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Irish Silver
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Irish Silver sugar tongs - Georgian   
William Cummins, Dublin 1814

Georgian Irish Fiddle pattern sugar tongs, with very clear hallmarks. They also have the original owners initials (W over CW) scratch engraved in 18th century style (not script). Cummins worked from 1813 to 1846, so these tongs were made very early in his career. He worked from 31 Exchequer Street, and his name was also recorded as Cumying.

Antique Irish Silver Harp Brooch   
H&H, Dublin 1908

A lovely antique Irish silver brooch in the form of the Irish harp. The harp is decorated with traditional Celtic motifs, in the traditional manner. The hallmarks are clear, except Hibernia who is only partially visible.

Irish Silver Teaspoon set (6)   
John Smyth, Dublin 1873

Set of six Irish teaspoons, with an interesting falcon crest, in the Fiddle pattern. These spoons are larger than many other teaspoons (slightly longer and heavier). The hallmarks are very clear on all spoons.

Irish Silver Bright Cut Celtic Point Tablespoon - John Shiels, Dublin Star
John Shiels, Dublin 1786
$ 190.00

A lovely Irish silver Bright Cut Celtic Point tablespoon, with traditional Dublin Star cut on the terminal. The spoon has an oval cartouche, with engraved family crest of a Griffin holding branch with leaves, this is crisp and clear. The spoon is bottom marked, and unusually has excellent hallmarks (bottom marked hallmarks are oftern squashed), they could not be better. The include Dublin Hibernia and Harp Crowned, date letter O for 1786, and makers mark J.S for John Shiels (or Sheils) who worked between 1762 and 1790.

Irish Victorian Silver Sugar Tongs - Philip Weekes
Philip Weekes, Dublin 1844
$ 200.00

A pair of antique Irish silver sugar tongs in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved initials MMG. The tongs are a good weight and in excellent condition. The hallmarks are very clear, they could not be better. Philip Weekes worked between 1816 and 1848, he was apprenticed to Samuel Neville. The makers mark has a dot between the letters, this mark does not appear in Irish Silver by Bennett.

Antique Irish Silver Mustard & Salt Spoons (Mixed group of 6)
Dublin 1829, 1832, 1837, 1867, 1925
$ 220.00

A mixed set of 6 Irish sterling silver spoons, 2 large mustard spoons, 2 smaller mustard spoons, and 2 small saltspoons (the last 2 a matching pair). The matching salt spoons are Dublin 1925 by Wakely & Wheeler, the 2 smaller mustard are by William Cummins (1829) and Samuel Neville (1832), the 2 larger mustard spoons are Christopher Cummins (1837) and JS (1867). 1 Spoon has a family crest, 2 have engraved initials and 3 are unengraved. All the hallmarks are clear.

Irish Silver meat skewer   
Samuel Neville, Dublin 1805

Plain Irish meat skewer with flat blade, and shoulder pattern beneath ring. The hallmarks are very clear, note the lack of a duty mark, as duty was only introduced on Irish silver in 1808. Initials VG. Neville was an extremely well regarded Dublin silversmith, who served as Warden and Master of the Goldsmith's Company. He was elected to the Dublin City Council in 1807.

Irish Georgian Silver Tablespoon - Christopher Skinner
Christopher Skinner, Dublin 1765
$ 220.00

A Irish Georgian silver tablespoon, in the Old English pattern, with original owners engraved initials PRM. The spoon has a lovely feel, full of character, with quite a large bowl. The hallmarks are bottom marked, and very clear, they could not be better. They include Dublin Hibernia, Crowned Harp, date letter R for 1765 and makers mark C.S in diamond punch, with star above and below, very distinctive. Skinner worked between 1739 and 1765, so this spoon was made right at the end of his career. He was a highly respected silversmith, he was elected Warden in 1751, Master in 1754 and in 1755 was elected to the Dublin City Common Council (Bennett, Collecting Irish Silver, page 153).

Irish Provincial Silver Bright Cut Celtic Point Tablespoon - Joseph Kinselagh, Cork
Joseph Kinselagh, Cork with Dublin hallmarks 1804
$ 220.00

An Irish Provincial silver Bright Cut Celtic Point tablespoon, made in Cork and hallmarked in Dublin in 1804. The spoon is quite large, over 23 cm, and has intricate bright cut engraving, the quality is excellent. The spoon has engraved family crest of a Boar's head, this too is beautifully engraved, and very crisp and clear. The hallmarks are clear, Dublin hallmarks for 1804, and JK in script makers mark for Joseph Kinselagh of Cork, he worked between 1802 and 1807, he may have been a descendant of earlier silversmith of same name, 1750-1783, perhaps the makers mark was passed down the family. More research is required on this maker.

Irish Georgian Silver Bright Cut Sugar Tongs   
John Daly, Dublin 1786-1809

A beautiful Irish Georgian silver sugar tongs, with bright cut engraving, Irish "Star" and shell style bowl. The tongs also have a well engraved Lions head family crest in one of the cartouches on the side. No initials are engraved on the bow. The tongs are very good quality, as you would expect from Irish Georgian silver. The tongs have 3 hallmarks, crowned harp for Dublin in rectangular punch with cut corners (used 1793-1809), makers mark JD in script in oval punch, and Hibernian duty mark. No date letter is present, as is usual on Georgian silver tongs (Hodges, Georgian Silver Sugar Tongs, pg 198). John Daly worked between 1786 and 1809, from the style of the tongs we place them circa 1795. Irish tongs by Daly are probably rare, as they were not recorded by Hodges in the book described above.

Irish Silver Torque   
Padraig O’Mathuna, Dublin 1972

A lovely Irish silver torque, hand crafted with clearly visible hand hammered marks. This is a neck torque (as opposed to a bangle torque intended for a wrist). Torques are a traditional Celtic design. Padraig O'Mathuna worked from the lovely town of Cashel in Tipperary. Cashel is the traditional seat of the Kings of Munster.

Irish Georgian Silver Sauce Ladle - John Power, Dublin, Bassett Family Crest
John Power, Dublin 1793
$ 250.00

An Irish antique silver sauce ladle, in the Celtic pointed pattern, also called Pointed Old English. The ladle has a beautiful original engraved family crest of a stag's head with a cross between the antlers, the detail is good with no wear. This we believe is the family crest of the Bassett family, described as "A Stag's Head Caboshed, And Between The Attires A Cross Patt Fitch Arg" - source (www.myfamilysilver.com). The hallmarks are excellent, they could not be clearer, including makers mark JP for John Power. Pickford, in his book "Silver Flatware", states that most Irish flatware of this period is this Celtic Pointed variant, which is only found in Ireland and Scotland.

Irish Georgian Silver Bright Cut Bow Tablespoons (Pair)   
John Dalrymple, Dublin 1794

A pair of Irish Georgian silver tablespoons, with bright cut "Dublin Bow" engraving. The oval shield under the star is engraved with original owners initials CFS and AJS, possibly a husband and wife. This engraving was popular in Ireland between 1790 and 1800, the bright cut glitters in candlelight, the Bow pattern is much rarer than the Dublin Star pattern, the Star, Bow and Prince of Wales Feathers (unique to Limerick) are unique to Irish silver. The spoons have extended drops, and the hallmarks are very clear on both spoons. These include date letter X for 1794, Harp Crowned and Hiburnia in rectangular punch (first introduced in 1794), and makers mark I.D in oval punch for John Dalrymple, who worked between 1789 and 1794 (www.silvermakersmarks.co.uk). John Dalrymple is a rare makers mark, he was not featured in the book "Collecting Irish Silver" by Douglas Bennett, who wrote the definitive guides on Irish silver.

Irish Georgian Silver Bright Cut Silver Sugar Tongs - Dublin Bow, Benjamin Tait
Benjamin Taitt, Dublin 1784-1791
$ 250.00

An Irish Georgian silver pair of sugartongs, decorated in bright cut engraving, and featuring the rare "Dublin Bow" engraved on both arms. The tongs are lovely quality and a good weight, they have shell grips, concave arms, and are slightly longer and heavier than their English counterparts (See Hodges, Georgian Silver Sugar Tongs, page 197, where he also states that Irish tongs of this period are beautifully made, with distinctive bright cut engraving, commanding prices 2 to 3 times more than English equivalents). The tongs are engraved with original owners initials ER in script. Bright cut engraving was popular in Ireland between 1790 and 1800, the bright cut glitters in candlelight, the Bow pattern is much rarer than the Dublin Star pattern, the Star, Bow and Prince of Wales Feathers (unique to Limerick) are unique to Irish silver. The hallmarks are clear, under the bow, makers mark BT in serrated punch for Taitt who worked between 1784 and 1791, and Irish harp and Hibernia in rounded punch used before 17...

Gleninsheen Collar Irish Silver Caddy Spoon   
Thomas O'Connor & Sons, Dublin 1973

A commemorative Irish silver caddy spoon, with the Gleninsheen collar handle and rounded square bowl, made to commemorate Ireland's entry into the E.E.C (European Economic Community). The original Gleninsheen collar is a gorget or neck ornament made from a sheet of pure gold, dating back to approximately 700 BC, it was dicovered by a farmer in 1932 in County Clare near the Gleninsheen wedge tombs, it is now in the National Museum. The collar has also featured on Irish stamps, and has been included in the book "The History of Ireland in 100 Objects" (which we can recommend). The caddy spoon also has the Gleninsheen Collar hallmark, which was only used in 1973. All the hallmarks are are well struck and very clear with no wear. An identical spoon was also part of the John Norie collection (lot 7, Part 1 of John Norie Collection of Caddy Spoons, Woolley & Wallis, April 2004). This spoon also features in the Pearson Silver Collection of post war British silver (www.pearsoncollection.com). Note - This spoon was als...

Irish Georgian Silver Dessert Spoons (Set of 4) -
John Kavanagh, John Kelly, James Kennedy, Dublin 1787
$ 300.00

A set of 4 Irish Georgian dessert spoons, bottom marked, with excellent hallmarks on all 4 spoons. The spoons are Old English pattern, and have an engraved family crest of an armoured arm holding a dagger, this engraving is crisp and clear. Bottom marked hallmarks, used before 1790, are seldom clear, they are often squashed, these marks are excellent. They include makers mark IK in rectangular punch with rounded corners, and without dot, according to Douglas Bennett, in his book Collecting Irish Silver, this mark could belong to 3 different silversmiths, John Kavanagh (1783-1819), John Kelly (1780-1794) or James Kennedy (1768-1803), all three of which fall in the date range. More research is required on these makers, the makers mark on these spoons are very clear.

Irish Georgian Silver Serving Spoons (Pair) - William Ward, Dublin   
William Ward, Dublin 1805

A pair of Georgian Irish silver serving spoons, made by William Ward of Dublin. The spoons are Fiddle pattern, we have described them as serving spoons as they are noticeably larger than tablespoons, very suitable for use as serving spoons. The spoons both have an interesting engraved family crest, a hand above heart, this is well engraved. The hallmarks are clear on both spoons, makers mark W.W (mark 580 in Irish Silver by Douglas Bennett, page 180), date letter I for 1805, and Hibernia and Harp Crowned in rectangular punches with canted corners. Note the absence of a duty mark, which only came into use in 1807 in Ireland. William Ward was a noted spoonmaker, he was freed in 1774 and died in 1822.

Irish Georgian Silver Punch Ladle (Small) - John Townsend - Unrecorded Makers Mark   
John Townsend, Dublin 1831-1832

An Irish Georgian silver punch ladle, quite small in size, identical in form to the larger punch ladles, we are not sure if it is intended for punch or another liquid (bowl very similar in size to Scottish toddy ladles, so perhaps an Irish Whiskey toddy ladle?). The bowl is circular, with a substantial pouring lip, and angled handle, the turned wooden handle is stained black. The wooden handle is securely fastened with silver pin, we believe this to be original, with no repairs. The interior of the bowl has 3 hallmarks, makers mark J.T in rectangular punch, partially struck (due to curved surface) harp crowned for Dublin, and clearly struck duty mark for William IV, the punch with 4 indents, this punch was only used in 1831 and 1832. This particular makers mark is interesting, J.T in rectangular punch, it is not recorded by Bennett in his book "Collecting Irish Silver (highly recommended), it is recorded by Jackson (page 655) preserved on a pewter plate, but listed as unknown. Amongst the most likely candidat...

Irish Silver Soup Ladle   
Richard Sawyer, Dublin 1812

A lovely Irish soup ladle in the Fiddle pattern, with an attractive, naive tulip crest. The handle is beautifully curved, so much that the top of the handle is at right angles to the bowl, which makes holding this ladle a pleasure. The bowl, which is quite large, is shaped with high edges which assists pouring the soup out of the ladle. The hallmarks are very clear. Sawyer worked from Fishamble Street from 1797 - 1812, when he died - meaning this ladle was one of his last works.

Irish Celtic Point Bright Cut Star Silver Teaspoons (Set of 6) - Dublin Star Cut Silver   
Various - Shiels, Murphy, Bayly, Dublin C 1790-1800

A set of 6 Irish Georgian silver Celtic Point teaspoons, with bright cut "Dublin Star" engraving. The oval shield under the star is vacant, this was originally intended for a family crest or owners initials. This engraving was popular in Ireland between 1790 and 1800, the bright cut glitters in candlelight, the Star pattern is unique to Irish silver. The 6 spoons were made by 4 different makers, and have very slight differences, but the hand engraving was done by the same hand, so we believe the set was assembled by the engraver. All 6 spoons are hallmarked with the Dublin Hibernia and Harp Crowned, no date letters are present (as is usual with Irish teaspoons of this period). 4 Makers marks can be identified, 2 J.S for John Shiels (1762-1790), one AM for Arthur Murphy, and one JB for John Bayly, the fifth mark is ?D, the last is not legible. Slight differences includethe shapes of the drops, and the bowl shapes, some move oval than others (very slight differences).

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