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Antique Silver Spoons
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Irish Provincial Limerick Hook End Soup Ladle - Joseph Johns
Joseph Johns, Limerick C 1760
$ 6 550.00

An extremely rare Irish Provincial silver soup ladle from Limerick, made by Joseph Johns, Limericks "most accomplished, prolific and arguably most successful silversmith" (A Celebration of Limerick Silver, John Bowen & Conor O'Brien, pages 140 & 198 - a book we highly recommend). The ladle is in the Rococo style, with a fluted bowl and asymmetrical chased floral decoration on the handle and back of bowl, and has a hooked terminal (or end, described as a "crooked end" by Bennett - Irish Silver, pg 115). The ladle also has an engraved family crest, an armoured arm embowed holding an arrow. The bowl, which is fluted on both sides, is huge, over 10 cms in diameter, this is a substantial ladle with a good gauge. The fluted bowl was described by Douglas Bennett as "an alluring feature feature for the collector" (Collecting Irish Silver, pg 115). The join of bowl to handle has character, the drop has worn engraving, and also a semi circular strengthening plate, which unfortunately was not strong enough to prevent da...

17th Century Provincial Silver Apostle Spoon - Thomas Dare II, Taunton
Thomas Dare II, Taunton C 1660-1680
$ 4 850.00

A very interesting West Country Provincial Apostle spoon, made by Thomas Dare II of Taunton. The Apostle has a circular nimbus with flying dove, the modelling is slightly crude (for example facial features not very distinct), his right hand is higher than his left, he appears to be holding something stretching between both hands, possibly the bat of St James, but this could also be a fold in his robe. He stands on the usual pedestal, and retains a pleasing amount of the original gilding. The join is flat (as opposed to London made V joint spoons), as is usual for provincial spoons, the stem is flat front and back but has rounded edges. It joins to the bowl with a small crude rat-tail, the bowl is the traditional fig shape, with deep bowl and strong curve from stem. This Apostle could also be St Matthew or St John, but safest to describe it as a generic Apostle spoon with no coherant emblem. The spoon is struck 4 times with makers mark TD in shaped shield over Fleur De Lys (M 38 in Tim Kent's book "West Count...

Charles I Seal Top Silver Communion Spoon - Daniel Cary, First Fifteen London Spoonmaker   
Daniel Cary, London 1639

A Charles I silver seal top communion spoon, which has holes in the bowl for straining communion wine. The seal top has the original initials "C over A=L", which is quite crudely engraved. The baluster seal top has traces of gilding, and is attached with a V-shaped joint, as is usual with London spoons. The hexagonal stem is tapered, joined to the bowl with a small rat tail. The fig shaped bowl is quite deep, and has been punched with holes in 3 concentric circles. The bowl is struck with the crowned leopard's head, the crown is clear, but the face is worn. The 3 hallmarks on the stem are clear, and include sterling lion, date letter B for 1639 and maker's mark D enclosing C for Daniel Cary. Cary was a prolific spoon maker. He worked between 1604 and 1639, he died in 1641. Cary is one of the "First Fifteen London spoon makers 1580 - 1697" As identified by Tim Kent in his book "London Silver Spoonmakers", which we highly recommend. Steven Venables, another notes spoon maker, was one of Cary's appren...

Commonwealth Silver Child's Puritan Spoon - Steven Venables
Steven Venables, London C 1650
$ 2 700.00

An extremely rare child's puritan spoon, dating back to the Commonwealth period, when Oliver Cromwell was Lord Protector of England. The spoon has a flat stem with straight sides, and a curved spade shaped bowl. The spoon also has a small V shaped drop. The puritan spoon replaced the slip-top spoon (with hexagonal stem and fig shaped bowl) during the early Commonwealth period, and gained it's name from Cromwell's Puritan soldiers opposed to King Charles I, who considered the more elaborate Apostle spoons "irreverant" (Gask, Old Silver Spoons of England, pg 92). Given that so much silver was melted down during and after the English civil war, Puritan spoons are rare, and the smaller children's puritan spoons are extremely rare. A very similar spoon to this, described as "Rare Charles I child's puritan spoon, 1646, exhibited in Cardiff Museum" was sold as lot 35 of the famous "Alexander James Collection of Early English Silver Spoons", Phillips 1979, with an estimate of GBP 500-600. Steven Venables worked in L...

17th Century Provincial Seal Top Spoon - Taunton
Unknown, West Country, probably Taunton C 1640
$ 2 650.00

A provincial silver Seal Top spoon, with an acanthus baluster seal top, which is probably a Taunton casting. The seal top is well made, and has remnants of gilding throughout, especially in the recessed areas. The stem is flattened hexagonal, and the bowl is the traditional fig shape, and it has a small rat-tail . The seal top has remnants of prick engraving, some pricks clearly visible, but not enough to read what was engraved. The spoon bowl itself is the traditional shape, with deep bowl, curving down from the stem. The spoon is struck 3 times by the same makers mark, once in the bowl and twice on the stem. The marks are not very clear, either they are worn or more probably struck with a worn punch. The punch has a rough shield shape with irregular edge, with a trifid top edge (Poole, Identifying British Silver, punch shapes, pg 15). The figure in the punch has a smaller roughly circular shape on top of a larger circular shape, our imagination runs to a crown over rose, piece of fruit or even a bird (with ...

Rare Rattail Brittania Silver Hanoverian Serving Ladle - George I   
Gabriel Sleath, London 1719

An extremely rare, Brittania silver, rattail soup ladle in the Hanoverian pattern, of good gauge. The patination on the ladle is lovely, and the bowl, rattail and handle are in proportion, with no sign of alteration. The ladle has the initials E*G scratch engraved on the back of the handle. The stem rises at a sharp angle (almost 90 degrees) to the bowl, the characteristics of a ladle as opposed to a spoon. Snodin (English silver spoons, 1974, pg 46) describes the earliest ladles as dating from the 1730's, this is a rare early example. The hallmarks are worn but visible, the makers mark is very worn, with only the outline of the shield and a ghosting of the makers initials visible. The date letter is poorly struck, but visible enought to determine D from 1719 fairly confidently. Given the wear on the makers mark, an interesting debate has ensued as to the maker. The first letter is definitely S, the second is unclear, the distinctively shaped shield surrounding the makers mark is clearly visible. We had origi...

Rare Charles I Slip Top Spoon - Daniel Cary   
Daniel Cary, London 1631

A very rare and well preserved slip top spoon, of good gauge, by one of the "First Fifteen" London spoonmakers as identified by Tim Kent (London Silver Spoonmakers, 1500-1697). The slip top is engraved "BB, Feb 13, 1632", in a very attractive fashion, so probably was a Christening present. The spoon has a curved fig shaped bowl, and tapered hexagonal stem, ending in the slipped end. The bowl is hallmarked with crowned leopards head, the base of the stem with makers mark "D enclosing C" for Daniel Cary, alongside a well struck lion passant, and date letter O for 1631, struck at the end of the stem, as is usual during this period. The stem is attached to the bowl with a very stubby and rough rat tail, also usual for the period. This is a lovely spoon, and has a very good feel about it, I am tempted to use it (but have resisted!). A very similar spoon to this by Daniel Cary was sold in the Alexander James Collection of Early English Spoons, by Phillips in 1979. Lot 36 (pg 55), shows a slip top spoon made by Dani...

Rare Provincial Seal Top Spoon, Taunton - Salisbury Group A Finial
John Smith II, Taunton 1661
$ 2 250.00

A rare west country seal top silver spoon, with a Salisbury Group A finial. The seal top is prick engraved "E.B over T.B, 1661", indicating the celebration of a marriage. The bowl is fig shaped, and the stem is tapered and faceted. A small rat-tail connects the bowl to the stem. The seal top join is clearly visible at the back of the spoon, a horizontal join, as opposed to V joint seen on London spoons. The seal top is a decorative baluster casting, of substantial size, decorated with scrolls and gadrooning. This has been described by Tim Kent as a "Salisbury Group A" (Salisbury Silver and its Makers, 1550-1700, Silver Society Journal 3), where similar examples are illustrated on page 16. Kent has recognised that many West Country seal tops of the period were made by one silversmith who specialised in seal top castings, and who distributed them to the silversmiths of the area. Kent also identifies John Smith II as one of the silversmiths who used these (he cites an example of a Salisbury type B found on a sea...

Georg Jensen Sterling Silver Flatware Set (36) - Acorn Pattern
Georg Jensen, Copenhagen 1945-1951
$ 2 250.00

Set of Georg Jensen sterling silver flatware in the popular Acorn pattern, designed by Johan Rhode in 1915. Rhode was probably the most influential of all the designers who worked at Georg Jensen, and the Acorn pattern is the most popular of all of Jensen's flatware designs, still in production today. The set comprises of 12 teaspoons (medium size), 12 cakeforks and 12 butterknives, which are also suitable for pate. The butterknives all have silver blades (these are sometimes produced with steel blades). Each of the 36 pieces is clearly hallmarked "Sterling Denmark Georg Jensen & Wendal A/S", the mark used between 1945 and 1951 on items retailed in Copenhagen.

Elizabethan Seal Top Silver Spoon   
Orb and Cross, London 1575

Early sealtop spoon with squat fluted baluster terminal, engraved with original owners initials VV (or W). These initials are repeated on the bowl above the hallmark. The stem is hexagonal and tapered, and the V joint attaching the finial is clearly visible. The bowl has deep concave sides, and curves steeply from the base of the stem. The stem has 3 hallmarks at the base, a clearly visible "orb and cross" makers mark, and worn marks indicating lion passant and date mark S. The bowl has the usual towmmark, but this is worn, with only the outline visible. This spoon comes complete with an original receipt from H Perovetz Ltd of London, who sold it to Mr McCay of South Africa in 1979 for 700 pounds. The receipt and original Perovetz tag confirms the maker and date, and refers to Jackson pg 105 and How pg 228, plate 8. (Note: In our previous description we had mentioned some doubt about the London attribution, suggesting the makers mark could possibly be the Cobbold's of Norwich, given the shape of the shield ...

Tiffany Sterling Silver Indian Chrysanthemum Tablespoons (Set of 6)
Tiffany & Co, New York 1880-1934
$ 1 950.00

A fabulous set of 6 Tiffany Sterling silver Indian Chrysanthemum tablespoons, in immaculate condition, they could not be better. The pattern is truly beautiful, it extends right down the back of the spoon bowls as well. All 6 spoons are clearly hallmarked "TIFFANY & Co STERLING PAT.1880.M, the M indicates these are early pieces (the pattern was produced from 1880-1934). This must be one of the most beautiful example of hallmarks, with the design wrapping over and through the hallmarks. Each individual spoon weighs 120 grams, certainly the heaviest tablespoons we have encountered (the very best quality English tablespoons can reach 100 grammes). Indian Chrysanthemum has been described as "one of the most magnificent and celebrated sterling silver designs of the 19th century. Chrysanthemum represents one of the last great designs of the Victorian period" -(www.replacements.com), it was designed by Charles Grosjean. "Master silversmith Charles T. Grosjean joined the Tiffany firm as the Superintendent of Silverwa...

Cape Silver Lemoen Lepels (Pair) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1814
$ 1 550.00

A fabulous pair of Cape Silver lemoen lepels, (orange spoons), in excellent condition, and with very clear makers mark. The spoons are typical of the Cape lemoen lepels, with pointed terminal and bowl, the bowl itself eye shaped and quite deep. The spoons have typical Cape engraving, with a 4 petal flower and wrigglework along the edges of the handles. They also have a distinctive V joint connecting handle to bowl, the 2 v joints are quite different in angle and style, reflecting their hand-made character. The IC makers mark on both spoons is well struck and clear (Welz mark 32 with canted corners). Welz describes orange spoons as"probably the most attractive type of spoon made at the Cape, derived from Dutch spoons", pg 95. He also notes that all known examples are by Cape born silversmiths of the early 19th century (so not made by the more prolific English immigrants who arrived after 1815). As far as we are aware, only Jan Lotter and Johannes combrink made lemoen lepels, probably between 1800 and 1815.

Silver Jubilee 16th Century Knop End Spoons (Set of 10) - Seal Tops, Lion Sejant, Maidenhead, Wrythen, Pudsey
C J Vander, Garrard & Co, London (8), Sheffield (2) 1977
$ 1 550.00

A very interesting collection of 10 silver replica spoons, all in 16th century style, made to commemorate the silver jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II in 1977. These are lovely spoons, all very good quality, with very clear hallmarks, and are faithful replicas of the originals, mostly in museums. The spoons include: 1. Leicester spoon, Seal Top, circa 1600 2. Wrythen Knob spoon, London 1500 3. Maidenhead spoon, London 1521 (Blessed Virgin Mary) 4. Owl Knopped spoon, London 1506, original set of 6 at Corpus Christi College, Oxford 5. Lion Sejant, London 1570 6. Cone spoon, London 1538 - "Fruitlet Knop" 7. Pudsey spoon, London 1525, Tudor rose on seal (Mayer Museum, Liverpool) 8. Seal Top spoon, London 1544 9. Leicester spoon, seal top circa 1600, Brittania silver 10. Lion Sejant, London 1570, Brittania silver The first 8 spoons (sterling) were made by CJ Vander in London (one dated 1976 without jubilee mark), the last 2 were made by Garrards in Sheffield, in the higher grade Brittania silver (950). Seve...

Georgian Silver Flatware Set (17 pieces)
William Chawner, London 1828, 1829, 1895
$ 1 550.00

A matching set of crested Georgian silver flatware, including 12 tablespoons, 2 sauce ladles, 2 saltspoons and butterknife, all of very good gauge and quality. The pattern is Fiddle and Thread, and all pieces have an interesting double crest, indicating a marriage between 2 noble families. The first crest is of a head and shoulders of a bearded man with unruly hair, the second a raised fist holding a halbeard. The saltspoons have gilded bowls to prevent corrosion. The butterknife is a later addition to the set (made in 1895), and only has the bearded man crest. The makers mark on the butterknife has been removed, possibly to allow the retailer to overstamp. Chawner was a prolific spoonmaker, he ran a large workshop of journeymen, whose individual marks can be seen on the spoons (devices include stars, bars, circles and triangles).

Rare 17th Century Memorial Dutch Silver Spoon and Fork set - Sara Lewes, VOC silver?   
unmarked, Probably Dutch C 1672

Beautiful 17th century memorial (memento mori) matching spoon and fork set in outstanding condition, we feel they deserve to be in a museum. Both have cast triangular handles with an unusual finial, which appears to be a naked woman with a serpents head. The fork has 3 prongs, and the spoon has a crude short rattail. Both are engraved " SARA LEWES Obyt 7 Juny 1672". This set is illustrated and described on page 90-91 of the book "Cape Silver" by Stephan Welz, 1976. Welz describes them as possibly Cape, but we feel they are more likely to be Dutch. A very similar spoon is depicted on page 142 of "Dutch Silver" by M.H. Guns, the spoon has an almost identical bowl and shaft. No hallmarks are present. Note: - The curator of the Silver Dept, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, has now described this set as Auricular form, typical of Netherlands in the second half of the 17 th century. His opinion is that it is probably colonial, as known Dutch examples have hallmarks. This set has now been featured in an excellent article in ...

Cape Silver Lemoen Lepel and Konfyt Fork (Orange Spoon and Preserve Fork) - Pair, Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1820

A rare Cape Silver lemoen lepel (orange spoon) and matching konfyt fork (preserve), we have not encountered a matching set before, none are recorded in the Cape silver reference books. The spoon is the traditional elegant lemoen lepel shape, with narrow, pointed boat shaped bowl, v shaped drop, and triangular terminal. The matching fork has 4 tines, both feature traditional Cape prick engraving with a 4 petalled flower. Both are clearly hallmarked with makers mark IC in rectangular punch with canted corners for Johannes Combrink, and also are punched with initials IFS, we assume the original owner. Welz describes orange spoons as"probably the most attractive type of spoon made at the Cape, derived from Dutch spoons", pg 95. He also notes that all known examples are by Cape born silversmiths of the early 19th century (so not made by the more prolific English immigrants who arrived after 1815). Heller, in his book History of Cape Silver, describes orange spoons as "exquisite". Johannes Combrink of the famous Co...

Arts and Crafts Silver Spoons - Sibyl Dunlop
Sibyl Dunlop, London 1929
$ 1 400.00

Magnificent pair of Arts and Crafts spoons by Sibyl Dunlop, one of the leading female practitioners of the Arts and Crafts movement. The spoons are in the shape and style of 16th century spoons, with fig shaped bowl, hexagonal stem and shaped finials. The spoons are cast, with hand hammered bowls, and have a cast finial that resembles a pineapple with scrolls on either side, resting on 3 rings. A furrow runs down the front end of the shaft of each spoon. These spoons are very good quality, with pleasing weight, lovely to hold and use. The hallmarks on both spoons are very clear, including the SD makers mark. Dunlop (1889-1968) was born in Scotland, trained as a jewellery designer in Brussels, and opened a shop in Kensington Street, London. She specialised in Arts and Crafts silver and jewellery, often naturalistic in style.

Cape Silver Tablespoon and Tablefork Set (8, 4 of each) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 1 250.00

A set of 8 Cape Silver tablespoons and table forks (4 of each) in the Old English pattern, all with original owners engraved initials JM in script. The forks are lovely, long and elegant, and in great condition, the spoons have seen more use, with wear to the bowls. The spoons have wide circular drops, more continental in style. Six pieces (4 spoons and 2 forks) have additional initials AFDT engraved on the back of the stems, we assume an earlier owner, the AFDT showing signs of wear. Seven items have excellent hallmarks (makers mark IC and crude anchor, Welz mark 25), one fork has different marks, makers mark IC struck with a worn punch (Welz mark 29) and what appears to be crowned leopards head (clearly struck but worn punch, outline clear but no detail). Combrink had a long career, and this IC mark with worn punch is well known, it is assumed the punch became worn over time. The crowned leopard town mark is more of a mystery, this punch was used by Twentyman and Waldek (Welz 135 and 163), and is unknown by...

Rare Palm Pattern Silver Soup Spoons (Set of 4)
George Adams, London 1876
$ 1 250.00

A very rare set of 4 Palm pattern soup spoons, made by George Adams of Chawner & Co, who were the most important mid 19th century firm of spoon makers (Pickford, Jacksons Hallmarks, pg 56). The spoons are exceptional quality and weight, just under 100 grammes each, they are a joy to hold. The spoons are engraved with the original owners initials, "JK & CK". The Palm pattern is described as "very rare, produced by Chawner & Co, in whose pattern book it appears" by Pickford in his book "Silver Flatware, pg 148". The book also has a photo of a Palm pattern fork and spoon from the V&A museum. The spoons are beautifully made, with good detail on the palm leaves. The hallmarks on all 4 spoons are extremely clear, marked on the bowl to prevent damage to the pattern. Two interesting journeymans marks are also present, 3 dots and K, probably the craftsmen involved in making the spoons. A Palm pattern tablespoon sold as lot 73, Finial postal auction January 2012. Please note we also have a Palm pattern butter knife, S1...

Rare Scottish Provincial Tablespoons (Set of 8) - Alexander Thompson, Aberdeen
Alexander Thompson, Aberdeen 1770-1779
$ 1 250.00

A rare set of early Scottish Provincial tablespoons from Aberdeen, in the Old English pattern. The spoons all have engraved initial "P", which is contemporary. The spoons are early, and have a double drop. The spoons have pleasing dimensions, and are a good weight. The hallmarks include makers mark "AT" in script for Alexander Thompson, who worked between 1770 and 1779 in Aberdeen. The second mark is "ABD.n" in script, for Aberdeen (see Jackson pg 584). All 8 spoons are hallmarked, but some hallmarks have been slightly compressed during shaping of the spoons, and some are lightly struck or worn. Alexander Thompson was apprenticed to Coline Allan (one of Aberdeen's finest silversmiths), he was free in 1770, but unfortunately died young in 1779. He made very high quality spoons (Michael Wilson, Aberdeen Silver, A Collectors Guide, pg 32, which is a book we highly recommend).

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