
$ 800.00

A pair of Victorian silver grape scissors, once an essential implement in an upmarket Victorian drawing room, used to cut the stems of a bunch of grapes. This is the rarer type, with traditional scissor blades, as opposed to the more usual 2 wide flat faced blades with a 90 degree angle on one blade, sometimes called grape shears. This set is long and elegant, with a beaded border, and engraved leaf decoration on the back and front, and 2 vacant cartouche's for family crest or initials. The handles are oval rings, and the original steel hinge pin has an attractive circular silver cap with a floral design. The hallmarks are clear, and include makers mark CB on both arms, with date letter C for 1878, London town mark, sterling lion and Victoria duty mark. Charles Boyton & Sons was founded in 1809, and survived until 1933. They were manufacturing silversmiths, they supplied many prestigious retailers locally and internationally. A very similar example is depicted in the book "Millers Silver Buying Guide by Danie...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johann Voigt
Johann Voigt (Possibly), Cape C 1791
$ 350.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork, in the Old English pattern with feather edge decoration and 3 tines, dating it around 1790 to 1800. The fork is struck with a makers mark only, i:V:G in an unusual shaped punch, which moulds around the dotted i. This fork matches S 1787, the main difference being longer tines (we believe original, these have not been shortened) and a makers mark that is good but not as clearly struck as the other. Welz describes this maker as unknown, but Heller (History of Cape Silver Vol I, pg 163) lists this maker as Johann Voigt? Both authors depict a different IVG punch from this one, with an additional fish hallmark (see our tablespoon S 1571 by the same maker to see the different punch and fish hallmark). Overall we agree with Welz and are not convinced by the attribution to Voigt, it seems far more likely to belong to a "van G" maker (for example van Graan, a known Cape name). Overall an interesting hallmark that requires further research. Note - a matching konfyt fork by the same maker is a...

Colonial Silver Spoon and Fork (Christening set) - Madagascar
I*D, Madagascar C 1850
$ 540.00

Colonial silver child's fork and spoon, probably a Christening gift. It is very crudely made, and the pattern is a mix between Old English and Fiddle, more Continental than English, particularly the rounded shape of the drop . The set is finely engraved with the initials GPJ in elaborate script, and Madagascar. The hallmarks are clear, and consist of the makers mark I*D struck 3 times, in an irregular outline, so the punch was probably also handmade. One mystery is the combination of very crudely made flatware, made by an amateur in possibly difficult conditions, with the fine engraving - so possibly added later. We welcome thoughts on their origin or identification of the I*D makers mark.

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