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Scottish Silver
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Scottish Silver Box - Archers Hall.   
Brook & Son, Edinburgh 1902

A lovely commemorative Scottish silver box, beautifully engraved on the lid with 3 different armorials. The sides of the box are decorated with an attractive flower, leaf and bow design, and the interior is silver gilt. The inscription reads "From Friends at Archers Hall to Charles Stewart, Match Secretary, 1891-1901, 22nd October 1901." Archers Hall was built in 1777 for the Royal Company of Archers, the oldest surviving company of longbowmen in Britain. Today a private club, they provide the bodyguard for the sovereign in Scotland (ceremonial today). Members must be Scottish, and are drawn from politicians, military officers and nobility. They compete annually for the "Edinburgh Arrow". The central coat of arms, with motto "Nobilis Ira" (Noble Wrath), has the shield topped with Peers helmet and demi lion rampant. This is the coat of arms of the Stewarts. The armorial to the left is the Royal coat of arms as used in Scotland, but unusually with the English motto "Dieu et Mon Droit" (God and my Right). The 3...

Scottish Silver Tableforks (Set of 12) - Robert Gray & Sons
Robert Gray & Sons, Glasgow 1844
$ 1 650.00

A fine set of 12 Victorian Scottish silver table forks, in the plain Old English pattern, these forks have a very good weight and feel in the hand. The forks are engraved with the original owners initial A with a typical Victorian flourish. The forks are in excellent condition, with long tines, these forks have not seen much use. All 12 forks have excellent hallmarks that are well struck and very clear, event Queen Victoria's hair is visible in the duty mark. The town mark also has clearly defined bird, bell and fish in the tree, the coat of arms of Glasgow. Robert Gray and Sons of Glasgow produced "some of the finest British silver of the period" (Walter Brown, Finial, June 2006).

Scottish Silver Kilt Sash Brooch   
J.S. McL., Edinburgh 1912

A magnificent Scottish kilt sash brooch, used to hold the shoulder plaid in place. The brooch has cast thistles and celtic "buttons" surrounding a spectacular cairngorm (commonly known as citrine, also called black quartz or smoky quartz). The gemstone is very impressive, amongst the largest we have seen. It has been estimated at over 100 carats, and is a round brilliant cut. The hallmarks are clear, with retailers mark J.S.McL (McLeod we assume) overstriking the makers mark. Scottish citrine is called cairngorm after its place of origin in the Scottish Highlands, and is the November birthstone, also the symbol of brightness, life and hope.

Scottish Georgian Silver Punch Ladle - Robert Gray & Sons   
Robert Gray & Sons, Glasgow 1825

A magnificent Scottish Georgian silver punch ladle, by one of the finest Scottish silversmiths of the period. The ladle has a circular bowl, finely decorated with bunches of grapes and vine leaves, the decoration is truly a work of art. The ladle has a lip which is also decorated, similar to a gadroon pattern. The handle is held in place with a traditional heart shaped plaque, this has a previous owners initials lightly scratched into it, hardly visible but a nice addition. The silver handle is also decorated with grapes and vine leaf. The original handle is wood, which has been turned into an attractive shape. The ladle is finished with a silver knob and cap, also decorated in the same fine grape and vine pattern. The ladle is a generous size and weight, is very good quality, and is in superb condition. The hallmarks are very slightly worn but still clearly visible, and include the Glasgow town mark, lion rampant, date letter G, duty mark and makers mark RG&S. Robert Gray worked in Glasgow from 1776, adding ...

Scottish Victorian Silver Cigar Case - Carstairs Family, Should Auld Acquaintance Be Forgot   
George Cunningham, Edinburgh 1858

A lovely Scottish silver cigar or cheroot case, with motto "Should auld acquaintance be forgot", and the Carstairs family crest and motto "Te Splendente", translated "Whilst thou art shining". The case is beautifully engraved with a spectacular interlocking architectural pattern interspersed with different flowers, this is one of the nicest we have seen. The case has a pleasing shape and feel, easy to slide into a pocket given its curved shape. The front of the case has "Should auld acquaintance be forgot" in the top panel, and Carstairs family crest and motto in the bottom, along with "DC to FC", we assume members of the Carstairs family. The Carstairs armorial has a chevron between 3 primroses, with sun darting its rays on a primrose above. The back has 2 circular panels, with finely engraved flowers, we assume a primrose. The hallmarks are clear, but cleverly hidden in the engraving. George Cunningham only worked between 1855 and 1858, but given the quality of this case must have been a master craftsman.

Scottish Victorian Silver Hanoverian Tablespoons (Set of 4)
George & Michael Crichton, Edinburgh 1876
$ 470.00

An unusual set of Scottish Silver Hanoverian tablespoons, made in Victorian times. These spoons are lovely spoons, very good quality and weight, a pleasure to use. The spoons have a double drop, are bottom marked and have script initials "AW" engraved on the back of the spoons, in 18th century style. The spoons were probably made to order, as they are replicas of an earlier style. The hallmarks on all 4 spoons are excellent, including makers mark "G&MC" for George and Michael Crichton, who worked between 1864 and 1876.

Georgian Scottish Silver Basting and Tablespoon - Kings Pattern
Alexander Wotherspoon, Edinburgh 1830 and 1834
$ 340.00

A Georgian Scottish silver Kings pattern basting spoon, with matching tablespoon. Both spoons are single struck, as is usual with Scottish flatware, and are engraved with initials H in fancy script, on the back of the spoons. These are lovely, substantial spoons, very suitable for use as serving spoons. The basting spoon is by Alexander Wotherspoon (1834), the tablespoon is by unknown maker WS, 1830. Both have excellent hallmarks.

Scottish Silver Quaich - Brook & Son   
Brook & Son, Edinburgh 1933

A Scottish silver quaich of traditional shape, and medium in size. It is quite plain but very good quality, and a pleasing weight. The base is engraved "Brook & Son, 87 George St, Edinburgh", and the hallmarks, including makers mark B&S, are clear. The quaich is a traditional Scottish drinking vessel, the large sized ones were passed around at ceremonial occasions. They are popular christening presents in Scotland.

Georgian Scottish Silver Dessert Spoons (Set of 4) - Patrick Robertson   
Patrick Robertson, Edinburgh 1783

An interesting set of 4 Scottish silver dessert spoons in the Old English pattern, made by a highly regarded silversmith, Patrick Robertson. The spoons are bottom marked, and are engraved with a floral device. The hallmarks are excellent, including makers mark "PR" for Patrick Robertson, which is well struck. Robertson had a long and distinguished career, he worked between 1751 and 1790. He was born in 1729, and was apprenticed to Edward Lothian in 1743. He was Deacon in 1755 and 1765, and was a member of the Royal Company of Archers. He was related to the architect Robert Adam ("Silver Made in Scotland", Dalgleish and Fothringham).

Scottish Silver Tea Strainer - Traprain Treasure   
Brook & Son, Edinburgh 1925

An interesting Roman reproduction Scottish silver tea strainer, with a stylised dolphin handle. The bowl is circular, with holes in radiating circles, and has a substantial rim. The handle is lovely, the dolphin tail is cleverly curved, to allow it to loop over a finger whilst the thumb holds the tail in place. The dolphin has a large mouth, 3 fins around the head, and the body is decorated with dots. The strainer is very good quality, and is a pleasure to use. The hallmarks are very clear, makers mark B&S in serrated punch, Scottish thistle, Edinburgh castle and date letter U. An additional hallmark is present, a stylised "S" in a diamond punch. Brook and Son were the leading Scottish silversmiths in the early 20th century, they operated between 1891 and 1939 from 87 George Street (Hamilton and Inches today). This strainer is a reproduction of a Roman spoon that was part of the Traprain Law treasure hoard, which was discovered by George Pringle at Traprain Law, East Lothian, in 1919. The hoard dates from 40...

Scottish Silver Toddy Ladles (2) - Glasgow
Donald McDonald, W. Allan, Glasgow 1836, 1860
$ 250.00

Two Scottish silver toddy ladles in the Fiddle pattern, both made in Glasgow but by different makers at a different time (not a pair). The earlier one by D. McDonald is slightly longer, and has an engraved initial W. The later one by W. Allan is shorter, and has a less pronounced bowl angle. Both have a very clear and full set of Glasgow hallmarks, the fish, bird and bell being fully visible in the town mark.

Scottish Georgian Silver Celtic Pointed Tablespoons (Pair) - Alexander Ziegler   
Alexander Ziegler, Edinburgh 1796

A pair of Georgian Scottish silver Celtic Pointed pattern tablespoons, by Alexander Ziegler, who worked in Edinburgh between 1782 and 1802. These are elegant spoons, and although tablespoons are large enough to be used as serving spoons today. Celtic Pointed (or Pointed Old English) is a style used in Scotland and Ireland, not seen in English silver (Pickford, Silver Flatware, pg 96). The spoons have contemporary engraved initials TB in traditional Scottish style. The hallmarks on both spoons are clear.

Scottish Silver Toddy Ladle - Richardson Family Crest   
Alexander Wotherspoon, Edinburgh 1830

A Fiddle pattern Scottish silver toddy ladle, with a magnificent crest - a unicorn's head erased above a crown, with the motto "Virtute Acquiritur Honos", translated "Honour is acquired by Virtue". This is the motto of the Richardson family. The crown probably indicates the families membership of the peerage. The hallmarks are very clear, including makers mark AW in strangely indented punch. AW has been attributed to Alexander Wotherspoon (British silver makers marks website) but given the similarity of the punch to JW (John Williamson) there is a high probibility of a family relationship (father and son?), so the maker could be A Williamson.

Scottish Silver tableforks (8)   
Marshall and sons, Edinburgh 1845

Scottish Fiddle pattern table forks, appear unused, with tines in excellent condition. Very clear hallmarks.

Scottish Silver Teaspoon and Sugartongs Set (6 Teaspoons, Sugartongs)
John Williamson, Edinburgh 1845
$ 200.00

A set of 6 Scottish Fiddle pattern teaspoons, the shape of the Fiddle typically Scottish. They are accompanied by matching sugartongs with shell bowls. The hallmarks on all 7 items are very clear. The punch outline of the JW makers mark is very unusual, having a wave shaped indentation at both sides. The punch shape is identical to unknown maker "AW" who worked between 1828 and 1843, we assume he was John Williamson's father. John Williamson worked between 1845 and 1881, so these are very early examples of his silver.

Scottish Silver Hanoverian Tablespoons (pair)
Lothian & Robertson, Edinburgh C 1760
$ 200.00

A pair of Scottish Hanoverian tablespoons, with initials "DMcD over MMcD", (possibly McDonald?) engraved on the back of the spoons. The spoons have a lovely feel and are a pleasing weight, good quality tablespoons very suitable for use. They have a central rib and a large drop. The hallmarks are poorly struck, but the makers mark L&R, Edinburgh castle and Scottish thistle are still visible on one spoon. The other spoon has a partial makers mark visible, being L&. The date letter is too indistinct to read, but the presence of the thistle dates them to post 1759, when the thistle replaced the assay masters mark on Scottish silver. Edward Lothian and Patrick Robertson worked in the late 1750's and early 1760's.

Scottish Silver toddy ladles (pair) - unrecorded maker   
Robert Chisholm, Edinburgh 1834

Fine pair of Fiddle pattern Scottish toddy ladles, with engraved initials WG. The makers mark is very clearly RC, possibly Robert Carfrae, who was an Edinburgh unfreeman in the early 1800's (Source Rod Dietert, who wrote Scottish Compendium) - this maker is not recorded in Jacksons. We had originally suggested Robert Clark, this is now proved incorrect as he joined the military and settled in North America circa 1800. Hallmarks very clear. We have now been informed this mark belongs to Robert Chisholm, who worked alone from 1833-1835, when he formed the very successful partnership of Mackay & Chisholm (source Henry Fothringham, Historian to the Incorporation of Goldsmiths of the city of Edinburgh, website www.incorporationofgoldsmiths.co.uk).

Scottish Silver Tablespoons (6)   
Marshall and sons, Edinburgh 1851

Pleasant set of Scottish Fiddle pattern tablespoons, of very good weight and by a well known maker. Extremely clear hallmarks on all spoons.

Georgian Scottish Silver Toddy Ladle
William Forrest & Co, Edinburgh 1829
$ 170.00

A Scottish silver toddy ladle in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved initial W. We originally ascribed the WF&Co mark to William Fillan & Co. of Aberdeen, Fillan worked between 1829 and 1849 (thanks to Robert Massart who supplied this information). We have now been informed this is the mark of William Forrest and Co. of Edinburgh, who worked between 1829 and 1874 (see www.incorporationofgoldsmiths.co.uk). Our new source is currently writing a book on Aberdeen silversmiths, and believes that William Fillan only used WF along with ABD for Aberdeen. The hallmarks are clear. This mark is not included in Jacksons.

Scottish Silver Clan Badge - Campbell Clan, Barbreck - "I Bear in Mind"   
R. W. Forsyth Ltd., Edinburgh 1938

A Scottish silver clan badge, which can be worn as a pendant or as a brooch or kilt sash pin. The badge comprises a "Lions Head Effrontee" (looking forward) with the motto "I Bear in Mind". This is the crest and motto of the Campbell clan of Barbreck. The Campbells are one of the most powerful clans of Scotland, descendants of King Robert Bruce. The Campbells of Barbreck are from the Argyll district. The badge is very good quality, the lion is cast and has lovely detail, it stands out from the badge. It is a pleasing weight, and hangs well from a chain. The hallmarks are clear, and include makers mark RWF. The badge also has a silver plaque which reads " R.W. Forsyth Ltd, Edinburgh & Glasgow". R.W. Forsyth was a leading Scottish department store from 1897 until the 1980's.

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