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Cape Silver
Records 1 to 133 of 133
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Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Oltman Ahlers
Oltman Ahlers, Cape 1810-1827
$ 310.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Old English pattern, with 3 tines. The fork is hallmarked with makers mark OA in oval punch, this is faintly struck but still visible, between two square devices with 4 dots, these are both clearly struck ( Welz mark 2). Ahlers worked as a silversmith between 1810 and his death in 1827. He married the widow of silversmith Jan Brevis, which may have facilitated his entry into the trade. He was the son of Oltman Alders of Germany, his mother was Dorothea of Bengal, who presumably arrived in the Cape as a slave. His silver is quite scarce.

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Two) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 310.00

Two Cape silver tablespoons (not a pair), but both in Old English pattern and both by Johannes Combrink. The first has engraved owners initials JM in script, this spoon has excellent hallmarks, makers mark IC and the anchor (Welz mark 25), and a rounded drop. It also has the initials AFDT struck on the back of the stem, we assume another owner. The second has a slightly wider handle, no initials, and very clear makers mark IC (Welz mark 32).

Cape Silver Convex Snuff Box - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 1 500.00

An interesting Cape silver snuff box, an unusual convex shape which gives it a lovely feel in the hand and pocket. The box has a part hinged lid, as is usual with this form, with just a slight overlap creating the thumbpiece. The decoration is typically Cape, a 8 petalled flower with wrigglework border, which is extremely well preserved due to the shape of the lid. The box also has original owners engraved initials AWJP, also with wrigglework border. The hinge is also decorated with cross hatch engraving. The original gilt interior is a lemon yellow colour, and the IC makers mark struck in the lid is very clear and distinct ( Welz mark 32). Convex shaped snuff boxes, given the more challenging construction in relation to the rectangular boxes, are rare in the Cape, this demonstrates that Combrink was a master craftsman.

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Marthinus Lourens Smith
Marthinus Lourens Smith, Cape C 1800
$ 390.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Fiddle pattern, with 3 tines. The fork has the original owners initials PJS, quite quaintly engraved in Colonial style.The fork has excellent hallmarks, they could not be better. They include makers mark MLS and the leaf device, with the veins clearly visible (Welz mark 117). Smith was a Dane who arrived in the Cape as a VOC employee in 1757 aged 35, he died in 1806. He led an interesting life, he married 4 times, and had 10 children.

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Set of 6) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 940.00

A set of 6 Old English pattern Cape silver tablespoons, made by Johannes Combrink. All 6 spoons have engraved owners initials G, we assume the original owner. This set has been made by hand, there are slight differences in length, also differences in the shape of the handle, with some having narrower ends. One spoon also has a noticeably larger bowl than the other 5, so perhaps made at a different time. The drop on 2 spoons is also slightly longer, overall interesting but subtle differences between the spoons. The hallmarks also exhibit differences, three spoons are struck with makers mark IC three times, the other three are struck with makers mark IC four times (similar to the English duty dodgers). The orientation of the marks also differs, some are struck vertically and some sideways, so it appears the silversmith struck marks quite randomly. This mark is 29 or mark 30 in the book Cape Silver by Welz, the C is quite close the the I, and has short arms, almost looks like a K. The slightly larger spoon, whic...

Cape Silver Lemoen Lepels (Pair) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1814
$ 1 550.00

A fabulous pair of Cape Silver lemoen lepels, (orange spoons), in excellent condition, and with very clear makers mark. The spoons are typical of the Cape lemoen lepels, with pointed terminal and bowl, the bowl itself eye shaped and quite deep. The spoons have typical Cape engraving, with a 4 petal flower and wrigglework along the edges of the handles. They also have a distinctive V joint connecting handle to bowl, the 2 v joints are quite different in angle and style, reflecting their hand-made character. The IC makers mark on both spoons is well struck and clear (Welz mark 32 with canted corners). Welz describes orange spoons as"probably the most attractive type of spoon made at the Cape, derived from Dutch spoons", pg 95. He also notes that all known examples are by Cape born silversmiths of the early 19th century (so not made by the more prolific English immigrants who arrived after 1815). As far as we are aware, only Jan Lotter and Johannes combrink made lemoen lepels, probably between 1800 and 1815.

Cape Silver Tablespoon and Tablefork Set (8, 4 of each) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 1 250.00

A set of 8 Cape Silver tablespoons and table forks (4 of each) in the Old English pattern, all with original owners engraved initials JM in script. The forks are lovely, long and elegant, and in great condition, the spoons have seen more use, with wear to the bowls. The spoons have wide circular drops, more continental in style. Six pieces (4 spoons and 2 forks) have additional initials AFDT engraved on the back of the stems, we assume an earlier owner, the AFDT showing signs of wear. Seven items have excellent hallmarks (makers mark IC and crude anchor, Welz mark 25), one fork has different marks, makers mark IC struck with a worn punch (Welz mark 29) and what appears to be crowned leopards head (clearly struck but worn punch, outline clear but no detail). Combrink had a long career, and this IC mark with worn punch is well known, it is assumed the punch became worn over time. The crowned leopard town mark is more of a mystery, this punch was used by Twentyman and Waldek (Welz 135 and 163), and is unknown by...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork -Johan Anton Bunning   
Johan Anton Bunning?, Cape C 1800
$ 350.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Fiddle pattern, with 3 tines. The tines are different from most konfyt forks, these are quite fat, widely spaced and short (3.3. cm). The fork has original owners initials TFM, the engraving in an unusual script, quite pleasing overall. The fork has makers mark I.B in oval punch, with the I and B co-joined. This is depicted in the book "Cape Silver and Silversmiths" by Stephan Welz as mark 20, page 146, for Johan Anton Bunning, a German soldier who arrived in the Cape in 1758 and died in 1793. He mark is confirmed as he made silver for the Dutch Reformed Church, whose records confirm him as maker, but the Fiddle pattern style of the fork is problematic, as it was only introduced circa 1800, so it is unlikely he made this fork. A number of alternatives exist, it could have been made by a son (Cape silversmiths regularly carried on using punches created by fathers). More likely is that this is the mark of another Cape silversmith, whose mark has not yet been attributed. IB or JB...

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Pair 2) - Cape Regiment, Bugle, Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1817
$ 620.00

A rare pair of Cape silver tablespoons in the Old English pattern, engraved with the crest of the Cape Regiment. The spoons are engraved "CAPE.REG" above a bugle, suspended from a shamrock shape rope knot. This bugle was used as a crest for English Light regiments, currently still used by the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (lightbobs). As is often the case with regimental silver, these spoons have been well used (and well polished), so the crest is worn, one is better than the other. Both spoons have clear Cape silver hallmarks, anchor, IC, anchor, mark 22 in Cape Silver by Welz, used by Johannes Combrink. The Cape Regiment was formed in 1795, and consisted of Khoisan and Coloured men under white officers, headquartered in Simonstown. In 1817 it was renamed the Cape Corps, it remained in existence until 1926. Major Matthew Richmond, a New Zealand Colonial administrator and politician, served with the Cape Regiment in 1817, so may have used these spoons. (note - we have 2 sets of these spoons)....

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Pair 1) - Cape Regiment, Bugle, Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1817
$ 700.00

A rare pair of Cape silver tablespoons in the Old English pattern, engraved with the crest of the Cape Regiment. The spoons are engraved "CAPE.REG" above a bugle, suspended from a shamrock shape rope knot. This bugle was used as a crest for English Light regiments, currently still used by the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (lightbobs). As is often the case with regimental silver, these spoons have been well used (and well polished), so the crest is worn, one is better than the other. Both spoons have clear Cape silver hallmarks, anchor, IC, anchor, mark 22 in Cape Silver by Welz, used by Johannes Combrink. The Cape Regiment was formed in 1795, and consisted of Khoisan and Coloured men under white officers, headquartered in Simonstown. In 1817 it was renamed the Cape Corps, it remained in existence until 1926. Major Matthew Richmond, a New Zealand Colonial administrator and politician, served with the Cape Regiment in 1817, so may have used these spoons. (note - we have 2 sets of these spoons)....

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johann Voigt
Johann Voigt (Possibly), Cape C 1791
$ 350.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork, in the Old English pattern with feather edge decoration and 3 tines, dating it around 1790 to 1800. The fork is struck with a makers mark only, i:V:G in an unusual shaped punch, which moulds around the dotted i. This fork matches S 1787, the main difference being longer tines (we believe original, these have not been shortened) and a makers mark that is good but not as clearly struck as the other. Welz describes this maker as unknown, but Heller (History of Cape Silver Vol I, pg 163) lists this maker as Johann Voigt? Both authors depict a different IVG punch from this one, with an additional fish hallmark (see our tablespoon S 1571 by the same maker to see the different punch and fish hallmark). Overall we agree with Welz and are not convinced by the attribution to Voigt, it seems far more likely to belong to a "van G" maker (for example van Graan, a known Cape name). Overall an interesting hallmark that requires further research. Note - a matching konfyt fork by the same maker is a...

Cape Silver Dessert Spoons (Mixed set of 6) - Twentyman, Moore, Townsend, Daniel
John Townsend (1), Peter Clarke Daniel (1) Lawrence Twentyman (2), William Moore (2), Cape C 1820-1850
$ 800.00

A mixed set of 6 Cape silver dessert spoons, all in the Fiddle pattern. 2 spoons have original owners engraved initials (HR and WFS), one has the very faint remains of a family crest and engraved initial B, and 3 have no initials or crests. All 6 spoons have very clear Cape silver hallmarks, with no wear, showing quite a lot of different pseudo hallmarks used by Cape silversmiths, so an interesting collection. The first spoon is by Peter Clarke Daniel (PD, pseudo duty, pseudo date letter B, mark 42 in Welz), Daniel was born in Dublin but arrived in South Africa with the 1820 settlers as a child. The second is by John Townsend (JT, pseudo duty mark, date letter a, lion passant and duty mark, mark 123 in Welz). The next 2 are by William Moore (WM, Cape stub mark, Welz mark 100, one spoon also has an incuse D mark, either a journeyman or owners mark). The last 2 are by Lawrence Twentyman but with different hallmarks and made at different times (the Fiddle pattern noticeably different on these 2 spoons). The firs...

Cape Silver Tableforks (Pair) - Lodewyk Beck
Lodewyk Beck, Cape 1847-1867
$ 340.00

A pair of Cape silver Fiddle pattern table forks, with traditional pseudo English hallmarks, which are clear on both forks. 5 hallmarks are present (Welz mark 4 in his Cape silver book, although struck in different order), they include makers mark LB, pseudo lion passant (quite fat with "camel hump"), pseudo Georgian duty mark, pseudo 3 turreted castle town mark (copy of Edinburgh town mark), and date letter a (which is struck upside down). Lodewyk Beck worked between 1847 and 1867 from Shortmarket Street and Greenmarket Square (still a vibrant market today), he was one of 6 Cape silversmiths who used pseudo English hallmark punches.

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johann Voigt
Johann Voigt (Possibly), Cape C 1791
$ 390.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork, in the Old English pattern with feather edge decoration and 3 tines, dating it around 1790 to 1800. The fork is struck with a makers mark only, i:V:G in an unusual shaped punch, which moulds around the dotted i. This mark is well struck, and is clearly different from the I:VG mark depicted in Cape Silver by Welz (mark 170, pg 158), the key differences being the shaped punch above i and the second : between the V and G. Welz describes this maker as unknown, but Heller (History of Cape Silver Vol I, pg 163) lists this maker as Johann Voigt? Both authors depict a different IVG punch from this one, with an additional fish hallmark (see our tablespoon S 1571 by the same maker to see the different punch and fish hallmark). Overall we agree with Welz and are not convinced by the attribution to Voigt, it seems far more likely to belong to a "van G" maker (for example van Graan, a known Cape name). Overall an interesting hallmark that requires further research. Note - a matching konfyt fork ...

Wildlife Society 50th Anniversary Silver Gilt Medallion Set (24 medallions in original box)
Cape 1976-1978
$ 780.00

A set of 24 gilded sterling silver medallions, produced to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Wildlife Society of Southern Africa. The medallions are all in perfect condition, and are beautifully engraved, these are extremely high quality. Each weighs 36.5 grammes, has a proof like finish and is gold plated sterling silver. The complete set comes in original wooden box with red leather top and velvet and silk lined interior. The medallions depict 24 different South African wild animals including: baboon, buffalo, cheetah, crocodile, elephant, fish eagle, giraffe, green mamba, hippopotamus, hyena, impala, jackal, kudu, leopard, lion, oryx, rhinoceros, sable antelope, secretary bird, vervet monkey, warthog, waterbuck, wildebeest, and zebra. The reverse depicts the emblem of the Wildlife Society, a stylised sable antelope, surrounded by "ANNIVERSARY 50 HERDENKING". Each medallion also carries 4 hallmarks, "ET+, STG, antelope head, date letter C, being South African sterling hallmarks made by Africana Mint. T...

Cape Silver Teaspoons (Set of 6) - Daniel Beets
Daniel Beets, Cape 1812-1828
$ 780.00

A set of six Cape silver teaspoons in the Fiddle pattern, by Daniel Beets. All 6 spoons have original owners engraved initials JMB. All 6 teaspoons are clearly hallmarked in the same way, with makers mark DB struck twice, alternating with a pseudo Lion passant standard mark, also struck twice. This is a rare combination of marks, not recorded in Cape Silver by Welz, where he shows Beets with star and circular devices, but not with the lion passant punch. Heller shows a Beets mark interspersed with pseudo kings head duty marks, also not shown in Welz, which shows Beets dis also occasionally use pseudo punches. Daniel Beets worked between 1812 and 1828, he was the illegitimate son of German Balthus Beets and Cape slave Angana. His son, also Daniel Beets, also practised as a silversmith, but as he probaly used his fathers punches, no marks are recorded for him. We postulate these could possibly be Daniel Beets Junior, sharing pseudo punches with fellow silversmiths, a practice that is known to have happened.

Cape Silver Teaspoons (6) - Lotter Family
Cape C 1815
$ 700.00

A mixed and interesting set of 6 Cape silver Old English pattern teaspoons, all made by members of the Lotter family of Cape silversmiths. It consists of 3 matched spoons by Gerhardus Lotter, 2 spoons by his cousin Carel David Lotter, and 1 spoon by his brother Willem Godfried Lotter. The 3 spoons by Gerhardus are marked by makers mark GL (Welz mark 68), one spoon by Carel has makers mark CDL (Welz mark 63), the other Carel spoon has CDL between 2 stars (Welz mark 64). The Willem spoon has WGL between 2 L shaped devices (Welz mark 94), all marks are clear. One Carel spoon has original engraved initials DJLR, the other 5 have no engraving. The spoons have very slight differences in style and length, but they are close enough to be used as a set.

Cape Silver Konfyt Forks (Two) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 540.00

Two Cape silver four prong Old English pattern konfyt (preserve) forks, by Johannes Combrink. The forks are similar but have slight differences when viewed together, so probably made at different times. The longer fork has a wider stem end, but shorter tines, and is 1 gramme heavier. Both are hallmarked with a single makers mark IC (Welz mark 32, pg 147), both are clear and well struck.

Cape Silver Teaspoons (Pair) - De Jongh, Pollnitz
J. De. Jongh, Cape 1837-1847
$ 430.00

An interesting pair of Cape Silver Old English pattern teaspoons, by the rare maker J De Jongh. The spoons have a Continental feel, with a rounded drop and strong overhang at the end of the spoons. They are stamped with full makers mark "J.DE.JONGH" (Welz mark 43, pg 148, Cape Silver), and are also stamped with initials IFP, the initials here being individually struck, as can be seen from their irregular pattern. Welz provides no details for De Jongh, saying only it appears on silverware as though it was a makers mark. David Heller (History of Cape Silver, pg 77) refers to De Jongh as a "seldom found" maker, indirectly connected to the Lotter family (relation of Hendrik de Jongh, married to Johanna Combrink in 1795, sister to silversmith Johannes Combrink). The initials IFP are retailers marks for Johan Frederik Pollnitz, of the firm Wagner (or Wagener) & Von Pollnitz, who retailed silver amongst other goods from Longmarket Street between 1837 and 1847 (Morrison, The silversmiths and goldsmiths of the Cape o...

Cape Silver Tableforks (Set of 4) - Lodewyk Beck
Lodewyk Beck, Cape 1847-1867
$ 620.00

An interesting set of 4 Cape silver Fiddle pattern tableforks, by Lodewyk Beck. They have no initials, although 1 fork has the remnants of an initial just visible. It appears 1 fork was made at a different time, as the hallmarks are struck differently from the other 3. The hallmarks include makers mark LB with 4 pseudo English hallmarks, including lion, duty mark, castle town mark and date letter a. What is interesting about the hallmarks is that they are all individually struck, with not too much care, both the sterling lion and the date letter have been struck upside down on one, it appears the order and orientation of hallmarks was not important to Cape silversmiths. The 4th fork, has the same hallmarks but struck further apart. Lodewyk Willem Christiaan Beck worked between 1847 and 1867, from Shortmarket street and Greenmarket Square.

Silver Apostle Spoons - St James the Greater, St Jude
Cape Mint, Cape 1978
$ 120.00

Two sterling silver Apostle spoons, the first St. Jude and the second St. James the Greater. Both Apostles are well modeled, with lovely detail. St. Jude carries an axe, St. James a staff and bible. Both spoons are from a set (no 146) which originally contained 13 spoons, issued by The Heritage Collection in 1978, limited to 1000 sets. The hallmarks are clear, and include maker mark CM (Cape Mint, part of the Pagliari Group), STG for Sterling silver, antelope head for South Africa, and date letter E for 1978. Both spoons have the Apostle's name engraved on the stem.

Cape Silver Basting Spoon - Willem Lotter
Willem Godfried Lotter, Cape 1810-1835
$ 780.00

A Cape silver basting (or serving) spoon in the Fiddle pattern, by Willem Godfried Lotter, one of the members of the famous Lotter family of Cape silversmiths. The spoon is engraved with initials CIT in fancy script, this is original. This is a good solid spoon, very suitable for use, the bowl is a good gauge and the tip is excellent. The hallmarks are clear, and consist of makers mark WGL between 2 diamond devices (actually square with a cross in the middle), mark 89 in Cape Silver by Stephan Welz. Willem Lotter worked between 1810 and 1835, his work is represented in the Paarl musuem. David Heller (History of Cape Silver) regarded Lotter as one of the top Cape silversmiths.

Cape Silver Dessert Fork - William Moore, showing error in Morrison and Heller
William Moore, Cape 1840-1863
$ 270.00

A Cape silver Fiddle pattern dessert fork, with contemporary engraved initial M. The fork has excellent hallmarks, makers mark WM and the Cape Stub mark (see our articles section) consisting of 4 English pseudo hallmarks, Lion passant, date letter capital A, Georgian kings head duty mark and leopards head (town mark for London). The fork is very good quality and weight, and is suitable for use. The tines are very long, longer than usual, this fork has probably not been used. What is interesting about this Cape stub mark is that the punch is showing signs of wear, particularly the Leopards head. This lead to a mistake in Morrison (The Silversmiths and Goldsmiths of the Cape of Good Hope, 1936, pg 59), and later Heller (History of Cape Silver), where the hallmark is mistakenly drawn as an anchor (MM63 in Heller, pg 154).

Rare Cape Silver Tablespoons (Set of 4) - Johannes Heegers
Johannes Jacobus Heegers, Cape 1814-1830
$ 880.00

A rare and lovely set of Fiddle pattern Cape silver tablespoons, by a rare maker whose work is seldom seen. The spoons are very good quality and weight, and are well preserved, these are substantial spoons. The drop is an unusual shape, has a colonial flavour. The hallmarks are excellent on all 4 spoons, makers mark JH in script and a device that looks like a bishops hat (mark 50 in Welz, Cape Silver). Heegers was born in the Cape in 1778, and worked between 1814 and 1830. In 1814-1816 he was recorded as a silversmith at 6 Roze street, and in 1829-1830 he was recorded as a silversmith in Graaff-Reinet, working with his brother Theodorus. A covered sugar bowl by Johannes Heegers is in the National Cultural History museum, depicted on pg 101 of Cape Silver by Welz.

Cape Silver Tablespoons (2) - Collinet
Daniel Collinet, Cape 1810-1825
$ 300.00

A set of 2 Cape silver Fiddle pattern tablespoons, by a lesser known Cape silversmith whose work does not appear very often. The spoons are a slightly different length (being handmade) and have similar but different hallmarks, so they were probably made at different times. Both have makers mark DC in between two floral or star devices, but both the makers mark and devices have differences, indicating they were struck by different punches. One DC makers mark has separate DC, the other DC appears to be cojoined. The floral or star device was used by a number of Cape silversmiths, including Beets, Hockly, Lotter, Townsend, Twentyman and Vos. The makers mark DC between 2 stars is depicted in Heller's Cape Silver Vol 2 (pg 122), where it is shown as mark NMM15.

Cape silver Tablespoons (set of 6) - Waldek
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1830
$ 680.00

A set of 6 Cape Silver tablespoons in the Fiddle pattern, with initials CIH over WAM. The initials CIH are older, the have more wear than the WAM initials, which would have been added later after a change of ownership of the spoons. All 6 spoons have excellent hallmarks, makers mark FW with the "Cape Stub" pseudo English hallmarks (see article on the Cape Stub in our articles section).

Cape Silver Dessert Spoons (set of 4) - Twentyman
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1820
$ 500.00

A set of 4 Cape Silver dessert spoons in the Fiddle pattern, with initials ACI clearly engraved on each spoon. The spoons have pseudo English hallmarks (duty mark, castle and date letter C), this is mark 139 from Welz (Cape Silver). No makers mark is present, but we can be confident the maker is Lawrence Twentyman, as he was the only Cape silversmith to use these particular hallmarks. The hallmarks are clear on all 4 spoons.

Cape Silver Tableforks (set of 5) - Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1830
$ 620.00

A set of five Cape silver tableforks in the Fiddle pattern, by the well regarded Cape silversmith Johannes Combrink. This set matches the 6 forks (item S 1480), and has the same engraved initials "FtW", and is by the same maker. The hallmarks are excellent on all 5 forks, makers mark IC and the Cape Stub mark (4 pseudo English marks struck together). This is mark 39 in Cape Silver by Welz, and includes lion passant, date letter A, duty mark and leopards head.

Cape Silver Tableforks (set of 6) - Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820
$ 740.00

A set of Cape silver tableforks in the Fiddle pattern, by the well known Cape silversmith Johannes Combrink. The forks are engraved with the initials "FtW", which is attractively engraved. The forks are good quality and a pleasing weight, they are suitable for use. The hallmarks on all 6 forks are clear. Four forks have makers mark IC only (Welz mark 31 in Cape Silver), two have makers mark IC between 2 ladder devices (Welz mark 33). Johannes Combrink was born in the Cape in 1781, he married Aurelia Lotter in 1807 and died in 1853. He worked from Dorp Street.

Cape Silver Knife - Extremely Rare
Johannes Martinus Lotter, Cape C 1850
$ 1 300.00

An extremely rare Cape silver knife, with ivory handle and engraved on the blade "EHM from HOM". The hallmarks are extremely clear, pseudo - English duty mark and castle, with makers mark JML (mark 82 in Welz, Cape Silver). These are accompanied by another mark, some sort of device, unrecorded in Welz. The knife is very well made, good quality and a pleasing weight. The ivory handle shows good texture and a changing colour from dark to light. The knife is extremely rare, being the only known example recorded to date. The leading authority on Cape Silver Stephan Welz said "I have been unable to trace any Cape silver knives" (Cape Silver pg 73), and David Heller said "the only type of silver knife in use at the Cape seems to have been the butter knife (History of Cape Silver, pg 202). Johannes Lotter was part of the highly regarded Lotter family of Cape silversmiths, being the son of Willem and the brother of Carel.

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Set of 3) - Colonial Silver
Peter Clarke Daniel, Cape C 1840
$ 490.00

A set of 3 Fiddle pattern Cape silver tablespoons, which are notable for their strong colonial feel, being slightly crude in nature, and with hand hammered stems. Each spoon is slightly different, clearly each spoon was made by hand, probably in primitive conditions. The drops are also crude, and have an amateurish feel, perhaps these were made by a novice apprentice? All 3 spoons have pseudo hallmarks, date letter a, date letter B and duty head, with no makers mark. The shape of the outline of date letter B is notched on both sides, making it very distinctive - hence our attribution to Peter Clarke Daniel (mark 41, Cape Silver by Welz). Mark 41 has the 2 date letters (a and B) together, with the duty mark - given the outline and occurrance we are pretty certain the same punches were used, but perhaps not by Peter Daniel himself. Further research is required, as we know Cape silversmiths occasionally interchanged punches amongst one another.

Cape Silver Snuffbox
Jacobus Johannes Vos, Cape C 1851
$ 1 050.00

A charming Cape silver snuffbox, retangular in form, and quite small in size. It is decorated with typically Cape engraving, generally a crude series of lines and dots. The cover is quite unusual, having a central shield cartouche (engraved "MMM Le R 1851") surrounded by 2 Scottish thistles - this design is very rare on Cape silver. The surname "Le R" (possibly Le Roux?) is probably French Huguenot in origin, the Scottish thistles are a mystery. The sides of the box have a zig-zag design, the base a blank rectangular design. The interior is gilded, and the base of the interior has an engraved sunburst design. The hallmarks are on the rim of the lid, and consist of makers initials JJV surrounded by 2 acorn devices (Welz mark 159). They are quite small but clear and well struck, but given the location difficult to see. JJ Vos was one of the last 2 surviving Cape Silversmiths, he worked between 1841 and 1882 (Welz).

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork
W.C. - unrecorded, Cape C 1820
$ 200.00

Typically Cape konfyt (preserve) fork, in the Fiddle pattern. The hallmarks are also typically Cape (WC or WG?) in a shaped punch, between 2 crude stars. The makers mark is a little indistinct, either a worn or mistruck punch, or could even be overstruck. Given this is an unrecorded maker not listed in any of the reference books (as far as we can determine), it could have another Colonial origin.

Cape Silver Tablefork - William Moore
William Moore, Cape C 1840
$ 170.00

Fiddle pattern Cape silver tablefork with Pseudo English hallmarks, which are clear, and makers mark WM. This hallmark punch was used by 5 different Cape silversmiths, including Twentyman, Combrink, Townsend and Beck, leading Welz (Cape Silver, pg 95) to speculate that all the silver with this mark came from the same workshop.

Rare Cape Silver tubular handled Konfyt fork
unmarked - possibly Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820
$ 620.00

An extremely rare Cape konfyt (preserve) fork with tubular handle, with typically Cape prick engraving of foliage at the top of the handle. No hallmarks are present. The handle is similar to the Cannon handle pattern of early English flatware. Similar forks are illustrated in Heller's History of Cape Silver (Vol 2, pg 82) and Welz's Cape Silver (pg 68), these are by Johannes Combrink.

Cape Silver Dessert Spoon Set - (6) - Waldek
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1850
$ 700.00

Set of 6 Cape Dessert Fiddle pattern spoons, that match the set of 12 Tableforks (item S 1193). All 6 spoons have very clear English Pseudo hallmarks and makers mark, and the same pair of worn double initials. The spoons are of of good weight, and are robust enough to be used.

Cape Silver tablefork - Waldek
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1850
$ 170.00

Cape Silver tablefork (Fiddle pattern) with interesting horse crest, initials HR and very clear hallmarks. The hallmarks include Pseudo English marks and the makers mark.

Rare matching set of Cape Tableforks (12) - Waldek
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1850
$ 1 450.00

Rare matching set of Cape Tableforks, in the Fiddle pattern, of good weight, and robust enough to be used. All 12 forks have very clear Pseudo English hallmarks and makers mark. The forks all have 2 sets of initials, but these are worn. These forks match the 6 Dessert spoons (item S1194), having the same maker and initials. Waldek, who produced silver from 1830 - 1877, took over Lawrence Twentyman's shop on Heerengracht street when Twentyman left the Cape.

Cape Silver spoonset - teaspoons (4), dessertspoons (4)
William Moore, Cape C 1840
$ 780.00

Interesting set of 8 Fiddle pattern spoons by the Cape maker William Moore. The dessert spoons are beautiful spoons, in excellent condition. The teaspoons have seen more use, with 2 having worn tips (possibly reshaped). Very clear pseudo English hallmarks are present on all 8 spoons.

Cape shellback tablespoon - Fiddle pattern   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape 1818-1832

Unusual cape shellback tablespoon, this is the only example of a Cape shellback we have seen. Very clear English pseudo hallmarks and makers mark. Twentyman moved to India in 1832, where he continued to trade as a silversmith.

Cape dinnerforks (6) - Fiddle pattern   
Lawrence Twentyman (5), John Townsend (1), Cape C 1830

Pleasing associated set of Cape tableforks, 5 by Lawrence Twentyman, one by his contempory John Townsend. Very clear hallmarks, showing the wide variety of hallmarking styles used by the Cape silversmiths. 2 forks have the initial W on the back.

Cape konfyt (preserve) fork - Old English pattern   
Martinus Lourens Smith, Cape C 1780

Typically Cape konfyt fork. Smith was a Dane who arrived in the Cape in 1757 as a VOC employee. The hallmark is partially obscured, with only LS of the MLS visible (overstruck?), but his 2 distinctive leaves are clearly visible.

Cape mash spoon - Old English pattern   
Jan Lotter, Cape C 1815

Beautiful and rare Cape spoon of unusual size and shape, with engraved initials AMW. It is teaspoon size but has a long stem, leading us to believe it is a mash spoon. Mash spoons were used to stir the teapot to assist brewing. Lotter produced very fine silver, although only for 4 years (1813-1817), indicating he probably died young. Very distinct makers mark.

Cape tablespoon - Fiddle pattern   
Martinus Lourens Smith, Cape C 1800

Plain Cape tablespoon with very clear hallmarks, showing makers initials between two Fleur de Lys.

Cape tablespoon - Hanoverian pattern   
Gerhardus Lotter, Cape 1812

This spoon has an original inscription, "IIH en EL, 1812". These are presumably the initials of the owners and the date of their wedding. A set of 6 tableforks by the same maker and with the same inscription are pictured in David Heller's 2nd Cape Silver book, "Further researches in Cape Silver", page 46, plate 5, with description on page 41. An additional pair of tableforks with the same inscription are present in the Africana Museum, and are pictured in the book "Cape Silver" by Stephan Welz, pg 67.

Cape sauce ladle - Fiddle pattern   
Daniel Beets, Cape C 1820

Cape sauce ladle with very clear hallmarks, the makers initials struck twice between 3 roses. Beets was the illegitimate son of the German Balthus Beets of Neubrandenburg and the Cape slave Angana.

Cape tablespoon -Hanoverian pattern   
Gerhardus Lotter, Cape C 1800

Early Cape tablespoon of Hanoverian pattern, with the end of the spoon turning up.

Cape tablespoons (pair) - Old English pattern   
Carel David Lotter, Cape C 1815

Beautiful pair of plain Cape tablespoons, with very clear makers mark. Both these spoons have the initial H lightly engraved on the back of the spoon shafts.

Cape dinnerfork - Fiddle pattern   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1830

Cape tablefork in good condition, with very clear pseudo English hallmarks and makers mark. Initials ADL on the back of the fork.

Cape Silver konfyt (preserve) fork   
JB, Cape C 1800

Typical Cape konfyt fork in the Fiddle pattern, with an unknown makers mark, not recorded by Morrison, Heller or Welz. The mark is clear, JB between an unknown device, possibly a bird?

Rare Cape Silver twisted stem Konfyt fork   
Jan Beyleveld, Cape C 1820

A rare Cape Silver twisted stem konfyt (preserve) fork, with spearhead handle and typical Cape floral engraving. This is similar to the pair (item S 1188), but the engraved flower lacks foliage and the only hallmark present is the makers mark, which is very clear.

Rare Cape Silver twisted stem konfyt fork and spoon (matching pair)   
Jan Beyleveld, Cape C 1820

A rare matching pair of twisted stem konfyt (preserve) fork and spoon, the fork having 3 prongs. They have spearhead handles, with typical Cape floral engraving, and very clear hallmarks. Similar forks and spoons are illustrated in Heller's History of Cape Silver (Vol 1, pg 148) and Welz's Cape Silver (pg 41). Byleveld worked from 53 Loop Street and 31 Waterkant Street from 1814 - 1827, when he died age 35.

Rare Cape Silver Butterknife - Fiddle pattern   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1820

Plain Cape butterknife with scimitar blade, and clear Pseudo English hallmarks. The makers mark is not present, but these particular Pseudo marks were only used by Twentyman (mark 134 in Welz, Cape Silver).

Cape Silver snuff box - Johannes Lotter   
Johannes Martinus Lotter, Cape C 1860

A very typical Cape snuff box, relatively crude in comparison to its English counterparts. Rectangular, rounded corners, bright cut wrigglework enclosing initials ECP, gadrooned thumbpiece. Interior has gilt remnants. Very clear makers mark.

Rare Cape Silver twisted stem teaspoon   
Jacobus Johannes Vos, Cape C 1860

A rare Cape twisted stem teaspoon, with spearhead handle and typical Cape floral engraving, and clear hallmarks. It is very similar to those made by Jan Byleveld circa 1820, so we can only assume it was made by Vos to match an earlier one made by Byleveld. Vos worked from 127 Long Street for 8 years, before dying at the young age of 27. He was one of the last working Cape silversmiths.

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Old English pattern   
Lodewyk Beck, Cape C 1850

Cape Konfyt (preserve) fork with 3 prongs, with clear English Pseudo hallmarks and makers initials. Silver Konfyt forks are unique to the Cape.

Cape Silver Tablefork - Lotter   
Willem Godfried Lotter, Cape C 1820

A Fiddle pattern Cape Silver Tablefork by a well regarded Cape Silversmith, with engraved initials AW. The hallmarks are clear, being the makers mark struck twice. Lotter worked as a silversmith from 1810 - 1835, and was regarded by Heller as one of the finest of all Cape silversmiths.

Rare Cape Silver Basting spoon - Jan Lotter   
Jan Lotter, Cape C 1815

Rare Cape Basting spoon (Old English pattern) with a large and deep bowl, and very clear hallmarks. The bowl is also wider than English versions, as can be seen from the comparative photo. The spoon also has a thick drop. Jan Lotter, who worked from 22 Keerom Street, only produced silver for 4 years from 1813 - 1817.

Cape Silver teaspoons (5) - John Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape C 1830

Matching set of 5 Fiddle pattern Cape teaspoons, with engraved initials MIH. Very clear pseudo English hallmarks.

Cape Silver Tableforks (pair) - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A pair of Fiddle pattern Cape tableforks, with clear English Pseudo hallmarks, but no makers mark. As these marks were only used by Lawrence Twentyman, we can be certain of the maker.

Cape Silver teaspoons (4) - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1830

Pleasant set of 4 Cape Silver Fiddle pattern teaspoons. Very clear hallmarks showing makers initials between device.

Cape Silver Teaspoon - Daniel Beets   
Daniel Beets, Cape C 1820

Cape Silver Fiddle pattern teaspoon with very clear hallmarks (mark 11 in Welz).

Cape Silver dessert spoon - Daniel Beets   
Daniel Beets, Cape C 1828

Cape Fiddle pattern dessert spoon with an interesting crest, crudely engraved, of a raised arm holding an axe. Hallmarks are clear, DB repeated twice between two stars.

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

Cape Silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, with very clear pseudo English hallmarks, including dutymark, bird, castle and date letter B. No makers mark is present, but as only Lawrence Twentyman used this sequence of marks we can be sure of its origin.

Rare Cape Silver Vinaigrette - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1830

An extremely rare Cape Silver vinaigrette, with attractive engraving, a sunburst surrounding a wreath contained in a rectangle on the lid, the base and sides also decorated with naive but attractive zig-zag and dot engraving, typical of colonial Cape silversmiths. The grille is also decorated by hand, with a crude flower and foliage surrounded by hand punched holes in squares. The interior is gilt. Both the lid and base are struck with 3 poorly struck hallmarks, which appear to be the lion passant between 2 castles. However the grille is struck with a very clear LT makers mark, without doubt that of Lawrence Twentyman. The only other known example of a Cape vinaigrette, by Martinus Lourens Smith, appeared at Sothebys Cape Town in February 2007 (Lot 428). None of the Cape silver reference books (Welz, Heller) mention vinaigrettes.

Cape Silver Konfyt (preserve) Fork   
Martinus Lourens Smith, Cape C 1800

Fiddle Pattern Konfyt fork, typical of those produced in the Cape. The fork is engraved "Irene". Konfyt forks were made and sold as individual items in the Cape (Welz, Cape Silver). The hallmarks are very clear, makers initials MLS between 2 Fleur de Lys (one is unclear). Smith was a VOC employee from Denmark who arrived in the Cape in 1757. He married 4 times, had 10 children and died in 1806.

Cape Silver Konfyt Forks (pair) - Martinus Smith   
Martinus Lourens Smith, Cape C 1800

A delightful pair of Cape silver Konfyt forks, in the rare Fiddle and Shell pattern. The forks also have a bevelled edge, and are single struck. Fiddle and Shell pattern is scarce (Pickford, Silver Flatware), Cape silver in this pattern is very rare. The hallmarks on both forks are very clear, being makers mark MLS between 2 Fleur de Lys. Smith was a Dane who arrived in the Cape in 1757. He married 4 times, had 10 children, and died in 1806 (Welz, Cape Silver).

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Lotter   
Jan Lotter, Cape C 1815

A typical Cape silver konfyt (preserve) fork with 3 tines, in the Old English pattern, with traditional Cape engraved decoration, consisting of crude stars and a zig-zag pattern which extends all the way to the tines. The makers mark IL is very clear. Jan Lotter, who was regarded by Heller as "a highly skilled craftsman", only worked for 4 years between 1813 and 1817, so he probably died young. He made most of the prized Cape silver "lemoenlepels" (orange spoons) known to exist today.

Cape silver Tablespoons (pair) - Beets   
Daniel Beets, Cape C 1820

Two Cape silver tablespoons in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved initials HV, attractively engraved by hand in Colonial style. The hallmarks are excellent, makers mark DB struck twice between 3 stars (Welz mark 15). Although from the initials we can see they are a pair, they are slightly different in quality, weight and condition. 1 spoon is beautiful, good quality, weight and condition, the other less so, it is lighter and has had a rougher life.

Cape Silver Fish Slice - Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1825

A rare and attractive Cape silver fish slice with an engraved fish on the blade between a row of leaves. The blade is pierced by hand and the engraving is typically Cape including the straight and wavy dotted decoration around the edge. The blade is quite large and oval in shape, and the Fiddle pattern handle is quite short. The join between handle and blade is visible, but is clearly original as the decoration over-rides the join. The hallmarks are very clear, makers mark IC between 2 shell devices (Welz mark 26), all well struck. Cape silver fish slices are quite rare, and ones with an engraved fish even rarer. Welz (Cape Silver) mentions that Twentyman was the only Cape silversmith who added the engraved fish (now clearly incorrect), one by Twentyman is pictured in Heller (A History of Cape Silver, pg 168, plate 74). The engraved fish on the Twentyman slice is very similar in style and design to this one, we hypothesize it was engraved by the same engraver.

Cape Silver Sugar Tongs   
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1840

A rare pair of Cape Silver sugartongs, in the Kings pattern with diamond heel. They are very good gauge, solid and well made with a strong bow, suitable for use. Whilst Cape sugartongs are known, most are plain (Welz, Cape Silver), this is the only example of Cape sugartongs in the Kings pattern we have ever encountered. The hallmarks are very clear, makers mark FW and the "Cape Stub", 4 pseudo - English hallmarks (lion passant, date letter, duty mark and leopard's head) struck mechanically in a fly press (see article on Cape Stub in "The Finial, 2007, and in the articles tab above). Fredik Waldek was also a chronometer, clock maker and jeweller. Heller (History of Cape Silver) commended Waldek for "excellent workmanship", these tongs are no exception. Only Waldek and Twentyman produced Kings pattern in the Cape.

Cape Silver Tablespoon   
Lodewyk Beck, Cape C 1855

Plain Cape Fiddle pattern Tablespoon, with very clear English Pseudo hallmarks. No makers mark is present, but the letter M is impressed twice, this has only been recorded on silver by Beck. Beck worked from Shortmarket Street and Greenmarket Square.

Cape Silver saltspoons (pair) - Jacobus Vos   
Jacobus Johannes Vos, Cape C 1860

Beautiful pair of Fiddle pattern Cape salt spoons. Vos died age 27 in 1862, having been a silversmith for 8 years at 127 Long street in Cape Town. Very clear hallmarks showing makers initials, in hexagonal outline, and pseudo English sterling and duty mark.

Cape Silver Dessert Fork - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A Cape silver dessert fork, in the Fiddle pattern, with 4 prongs, which are quite long. The hallmarks are clear but slightly worn, they include pseudo English duty mark, castle, date letter C and makers mark LT. This is mark 139 in Cape Silver by Welz, the C has a small gap.

Cape Silver Dessert Spoon - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A Cape silver dessert spoon in the Fiddle pattern. The spoon has pseudo English hallmarks, all individually struck, all the hallmarks are very clear. They include duty mark, bird, castle and date letter e, with makers mark LT. This is makers mark 131 (Cape Silver by Welz), although they are struck in a different order, which is quite common. It appears the Cape silversmiths were not too scrupulous about how hallmarks were struck.

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A Cape silver tablespoon in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved owners initials "de C", so probably a Huguenot. The spoon bowl is quite wide and the top of the handle has a very provincial rib and turn. The hallmarks are very clear, and include makers mark LT, and pseudo-English hallmarks (leopards head, date letter a, duty mark and lion passant). This is mark 135 in "Cape Silver" by Welz.

Cape Silver Tableforks (pair) - John Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape C 1830

Pair of Cape Fiddle pattern Tableforks, by the highly regarded silversmith John Townsend. The length of the tines is good, and the forks have very clear Pseudo English hallmarks and makers mark. The initials CJH are engraved on the back of the forks. Heller described Townsend as the most versatile of all the English silversmiths at the Cape, capable of excellent craftmanship.

Cape Silver Tablefork -Jan Lotter   
Jan Lotter, Cape 1813-1817

Plain Cape silver tablefork in the Old English pattern, with original owners initials lightly scratched on back (MF). Hallmark very clear, makers mark struck twice, either side of a flower (or bunch of grapes). Jan Lotter was an excellent silversmith who made most of the cape orangespoons (lemoenlepels) found today. He traded from Keerom St.

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Waldek   
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1850

A very fine Cape tablespoon by a maker who has a reputation of excellent quality, clearly evident in this spoon. Whilst this spoon was made c1850, it is a copy of an earlier 18th century style (Hanoverian with turn up, and the crest on the back of the spoon). The crest is beautiful, a hand holding an elaborate cross and the motto "TORTIS IN ARDUIS", ("twisted and difficult"?). The hallmarks are very clear, showing makers initials and pseudo English hallmarks. Waldek took over the business of Lawrence Twentyman when he moved to India.

Cape Silver dessert forks (set of 6)   
William Moore, Cape C 1850

Rare set of 6 Cape fiddle pattern dessert forks, with very clear English pseudo hallmarks and makers mark on all 6 forks. They have an interesting crest, a roaring half rampant lion with his front paws on a strange shaped object (we guess a church with a spire?).

Cape Silver Basting Spoon - Lotter   
Willem Godfried Lotter, Cape C 1810

A Cape silver Basting spoon in the Old English pattern, of good gauge, very suitable for use. Whilst the spoon is Old English pattern, the drop is definitely not English in style, it has a European flavour (which shows the different influences on Cape Silversmiths of the time). The hallmarks are very clear, makers mark WGL struck twice, and the inverted L device used by Lotter (mark 95 in Welz). The Lotter family are important in the history of Cape silver, with 12 members of the family known to have produced silver. Willem Godfried, who made this spoon, worked from 1810 - 1835, and is known for good quality work.

Cape Silver Teaspoon - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820

Fiddle pattern Cape teaspoon, with clear hallmarks (Welz no 27) including initials, 2 ladder device in ball, 2 shell device.

Cape Silver Teaspoon - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820

Cape Silver teaspoon in the Old English pattern, with very clear hallmarks, IC and shell. Combrink worked from Dorp Street.

Cape Silver Basting Spoon - Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1815

A rare Cape silver Basting (or Serving) spoon in the Old English pattern, this is a good quality spoon suited for use as a serving spoon. The spoon has a colonial feel, it has an unusual rectangular shaped drop, so was probably made before 1820 when English silversmiths arrived in the Cape and influenced styles. The spoon is quite plain, no crests or initials, but it is engraved "IV" on the back of the stem. This engraving is original and quite crude (typically colonial), perhaps done by the owner himself, possibly indicating it was once part of a set. The hallmarks are excellent, makers mark IC between 2 devices (flowers?), mark 27 in "Cape Silver" by Welz. Johan Combrink was a prolific and well regarded Cape silversmith, he worked between 1814 and 1853, and was based in Dorp street.

Cape Silver Hanoverian Tablespoon - Lotter   
Gerhardus Lotter, Cape C 1810

A lovely early Cape tablespoon in the Hanoverian pattern, with turn-up end. This spoon only has the makers hallmark, which is very worn but still faintly visible. Lotter generally only struck his makers mark, as is the case on this spoon. Lotter, who was part of a large family of silversmiths working in the Cape, was an extremely competent silversmith who made the Cape Town Lutheran Church chalice to match one made in Amsterdam in 1765.

Cape Silver Tablespoons (3) - Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1815

A set of 3 Cape silver tablespoons by Johannes Combrink, who worked in Cape Town between 1814 and 1853. These spoons are excellent quality and robust, well suited for use. The spoons resemble the Old English pattern, but are Continental in design, with a V shaped drop, strong lip on tip and flattening to the top half of the handles. Given the Continental style of these spoons, which is confined to early Cape flatware, we can assume they were made early in Combrink's career, probably between 1814 (when Combrink started producing silver) and 1820, when the English 1820 settlers arrived in the Cape, bringing with them English styles. Each spoon has a small identification nick on the back at the top of the handle (1-2 mm). The makers mark IC (Welz mark 32) is clearly struck on all 3 spoons.

Cape Silver Butterknife - Fiddle pattern   
Peter Clarke Daniel, Cape C 1850

Plain, good hallmarks, English Pseudo and makers name. Daniel arrived in the Cape in 1820 (one of the settlers) as a child from Dublin, his Father (who had the same name) was also a silversmith.

Cape Silver Tablefork - Jan Lotter   
Jan Lotter, Cape 1813-1817

A Cape Silver tablefork in the Old English pattern, with very clear Cape silver hallmarks. The marks include makers mark IL in circular punch struck twice, with an attractive flower mark (mark 74 in Cape Silver by Welz). This fork has contemporary rough, lightly scratched initials MT, probably the original owner, on the back of the fork. This matches item S1148, which is already sold. Jan Lotter was an excellent silversmith, who made most of the Cape lemoenlepels (orange spoons) found today. He traded from Keerom Street, and probably died young, as he only worked between 1813 and 1817.

Cape Silver Tablefork and Dessertfork - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820

A matching set consisting of a Cape Silver tablefork and dessertfork, in the Old English pattern, with matching contemporary initials DJ, probably the original owner. The initials are engraved on the back of the forks, in Georgian style. Both forks are good quality, with long tines, and are a good weight. The hallmarks on both are excellent, very well struck and clear, consisting of makers mark IC between the shell and ladder devices used by Combrink. It is interesting to note that the devices are not struck in the same order, so their placement by the silversmith was probably random. This is a combination of marks 26 - 28 in Cape Silver by Welz. Combrink was a member of the well regarded Combrink family of Cape silversmiths.

Rare Cape Silver Tablespoon - Frederik Herman   
Frederik Lambertus Herman(n), Cape 1810-1811

A very rare Cape silver tablespoon in the Old English pattern, by a very rare maker whose work is seldom seen. The makers mark FLH is excellent, very well struck, this is accompanied by an anchor mark in a circular punch (mark 51 in Cape Silver by Welz). Herman (or Hermann) was born in the Cape in 1778, he worked between 1810 and 1811 from 38 Long Street. He was regarded as "one of the finest of all Cape silversmiths" by David Heller, in his book History of Cape Silver. He made a very fine covered sugar bowl, which is depicted on pg 101 of Cape Silver by Stephan Welz.

Cape Silver Gravy Spoon - Twentyman, Kings Pattern   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A magnificent Cape silver gravy (also called basting or serving) spoon, in the Kings pattern, double struck with diamond heel. It has a lovely weight and is very good quality, this is one of the most substantial Cape silver spoons we have seen, and is suitable for regular use - in fact a spoon anyone would enjoy using. The hallmarks are very clear, makers mark LT for Lawrence Twentyman, and pseudo English hallmarks (leopards head, duty mark, date letter a and lion) - Welz mark 135, but in a different order. Twentyman was the most prolific of all Cape silversmiths, he had the first shop on Heerengracht (now Adderley Street) with a shop window. He worked between 1818 and 1837.

Cape Silver saltspoon - John Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape C 1830

Cape Fiddle pattern saltspoon complete with makers mark and pseudo english hallmarks (clearly visible), gilded bowl and engraved monogram TTA. The spoon is slightly longer than others we have seen. Townsend was a leading Cape silversmith, who had a shop on Heerengracht in Cape Town, and is regarded as one of the finest and most versatile of Cape silversmiths by Heller.

Rare Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, "Greatest Cape Silversmith"   
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape 1768-1811

A very rare Cape Silver konfyt (preserve) fork, in the Feather Edge pattern. The fork has makers mark DHS, well struck and clear, along with a bunch of grapes with vine leaves in a circular punch (mark 109 in Cape Silver by Welz). Schmidt arrived in the Cape from Strelitz, Germany, as a soldier in 1768. He worked as a sword cutler for the Dutch East India Company, and became a burgher and silversmith in 1779. He died in 1811 (Cape Silver by Welz, pg 139). He is described by David Heller (in his book History of Cape Silver) as the "greatest Cape silversmith". Heller goes so far to describe Schmidt as a "master craftsman, whose work can be compared to Paul Storr" (History of Cape Silver, pg 79).

Cape Silver Christening Mug   
John Townsend, Cape C 1830

Rare Cape Silver Christening mug, by the highly regarded Cape Silversmith John Townsend. The body is plain and cylindrical, the handle has a lovely leaf cap, and the mug is of good gauge. David Heller, author of "Cape Silver", described Townsend as the "most versatile" of all the English silversmiths who worked at the Cape. The hallmarks are clear, being makers mark and pseudo English hallmarks which are slightly worn (duty mark, date letter a, leopards head and date letter J) -(see Welz, Cape Silver, pg 122).

Cape Silver Dessert Forks (Set of 8) - Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape C 1825

A set of Cape silver dessert forks in the Fiddle pattern, with engraved initials "WAM". These forks have a strong colonial feel, the shape and size differs from the traditional English Fiddle pattern. The forks are a small, delicate size, my better half describes them as "sweet". The hallmarks on all 8 forks are excellent, and consist of makers mark JT (with indent to top of makers mark) with individually struck pseudo English hallmarks (duty mark, lion passant, date letter a and tree), Welz mark 123 in Cape Silver. Townsend was described as "the most versatile of all the Cape English silversmiths" by Heller (pg 101).

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Pair) - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1820

A fabulous pair of Cape silver tablespoons in the old English pattern, with a beautifully engraved contemporary family crest, a rabbit or hare jumping over a rock. The spoons are good quality and weight, and are well preserved. Both are struck with makers mark IC for Johannes Combrink, one is very clear, the other is slightly worn. The spoon terminals have a strong turn and rib on the back, and an unusual shaped drop, very colonial in style. We have not identified the family crest (suggestions welcome), perhaps Haas or Haasbroek? This pair are amongst our favourite Cape silver items, they are lovely spoons.

Rare Cape Silver Tablespoon - Johann Voight   
Johann Voight, Cape C 1790

A Cape silver tablespoon in the Old English pattern, with rare makers mark, which is very well struck. The tablespoon has a long drop, and initials "TA" on the back of the spoon, dating this spoon to the 18th century. The marks include makers mark "IVC" struck twice, either side of a very clear fish hallmark, complete with mouth, eye, fins and scales, this hallmark is very well struck. This is mark 171 in Cape Silver by Welz, who lists it as an unknown makers mark. The fish in Welz is not as clear as this actual hallmark. Welz also depicts the mark as "I:VG", so it must be a different punch - the dots are not present here, but the C could easily be a G. This mark is also depicted by Heller (History of Cape Silver, Vol 1) on page 163, where the fish detail is clearly visible - he attributes this mark to Johann Voigt (?), indicating the attribution had not been proved. Overall an interesting and rare Cape silver mark, extremely clear, this needs further research.

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Lodewyk Beck   
Lodewyk Beck, Cape 1847-1867

A Cape silver konfyt (preserve) fork in the Fiddle pattern, with 4 tines. The hallmarks are excellent, and include makers mark LB for Lodewyk Willem Christiaan Beck, and pseudo-English duty and town marks (castle), mark 7 in Cape Silver by Welz. Beck worked firstly from Shortmarket Street and then moved to Greenmarket Square, still today a vibrant market in the heart of Cape Town. Konfyt forks were made and sold as individual items, and are described by Welz as "having a great deal of charm" (pg 65, Cape Silver, Welz).

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Rare Hallmark   
William Moore, Cape 1840-1863

A Cape silver tablespoon in the Old English pattern, with a very rare Cape silver hallmark. The spoon is good quality and weight, well preserved, and has a colonial V shaped drop. The hallmarks include makers mark WM, and a very rare Cape silver stub mark that is not depicted in Cape Silver by Welz (Welz shows the regular Cape stub mark, used by 5 silversmiths including Moore, with 4 pseudo English marks). This stub mark has the lion passant, a gothic capital A, smiling leopards head and Queen Victoria duty mark, with detailed hair. As can be seen, this is a very different stub from the one usually seen, struck with a different punch (Welz mark 100). This rare stub mark is depicted by Heller (History of Cape Silver) as MM62 (pg 154), the regular Cape stub mark is MM61 (see also our articles section for an article on the Cape stub). The hallmarks are very well struck, this is a perfect example. A third stub mark, including an anchor, is also depicted in Heller (MM63), this same mark is also present in Morrison...

Rare Cape Silver Napkin Holder   
Dominique du Moulin, Cape C 1825

An extremely rare and unusual Cape silver Napkin (serviette) holder. The holder has an arm that hooks into a buttonhole, and a clamp that is opened or closed with a sliding ring. The clamp end is decorated in a very crude shell, and the sliding ring is crudely banded. This item could be unique, made by special commission, as none of the Cape silver reference books describe napkin holders. The hallmark is very clear (DBD between two stars, mark 44 in Welz). Dominique Badouin du Moulin was a Belgian from Mons (Bergen), who worked as a silversmith in the Cape between 1818 and 1833 (Welz, Cape Silver). He married the sister of silversmith Jan Beyleveld.

Cape Silver Tableforks (set of 6) - Rare Kings Pattern   
Lawrence Twentyman (4), Fredrik Waldek (2), Cape C 1830

Lovely set of Kings pattern (with diamond point) Cape tableforks, of very good quality and gauge - the forks are 100 grams each, very heavy to hold. Cape flatware in Kings pattern is fairly rare, the most prevalent patterns being Fiddle and Old English. These forks all have the same English pseudo hallmarks (leopards head, date letter A, duty mark and lion, Welz mark 135), struck by the same punch in the same workshop. However, 4 have the maker mark LT (Twentyman), and two have the makers mark FW (Waldek). This is not unusual, as Waldek worked for Twentyman, and probably took over the business when Twentyman departed for India, circa 1835.

Early Cape Silver Hanoverian Tablespoon - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt   
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape C 1780

An early Cape silver tablespoon, in the Hanoverian pattern (with turned up end). The pip at the top of the stem is very pronounced, sufficient that the spoon can "hang" from a finger!. This spoon also has a very unusual "fat" drop, also with a pronounced pip, we have not seen this feature before. This probably indicates the spoon was made early on in Schmidt's career. The spoon has makers mark DHS for Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, described by Heller (History of Cape Silver) as the Cape's "Greatest Silversmith". This spoon is extremely good quality, it is pleasing to hold. The second mark is the bunch of grapes used by Schmidt. Schmidt was originally a soldier and sword cutler from Germany, he arrived in the Cape in 1768 with the VOC (Dutch East India Company). He worked until 1811 (Welz, Cape Silver, pg 139).

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johannes Beyleveld   
Johannes Beyleveld, Cape 1814-1827

A Cape silver konfyt (preserve) fork in the Fiddle pattern, with 3 tines. The only hallmark is the makers mark J.B which is clear, mark 16 in Cape Silver by Welz. Beyleveld was born in the Cape in 1792, he worked from Waterkant and Loop Street.

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1825

A Cape silver tablespoon in the Fiddle pattern, with pseudo English hallmarks. The spoon bowl is long and elegant, and the spoon is good quality and is pleasing to hold. The hallmarks are very clear (Welz mark 148 in Cape silver) and nicely detailed, even hair is visible on the duty mark, and the flag is visible on the castle. The base of the duty mark is cusped, and the makers mark LT is also clear.

Cape Silver Berry Teaspoon - Waldek   
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1830

A rare Cape silver berry teaspoon, in the Fiddle pattern, with gilded berried bowl and decorated handle. The spoon must be well travelled in it's early life, as the spoon was made in Cape Town circa 1830, and probably "berried" in London in mid to late Victorian times, when the practice of "berrying" was popular (this practice is unknown in Cape silver). Plain Georgian silver spoons were embossed and chased with fruit and foliate scrolls (Pickford, Silver Flatware, pg 70), and the bowl was gilded to complete the effect. The hallmarks are very clear, makers mark FW and pseudo English hallmarks (leopards head, date letter a, duty mark and lion passant), these are mark 163 (Cape silver by Welz). These are the same punches used earlier by Twentyman, Waldek took over Twentyman's shop and workshop in 1836.

Cape Silver Saltspoon - William Moore   
William Moore, Cape C 1840

Plain Cape saltspoon in the Fiddle pattern with gilded bowl, and very clear pseudo English hallmarks and makers mark.

Cape Silver Hanoverian Basting Spoon - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt   
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape C 1780

A rare Cape silver Basting (or serving) spoon, by the Cape's "Greatest Silversmith" Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, as described by Heller in History of Cape Silver. The spoon is Hanoverian in style, with a very pronounced "turn up" end, almost 90 degrees to the spoon handle, a strong pip and a rib on the front of the handle. The spoon also has a double drop, and the stem changes from rounded to flattened. The spoon is a very good guage, with solid bowl and strong tip, very suitable for use. The hallmarks include makers mark HNS (mark 174 and 175 in Welz, Cape Silver) and a bunch of grapes. This was described as an unknown maker by Welz, but it is now accepted that this is the mark of Daniel Schmidt, with some wear and damage to the punch so the D looks more like an H (see Welz marks 108 and 109). The presence of the bunch of grapes, identical to that used by Schmidt, confirms this. The only other Cape silversmith to use a bunch of grapes was Jan Lotter, his bunch is quite distinctly different. Further confirmation ...

Cape Silver Konfyt Forks (Pair) - Christiaan Kruger   
Christiaan Kruger, Cape C 1780

A lovely pair of Cape Silver Konfyt (Preserve) forks, made by Christiaan Kruger circa 1780. The forks are 3 pronged, indicating its early age, and have pointed terminals. They have typical Cape engraving, with a double banded wavy prick engraved border, and attractive star on terminal, above original initials IK. Both forks are struck with makers mark CK (Welz mark 61), one of the marks has been double struck. Kruger was born in the Cape in 1761, and apprenticed in 1773. He married Hester de Villiers in 1784.

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Gerhardus Lotter   
Gerhardus Lotter, Cape C 1810

A rare Hanoverian pattern 3 prong Cape silver Konfyt (preserve) fork, by Gerhardus Lotter, this fork has loads of character, we really like it. The fork has a pronounced Hanoverian rib on the front, and original engraved initials PM on the back (18th century flatware was engraved on the back, when they were placed tines down on the table). The fork also has an unusual V shaped drop, more Continental in style than English. The fork is hallmarked twice with makers mark GL (Welz mark 70), the punch is quite crude, the G looks more like a C, possibly worn. Gerhardus Lotter, son of Johannes Casparus Lotter, was part of the Lotter family of Cape silversmiths. He was born in 1764 and died in 1824, Welz records him working between 1810 and 1824 (Cape Silver, pg 135). From the style of this fork we would date it circa 1785, well before English influence arrived at the Cape, so perhaps Lotter worked earlier than suggested by Welz.

Cape Silver Marrow Scoop - William Moore   
William Moore, Cape 1840-1863

A rare Cape silver marrow scoop, in the Fiddle pattern, by Willam Moore, who worked in the Cape between 1840 and 1863. The scoop is the traditional design, with 2 differently sized scoops at either end, used for eating bone marrow, a "popular delicacy at the Cape" (Welz, Cape Silver and Silversmiths, pg 76, where a similar fiddle pattern scoop by Moore is depicted, but in much worse condition than this one.) The scoop is in excellent condition, no dents, scratches or repairs, it does not appear to have seen much use. The Cape hallmarks are very clear, and include makers mark WM and the Cape Stub mark (see article in our articles section) of 4 pseudo English hallmarks struck in a stub (Welz mark 101). A very similar Cape silver marrow scoop by Willam Moore, but with makers mark struck the other way, can be seen on the Steppes Hill website (http://www.steppeshillfarmantiques.com/silver-and-porcelain/d/rare-19th-century-cape-silver-marrow-scoop/98455/216995).

Cape Silver Konfyt Forks (pair)   
Johannes Martinus Lotter, Cape C 1850

Pair of Cape Silver Konfyt (preserve) forks, in the Fiddle pattern, with very clear hallmarks and initials JWH. Pairs of konfyt forks are fairly rare, most konfyt forks found are singles. The hallmarks on both forks are very clear, and consist of makers mark, pseudo English dutymark and castle town mark. Johannes Lotter was a member of the Lotter family of silversmiths, he was the son of Willem Godfried Lotter and the brother of Carel David Lotter. He also made the snuffbox featured on our website (item S 185).

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Daniel Collinet   
Daniel Collinet, Cape C 1810

An interesting Cape silver tablespoon, that appears more Continental than Cape in style. It is Fiddle pattern, but without the shoulders seen in English Fiddle pattern, and the drop has a wide oval shape, another Continental silver feature. The spoon has a single hallmark, makers mark DC, well struck but by quite a crude, home made punch, with flaws in both letters. This punch is a different one from the one depicted in Welz (Cape Silver, pg 146, mark 21), but has been noted on other Cape Silver, so we are confident it is by Collinet (no other Cape silversmiths have initial DC). Collinet was born in Liege, Belgium, he worked in the Cape between 1810 and 1825. We assume he made this spoon early in his career, certainly before 1820 when a number of English silversmiths arrived in the Cape and dictated the style of silver.

Cape Silver Kings Pattern Dessert Spoon - Fredrik Waldek   
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1830

A rare Cape silver Kings pattern (with diamond point} dessert spoon, by Fredrik Waldek. The spoon has original engraved initials HMC, and is very good quality and gauge, as is usual for Cape Kings pattern silver, very suitable for use. The hallmarks include makers mark FW with the Cape Stub mark (see article in our articles section) of 4 pseudo English hallmarks struck in a stub (Welz mark 165). Fredrik Waldek was also a chronometer, clock maker and jeweller. Heller (History of Cape Silver) commended Waldek for "excellent workmanship", this spoon is no exception. Only Waldek and Twentyman produced Kings pattern in the Cape.

Cape Silver Teaspoons (Pair) - John Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape C 1824

A pair of Cape silver teaspoons in the Fiddle pattern, with excellent hallmarks. The spoons also have a very faint and crudely scratched owners initial S on the back above the hallmarks, barely visible. The individually struck hallmarks include makers mark JT for John Townsend, pseudo duty mark, pseudo date letter a, pseudo leopards head town mark and pseudo date letter J (Welz mark 122, but struck in a different order). John Townsend (1800-1875) was an interesting character, descibed by Heller as one of the top 5 Cape silversmiths. He arrived in the Cape in 1821 on the ship Duke of Marlboro, and was involved in a number of businesses, including a hotel and auctioneering business, in addition to being goldsmith, silversmith, jeweller and watchmaker. He was embroiled in a number of court cases, mostly due to bad debt, in 1849 he stated "insufficient means to support his 10 children". He moved to Okiep in Namaqualand in 1852 as Manager of Spektakel Copper Mine, but was insolvent by 1868. He died in 1875, and is...

Sterling Silver Apostle Spoon Set (13) - Heritage Collection   
Cape Mint, Cape 1978

A set of 13 sterling silver Apostle spoons, as follows: The Master, St. Peter, St. John, St. Matthew, St. Andrew, St. Philip, St. Jude, St. James the Greater, St. James the Less, St. Matthias, St. Simon, St. Thomas, and St. Bartholomew. The Apostles are well modeled, with lovely detail, as can be seen from the photographs. For example, St. Peter has keys, St. Simon a saw, St Andrew a cross, St. Jude an axe, and St. James a staff and bible. The spoons are from a set (no 97), issued by The Heritage Collection in 1978, limited to 1000 sets. The hallmarks are clear, and include maker mark CM (Cape Mint, part of the Pagliari Group), STG for Sterling silver, antelope head for South Africa, and date letter E for 1978. All the spoons have the Apostle's name engraved on the stem, and the set number 97. They come complete with original signed certificate. The original solid wooden box is also available, this is large and heavy (1.5 kilograms), so will require extra postage if required.

Cape Silver Salt Spoon - Rare INCE Makers Mark (not shown in Welz)   
Joseph Ince, Cape C 1823-1828

A rare Cape silver salt spoon, in the Fiddle pattern, struck twice with a makers mark not depicted in any of the Cape silver reference books (although Ince is recorded in both Morrison and Welz). The spoon is struck twice with makers mark INCE, which is very distinct. The spoon is quite crudely made, slightly out of shape, it appears hand made in primitive conditions, it has a strong Colonial feel. The makers mark INCE is recorded by Turner as unascribed Scottish Provincial (Directory of Scottish Provincial Silversmiths, pg 84). It was also recorded as "unascribed Scottish" by Jackson (2nd edition, pg 557, on a tablespoon circa 1770, owned by The Marquess of Breadalbane) - this had been corrected by the third edition. We believe that the possible Scottish attribution is incorrect, and should be corrected to Cape. A number of other Cape silver items made by Joseph Ince are known, including 3 items in the Mullne collection, now in a museum in Pretoria, all struck twice with INCE. In addition, a South Africa...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johan Hendrik Vos   
Johan Hendrik Vos, Cape 1761-1810

A Cape silver konfyt fork by the respected silversmith Johan Hendrik Vos, part of the Vos family of Cape Silversmiths. The fork is quite long and elegant, in the Old English pattern, and has no engraving. It has 3 tines, (later forks have 4 tines), so probably dates to before 1800. The fork also has a wide semi circular drop, also indicative of a date before 1800. The hallmarks are excellent, and consist of a square punch with 4 dots struck twice, either side of makers mark JHV in script in oval punch (Welz mark 152, Cape Silver and Silversmiths). Vos worked between 1766 and 1810, he apprenticed with Johann Hasse between 1761 and 1766. He married in 1770 and had 12 children, his wife Elizabeth continued his business after he died in 1810 by adding the hallmark Wed (Weduwee, or widow) next to his JHV makers mark (Welz mark 154). The Vos Family produced over 10 Cape Silversmiths between 1748 and 1862 (Heller, History of Cape Silver Vol 1, pg 66-71, and page 269 for a family tree). The 4 dot square punch was als...

Cape Silver Snuff Box - Johannes Martinus Lotter, Colonel Frank Shuttleworth, Bedfordshire Yeomanry   
Johannes Martinus Lotter, Cape 1844-1879

A Cape silver snuff box, with an intriguing later inscription with both Bedfordshire and Boer War connections. The snuff box is rectangular with a shell thumb piece, and has typically Cape wriggle work engraving around the sides, which is worn from use. The interior is gilded, and has a later engraved inscription "Frank Pym from Frank Shuttleworth Xmas 1911". The box has a very clear JML makers mark on the lid. The box is well made, has very pleasing snug closure, very suitable for use. Frank Shuttleworth (of Old Warden, Biggleswade) was High Sherriff of Bedfordshire in 1891, he was followed by Francis Pym (of Hassells Hall, Sandy) in 1903. Shuttleworth (Colonel) raised the Bedfordshire Imperial Yeomanry in 1901 for service in the Boer War, we assume he acquired this Cape Silver snuffbox during his service in South Africa, answering the question why a Cape silver snuffbox has a Bedfordshire inscription. The Bedfordshire Yeomanry also served later in both World Wars. The Shuttleworth name today is known due ...

Cape Silver Lemoen Lepels (Orange Spoons) - Pair, Jan Lotter   
Jan Lotter, Cape 1813-1817

A rare pair of Cape Silver lemoen lepels (orange spoons), with an interesting provenance, they featured in the book Cape Silver and Silversmiths by Stephan Welz, pg 93. The spoons are the traditional lemoen lepel shape, with narrow, pointed boat shaped bowl, and triangular terminal, and Cape prick engraving. The spoons have a very elegant shape, the bowls deep and curved, the drop is distinctly v shaped, they have a lovely feel in the hand. Both spoons are clearly hallmarked with makers mark IL in rectangular punch for Jan Lotter, and also are punched with initials HB, we assume the original owner. Welz describes orange spoons as"probably the most attractive type of spoon made at the Cape, derived from Dutch spoons", pg 95. He also notes that all known examples are by Cape born silversmiths of the early 19th century (so not made by the more prolific English immigrants who arrived after 1815). Jan Lotter, who died young after a short career (1813-1817), was part of the Lotter family of Cape silversmiths, he ma...

Rare Cape Silver Teaspoons (2 available) - Thomas Lock Townsend, Masonic Hallmark   
Thomas Lock Townsend, Cape C 1815

A rare pair of Cape silver teaspoons in the Fiddle pattern, with excellent hallmarks. They include the rare Masonic "Square and Compasses" symbol, the single most identifiable symbol in Freemasonry. This hallmark is very well struck on both spoons. The other hallmarks include makers mark TT for Thomas Lock Townsend (struck twice), and pseudo Georgian duty mark (Kings head) - see Welz, Cape Silver, mark 126. Thomas Lock Townsend arrived in the Cape in 1815, the first of the English silversmiths to arrive. He was followed in 1819 by his half brother John Townsend, who joined him in a brief partnership between 1824 and 1825. Thomas Lock Townsend found business difficult in the Cape, he was declared insolvent in 1819, and when he died in 1849 left insufficient estate to cover his funeral costs. Besides being registered as Goldsmith and Jeweller, he practised as mechanical dentist, lodging house keeper, and had an equipment store and fitting out warehouse (Welz, pg 141) We are selling these 2 spoons individually...

Cape Silver Snuff Box - Daniel Beets   
Daniel Beets, Cape 1812-1828

A Cape silver snuff box by Daniel Beets, oval in shape with a three quarter hinged lid, which is well made as it is perfectly flush with the lid, and a small but practical thumbpiece. It is a pleasing design for a snuff box, has a very nice feel in the hand, easy to take in and out of a pocket. This is a fairly rare design for Cape silver snuff boxes, most were rectangular, or had a protruding hinge. This box has been well used, as can be seen from the considerable wear to the engraving, and has been repaired more than once in its lifetime. The lid has remnants of engraved wreath surrounding owners initials and date, no longer legible. The box also has 3 worn engraved stars, typically Cape in style, one either side and on the fixed portion of the lid. The interior has original gilding, a lovely golden yellow colour, quite well preserved on lid and hinge, but only some still present in base and sides, the rest has been lost during repairs. The base shows signs of repairs and splits, so has been re-attached at ...

Cape Silver Hanoverian Soup Ladle - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt   
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape C 1780

An early Cape silver Hanoverian pattern soup ladle, by Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, described as the greatest of Cape silversmiths by David Heller (History of Cape Silver). The ladle is a very pleasing gauge, very heavy to hold, and has a long drop. It also has the central Hanoverian rib on the front, and a strong turn up. The ladle is hallmarked with makers mark DHS, which is clear, but struck by a worn punch (mark 174 in Welz, described as unknown by Welz, but now known to be Schmidt's mark). Schmidt had a long career (1768-1811), his makers mark punch must have become worn over time. The second hallmark is larger and circular, but worn, probably the bunch of grapes hallmark often used by Schmidt. the third mark nearby does not appear to be a hallmark, but an imperfection in the silver.

Cape Silver Dessert Forks (Pair) - William Moore   
William Moore, Cape 1840-1863

A pair of Cape silver dessert forks in the Fiddle pattern, with contemporary engraved initials "WHG". The initials are engraved on the back of the forks, indicating the fashion to place forks with tines down at that time. The forks are very good quality, a pleasing weight and are in excellent condition. The hallmarks are clear, and include makers mark WM and the "Cape Stub" mark, with 4 pseudo English hallmarks (see our articles section for a description of the Cape Stub).

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Set of 5) - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape C 1820

A set of 5 Cape Silver tablespoons in the Fiddle pattern, with initials GHJ which are clearly engraved. The spoons have a chamfered edge (very Continental in style), and all 5 spoons have clear hallmarks (Welz mark 135). The marks include crowned leopards head, date letter a, duty mark and lion passant.

Cape Silver Lemoen Lepel and Konfyt Fork (Orange Spoon and Preserve Fork) - Pair, Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1820

A rare Cape Silver lemoen lepel (orange spoon) and matching konfyt fork (preserve), we have not encountered a matching set before, none are recorded in the Cape silver reference books. The spoon is the traditional elegant lemoen lepel shape, with narrow, pointed boat shaped bowl, v shaped drop, and triangular terminal. The matching fork has 4 tines, both feature traditional Cape prick engraving with a 4 petalled flower. Both are clearly hallmarked with makers mark IC in rectangular punch with canted corners for Johannes Combrink, and also are punched with initials IFS, we assume the original owner. Welz describes orange spoons as"probably the most attractive type of spoon made at the Cape, derived from Dutch spoons", pg 95. He also notes that all known examples are by Cape born silversmiths of the early 19th century (so not made by the more prolific English immigrants who arrived after 1815). Heller, in his book History of Cape Silver, describes orange spoons as "exquisite". Johannes Combrink of the famous Co...

Cape Silver Mustard Spoon - John Townsend   
John Townsend, Cape 1824-1841

A rare Cape silver mustard spoon, in the Fiddle pattern with gilded bowl, and excellent hallmarks. This is a lovely, well made spoon, with a marked angle at the drop, and pleasing proportions. The hallmarks include makers mark JT in damaged punch (Welz mark 123), and 4 pseudo marks (Georgian duty, lion passant, date letter a and tree mark). Heller does record Cape made salt and mustard spoons, and depicts 6 salt spoons in his book "History of Cape Silver" (pg 202, plate 67). Cape mustard spoons appear to be be much rarer than salt spoons, this is the only known example we have encountered.

Cape Silver Konfyt Forks (Pair) - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1814-1853

A pair of Cape silver Fiddle pattern konfyt (preserve) forks, with 4 tines, by Johannes Combrink. Both forks have excellent hallmarks, maker mark IC between 2 devices (possibly pomegranite?), see Cape Silver by Welz, mark 27, pg 147 - although on these forks the device has been reversed, with ball on inside, showing Cape silversmiths were not too concerned how hallmarks were struck. Johnannes Combrink worked between 1814 and 1853, he was a fine silversmith who produced good quality work.

Cape Silver Teaspoon - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853

A Cape silver teaspoon, in the Fiddle pattern, by Johannes Combrink. The spoon has original owners initials HV engraved on the stem, the engraving is most attractive. The teaspoon has an unusual drop with incised curve. The spoon is marked with makers mark IC (Welz mark 30, Cape Silver, pg 147), this is very well struck and clear. Note faint scratch mark JER near hallmark, we presume a previous owner, visible in photo, not really visible normally unless you look close in good light.

Cape Silver Tea Spoons (Pair) - JJ Vos   
Jacobus Johannes Vos, Cape 1854-1862

A pair of Fiddle pattern Cape silver teaspoons, with original engraved initials "RHL". The teaspoons are a pleasing weight, and are well made, good quality spoons, well preserved. The spoons have a Colonial feel, the Fiddle is more flattened than English examples. The engraving of the initials is lovely, they also has a Colonial feel. The hallmarks are excellent on both spoons. The include makers mark JJV in an unusual 6 sided punch (Welz mark 161), pseudo sterling lion, and pseudo duty mark (Queen Victoria's head with good detail, and hair bun). Jacobus Vos worked from 127 Long Street, unfortunately he died young, age 27, unmarried, which is a pity as he produced good quality silver.

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Lawrence Twentyman, Rare Hallmarks   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape 1818-1832

A Cape silver Fiddle pattern tablespoon, with a set of extremely rare Cape silver hallmarks. The hallmarks include makers mark LT, and pseudo marks that include date letter A, lyre and duty mark. These marks are shown by Welz in his book Cape Silver (mark 144, page 156), they are also shown by David Heller in his book History of Cape Silver (mark MM84, page 156). The makers mark, A and lyre mark are well struck and very clear, the duty mark is worn at the top. The date letter A is quite distinctive, with one arm much thicker than the other.

Cape Silver Kings Pattern Dessert Forks (Pair) - Waldek   
Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1836

A pair of Cape silver dessert forks in the Kings pattern, by Fredrik Waldek. The forks are very good quality and gauge, but a little shorter than usual. The forks are double struck (pattern on both sides), and have the diamond heel, as is usual with Cape silver Kings pattern. Cape silver in Kings pattern is quite rare, it was only produced by 2 silversmiths, Twentyman and Waldek, who took over Twentyman's business. The hallmarks are very clear on both forks, and include pseudo Georgian duty, date letter a and crowned leopard's head, along with makers mark FW, which is slightly worn. The forks have no monograms or engraving, and none has been removed. Waldek had a long career as a Cape silversmith, chronometer, clockmaker and jeweller, he worked between 1830 and 1877. He took over Twentyman's shop and partnership on Heerengracht in 1836. The forks have shorter stems than other examples, see S 1866 for a comparative example.

Cape Silver Kings Pattern Dessert Forks (Two) - Twentyman & Waldek   
Lawrence Twentyman, Fredrik Waldek, Cape C 1836

A set of 2 Cape silver dessert forks in the Kings pattern, one by Lawrence Twentyman and the other by Fredrik Waldek. These forks match S 1864 and S 1865, we have put these 2 together to show an unusual variance in length. Whilst both are Cape Kings pattern dessert forks, they have a 1.2 cm difference in length (the shorter fork is also lighter, 54 vs 62 grammes). The difference is the stem only, the decoration top and bottom is identical, as are the length of tines. It is believed that Twentyman imported dies for Kings pattern to the Cape circa 1830 and that Waldek took over the dies in 1836, but we cannot explain the difference in length, all suggestions welcome. We have carefully studied the forks, there is no evidence they have been lengthened or shortened. The forks are double struck (pattern on both sides), and have the diamond heel, as is usual with Cape silver Kings pattern. Cape silver in Kings pattern is quite rare, it was only produced by these 2 silversmiths, Twentyman and Waldek, who took over T...

Cape Silver Kings Pattern Dessert Forks (Pair) - Twentyman   
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape 1818-1832

A pair of Cape silver dessert forks in the Kings pattern, by Lawrence Twentyman. The forks are very good quality and gauge, a pleasure to hold. The forks are double struck (pattern on both sides), and have the diamond heel, as is usual with Cape silver Kings pattern. Cape silver in Kings pattern is quite rare, it was only produced by 2 silversmiths, Twentyman and Waldek, who took over Twentymans business. The hallmarks are very clear on both forks, and include pseudo lion passant, Georgian duty, date letter a and crowned leopard's head, along with makers mark LT. The forks have no monograms or engraving, and none has been removed.

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